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Culinary Trivia? - Page 2

post #31 of 56
Good try Sisi, but the term upper crust goes back much further than that. In the 1300's, they did not usually use plates or platters to eat on. They were reserved for serving. People would eat on slices of large round bread (called Trenchers sp?). Well you can imagine how soggy and messy these things became after numerous courses, leaking all over the table and the guests. The nobility were always offered the first (or top slice) since it was covered in crust making for a less messy edible plate.
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http://www.onceachef.com/ is my personal blog where I share many recipes, my passion for cooking, and all things food.
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post #32 of 56
Pete,


To be honest I made up the story about the upper crust. I couldn't find any reference to it and no one else was posting a answer, so I made up a little story.


Sisi
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When I get a little money, I buy books. And if there is any left over, I buy food.

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post #33 of 56
Thread Starter 
Ok this topic is getting out of control a bit so how about from now on we put each question in bold type. After one question has been answered we move on to the next one. When you answer a question be sure you mention which question you are answering. If you are not sure how to put something into bold type, click on this link: http://www.cheftalkcafe.com/ubb/ubbcode.html

Answer to the question: Where does Pumpernickle get it's name? (originally posted by me)

The story goes, that Napoleon's horse was named Nicole and that the horse was fed a dark bread (what we now know as pumpernickle) each morning. When the bakers would bring the bread in the morning they would shout in French "Pain Pour Nicole" which eventually developed into Pumpernickle.

Next question?????
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Thanks,

Nicko 
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All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
All About Braising: The Art of Uncomplicated Cooking
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(26 photos)
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post #34 of 56
I thought napoleans horse was called Marengo and a chicken dish was named after him. Maybe he had a lot of horses and the chefs, to cull favour, named their dishes after him.Here is one for you.
what is the term above the salt indicate?
post #35 of 56
I think Marengo was the site of a battle fought by Napolean, and the dish is named in its honor. (Julia Child agrees-- See The Way to Cook).

[This message has been edited by Mezzaluna (edited September 01, 2000).]
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post #36 of 56
live_to_cook, you are right on the money with your answer on mangosteen,
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Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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post #37 of 56
Above the salt indicated your position at the table. The salt cellar was placed on the table strategically to indicate who was who. If you sat "below the salt", you were lower class than the others at the table. Thomas Costain wrote a book called "Below The Salt" years ago.
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It is sheer foolhardiness to be arrogant to a cook.
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post #38 of 56
Augiewren, I read that book, too! Since we're talking about archaic topics, what is marchpane?
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post #39 of 56
[QUOTE]Originally posted by jeff_macrae:
[B]As for searing it does not hold in the juices in fact it causes the meat to release more juices, (if you don't believe me check out Harold Mcgee's "On Food and Cooking")

That is correct! No juices are sealed in, in fact Harold McGee mentioned that 50% of the chefs he spoke with still believe that searing seals. I guess we can't let go of Escoffier, eh?
post #40 of 56
Crecy refers to carrots.

[This message has been edited by chefjohnpaul (edited September 04, 2000).]
post #41 of 56
Now I heard that Espagnol sauce was actually brought to France via a Spanish Queen who married a French King, I think. Can anyone varify this?
post #42 of 56
Now I heard that Espagnol sauce was actually brought to France via a Spanish Queen who married a French King, I think. Can anyone varify this?
post #43 of 56
I can't verify the details, but the stocks and sauces chef-instructor at J&W Charleston said that sauce Espagnol (and the use of roux) originated in Spain. He didn't say where he got his information.
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Anulos qui animum ostendunt omnes gestemus!
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post #44 of 56
Who is the French Economist and agronomist(1737-1817)who wrote numerous works on food and was responsible for the popularization of "potatoes" in French Cooking? Before his time they were scorned as unfit for human consumption. His last name is used to describe a particular style of Classic French Cookery. (Wurzer,1981)
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Another Day, Another Battle.
Don't Ride A Boat Without A Paddle.
If The Water Is Not Too Deep,
Take A Little Swim But Don't Fall Asleep!
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post #45 of 56
Parmentier.
M.W.H.
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M.W.H.
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post #46 of 56
Parmentier.
M.W.H.
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M.W.H.
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post #47 of 56
Chef Mark Hayes you are correct...Antoine Auguste Parmentier! "In Cuisine, the word Parmentier means that potatoes will be included in the dish in one form or another, but the potatoes being a prime feature in the dish" (Wurzer, 1981)
Another Day, Another Battle.
Don't Ride A Boat Without A Paddle.
If The Water Is Not Too Deep,
Take A Little Swim But Don't Fall Asleep!
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Another Day, Another Battle.
Don't Ride A Boat Without A Paddle.
If The Water Is Not Too Deep,
Take A Little Swim But Don't Fall Asleep!
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post #48 of 56
RE: Espagnole, from The Oxford Companion to food (Davidson, 1999)

"The name has nothing to do with Spain, any more than the counterpart term allemande (see veloute) has anything to do with Germany. It is generally believed that the terms were chosen because in French eyes Germans are blond and Spaniards are brown."

Now, where does cream of tartar come from?
post #49 of 56
Creme of tarter is the acid scraped form the sides of wine barrels after fermentation.
Tartaric Acid

Who wrote the first cook book?????
"Every kiss is a blessing"! Or is it "Every blessing is a kiss"
Does anyone know what time it is.
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"Every kiss is a blessing"! Or is it "Every blessing is a kiss"
Does anyone know what time it is.
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post #50 of 56
Apicius-"Romanae Artis Coquinariae Leber" (The Roman Cookery Book)..... "the first comprehensive book on cookery"..."a compilation of the many recipes and bits of information about food by this merchant collected during his travels." (Chesser 1992)
Another Day, Another Battle.
Don't Ride A Boat Without A Paddle.
If The Water Is Not Too Deep,
Take A Little Swim But Don't Fall Asleep!
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Another Day, Another Battle.
Don't Ride A Boat Without A Paddle.
If The Water Is Not Too Deep,
Take A Little Swim But Don't Fall Asleep!
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post #51 of 56
nice work!
"Every kiss is a blessing"! Or is it "Every blessing is a kiss"
Does anyone know what time it is.
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"Every kiss is a blessing"! Or is it "Every blessing is a kiss"
Does anyone know what time it is.
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post #52 of 56
What was the name of the first women chef. and how did she get the job?
"Every kiss is a blessing"! Or is it "Every blessing is a kiss"
Does anyone know what time it is.
Reply
"Every kiss is a blessing"! Or is it "Every blessing is a kiss"
Does anyone know what time it is.
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post #53 of 56
does anyone know??
"Every kiss is a blessing"! Or is it "Every blessing is a kiss"
Does anyone know what time it is.
Reply
"Every kiss is a blessing"! Or is it "Every blessing is a kiss"
Does anyone know what time it is.
Reply
post #54 of 56
I've been trying to find out the answer but so far no luck! Guess I'm not trying hard enough! I'll keep on looking.
Another Day, Another Battle.
Don't Ride A Boat Without A Paddle.
If The Water Is Not Too Deep,
Take A Little Swim But Don't Fall Asleep!
Reply
Another Day, Another Battle.
Don't Ride A Boat Without A Paddle.
If The Water Is Not Too Deep,
Take A Little Swim But Don't Fall Asleep!
Reply
post #55 of 56
O.K. last chance!
"Every kiss is a blessing"! Or is it "Every blessing is a kiss"
Does anyone know what time it is.
Reply
"Every kiss is a blessing"! Or is it "Every blessing is a kiss"
Does anyone know what time it is.
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post #56 of 56
You are correct, Maryeo. To those of you with culinary encyclopedae, does it derive from "pain" (bread)? I always wondered. I'd love to learn the derivation of marchpane/marzipan.
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