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Considering buying a yogurt maker

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
My husband eats a lot of Dannon Light yogurt, and it dawned on me while reading the thread about yogurt that it might be less expensive to make the yogurt myself. I've been enjoying Greek yogurt (Fage brand) but it, too, seems expensive at almost $2.00 US per 5 ounce container. Also, the storebought yogurt comes in containers that are not recyclable locally, so I'd like to cut down on plastic waste.

I've just started looking at the universe of yogurt-makers and wondered if any of you have experience with them- or if they're even necessary to making delicous, low-fat (or non-fat) yogurt at home.
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post #2 of 14
I remember making my own yoghurts 30 plus years ago, just using a wide necked thermos flask! The results were indistinguishable from those I made later in a yoghurt maker that was given to me as a present!
post #3 of 14
Thread Starter 
Ishbel, would you care to share the method?
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post #4 of 14
Luc H started a thread about yogurt a couple of days ago, and as usual he has lots of info :D "Low-Tech homemade yogurt"

I contributed too, about how I make it.

Andy
post #5 of 14
Mezz, as should be quite evident, you don't need a yogurt maker. Folks have been making it without such equipment for about ten thousand years.

However, a yogurt maker does make the job a bit easier and more controlled.

We have a Yogourmet yogurt maker and are quite happy with it. Initially we bought the unit, plus an extra hopper, and some other accessories (comes with a termometer, packet of freeze-dried starter, etc.). Total investment was around 80 bucks. It paid for itself within a couple of months, based on the savings.

Basically there are two types of yogurt maker. The Yogourmet type, which uses a temperature-controlled water bath surrounding a single large container, and the other type, which does the same for a group of smaller, cup-like containers. In use, I do not believe one is advantageous over the other. So the deciding factors are 1. cost, and 2. whether you prefer one large container in the fridge or a bunch of smaller ones.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #6 of 14
It's a long time since I bothered to make home-made yoghurt - so I'm doing this from memory!

Bring 1 pint full-fat milk to the boil. Allow to cool until you can dip finger in without burning... (extremely scientific method, eh?!). Add two/three full teaspoons of a live plain yoghurt (has to be 'live' yoghurt, to allow process to happen) and stir in. On reflection, I think that when I first started to make it, I used a whole small one-portion carton as the 'starter', and then 2-3 teaspoons of the home-made stuff to make subsequent batches.

Put mixture in a wide-mouthed vacuum flask. 8-12 hours later you have yoghurt! You then use a portion of your home-made yoghurt as the 'starter' for every other batch.

This can be bland, so add chopped fruit or seeds/nuts to the yoghurt before serving.
post #7 of 14

Breville Yogurt Maker - no instructions & need recipes

Hi I have just signed on and I think this is my type of site! I have been given a Breville Yogurt Maker and want to know how to use it asap.

It has an electric outside container and clear lid and a clear glass jar with no lid. Do I put hot water in the container and then put the jar in, or do I just put cold water in and the machine heats it to the right temperature.

I do hope someone can help me as I have just had my 13 year old grandson come to live with me and he eats Yogurt every day (strawberry) and I just cannot afford to keep buying it for him.

This leads to my other question: has anyone got any good recipes for strawberry yogurt, mango or banana, or any fruits for that matter.
I live in tropical in Darwin Australia and would love to chat to others re recipes etc.
Bye for now, Cheers Charlene (Australia) :confused:
post #8 of 14
Hi, Charlene. Welcome to ChefTalk.

First off, I would contact the manufacturer and ask them for an owners manual. Most reputable companies have no trouble doing that. And you'll also determine if you actually have all the parts.

For instance, with the Yogourmet unit, both the inner and outer containers have lids. That may or may not be true for the Breville.

What we do is fill the outer container to the mark with warm water and plug it in. By the time we've mixed up the milk etc. the water is at the proper temperature. If you start with cold water it takes far too long to do that.

If there's no contact info on the unit itself, try googling Breville and see what comes up.

As to the fruit, for several reasons it makes more sense to add the fruit just before serving. Most often you do this in the form of a puree, or maybe with small dice.

Take the mango, for instance, I would keep a little aside, to dice, and puree the rest, addiing whatever other flavors you want. A bit of ginger is always nice, for instance. Then dice the reserved pieces in about quarter-inch squares. Mix everything well into the yogurt. And you're good to go. If he's used to commercial yogurt I would think about adding some sugar, too. Then slowly wean him away from the sugar.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #9 of 14
I have a euro cuisine yogurt maker. It doesn't use a water bath. I think it works well; I have made mostly soy yogurt and those always turn out good (except this morning, I haven't use it for awhile and I did it wrong so it tastes weird).

Pretty easy to use this one. It comes with a couple of culture packets to start you off, then after that you can just add one of the yogurts to a new batch. Pretty good.


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Outside of a dog, a book is a man's best friend. Inside of a dog it's too dark to read. - GM
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post #10 of 14
The Fage Greek yogurt - which is really Greek - is very good but expensive. Trader Joe's Greek-style yogurt is very good too, and much less expensive.

You can make your own Greek-style - or at least of Greek texture - by just putting your regular or homemade yogurt in a strainer lined with a paper towel and letting it drain overnight. Don't forget to put something underneath to catch the whey. :smiles:

The Frugal Gourmet used to say leave it on the counter, but I put in the fridge.
travelling gourmand
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post #11 of 14
My oven has a pilot light, and is always warm. This morning, for reasons other than making yogurt, I stuck an oven thermometer in the oven, and although the thermometer doesn't measure that low, the temp peels like it may be about right for making yogurt. Anyway, the point is thatyou may be able to use your oven instead of a yogurt maker.

Alton Brown did a show recently in which he made yogurt using a heating pad for the heat siurce - we all know how much he hates uni-taskers <LOL>.

Mike, the TJ's Greek style yogurt is a very good alternative, considering the value, to the Fage, but sometimes having the "original" is required. TJ's has a relatively recent addition to their yogurt lineup - Mediterrannean Style Yogurt - like a labneh. VERY good, imo. http://www.cheftalk.com/forums/food-...ader-joes.html

shel
post #12 of 14
I have 30 years experience in making yogurt and have always used the Salton Yogurt Maker that comes with 5 white colored glass cups with plastic lids. You can get a maker from ebay for less than $20. Now for a couple of facts concerning technique:

1. Innoculation temperature is 140F or thereabouts. Innoculation temperatures range from 120-140+ degress F. But yogurt innoculated at the lower end of the temperature range tastes somewhat sour. Innoculate at 140F and it'll taste veeeeeeeeery creamy.

2. Heat the milk to around 180-190F; foam will appear. Allow the milk to cool to 140F and then innoculate with 1 heaping tablespoon of yogurt with active cultures. Assuming that the Salton unit is used, allow the mixture to proceed for the next 12 hours (24 hours are okay, too). Refrigerate overnight and munch!!!

3. Use an accurate thermometer such as those manufactured by Tel-Tru. They're excellent quality.

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-T

Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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post #13 of 14
mezzaluna, we have had excellent results with the Salton yogurt maker, it has 5 individual cups with lids in a straight line, comes with a spoon for adding your culture with a thermometer on it. My mother picks up these yogurt makers at the second hand store for $2.:lol: (which is great if you need to replace cups or want more containers). Sounds like the one koko described.

It makes consistently good yogurt, I keep it simple, just straight milk and culture, no powdered milk added, etc. The texture of the yogurt is excellent, really happy with it, tastes better than store yogurt.

My hubby started making yogurt because he likes organic milk, and the cost difference was huge, and it's fresher.
post #14 of 14
The yogurt maker that STIR describes IS the one that I have always used. And never have I made a batch of yogurt that was 'over cooked/done'. And yes, once I got two makers including cups for less than $5 on ebay.

Furthermore, I insist on using a regular dial face thermometer for yogurt making although the spoon that STIR speaks of has one built into it. Do get yourself a dial faced therm. and it can be used for all sorts of other applications in addition to yogurt making.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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