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Air conditioning

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 
I'm just curious how many of you work without airconditioning?
I don't want to ***** and complain, but when its 98 outside it is really tough to work in an unairconditioned kitchen.
post #2 of 23
Air Conditioning? whats AC? the past few days have been 95+ outside and 125+ inside! I don't like it at all, but its what 3 months of the year i have to deal with it. I just wish we got some form of HAZARD pay for it!

Andy
post #3 of 23
I have been working in a kitchen for the last couple of weeks where it has been 120 degrees..whew.:eek:..the place I work for during the hockey season is air conditioned.
post #4 of 23
I remember working in an Indian restaurant where the kitchen was poorly ventilated and was far hotter than outside in the summertime. Even when I was only doing prep was I actually afraid of sweating into the food... I was basically sweating buckets.
"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
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"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
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post #5 of 23

Can't take the heat?

My kitchen is 100-years old (part of a historic building). It is 120-degrees right now (I kid you not). I got into cycling and placed myself on a diet, managing to lose 35-pounds so far. I simply had to! (I'm a 50-year old smoker and being 40-pounds overweight in this environment is potentially lethal).

Drink buckets of water, have a Gatoraide or two and PUH-LEESE make sure you load up every day on B-Complex vitamins before you go in. If you need to lose weight, this is the perfect motivator.

-Ron
post #6 of 23
Worked at many places, high end, low end etc. Only the ice cream shop had ac.
Many times the kitchen reached upwards of 120 F. We usually made a big bucket of ice water with oranges, lemons and limes and would chug that all night long with frequent runs to the walk-in for a quick breather. Don't miss that I'll tell you!
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My latest musical venture!
http://myspace.com/nikandtheniceguys
 
Also
http://www.myspace.com/popshowband "I'm at the age when food has taken the place of sex in my life. In fact I've just had a mirror put over my kitchen table." Rodney Dangerfield RIP
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post #7 of 23
I work in Arizona. It can get up to 114 outside and 125+ in the kitchen. I even get the pleasure of barbequing every Friday behind 2 170 fires that I get to chop wood for. I have learned to take pride in the fact that I step away from the kitchen or grill to cool down in 110 degree weather.
post #8 of 23
Running cold water over your wrists will cool you down fast. I can tolerate heat better now that I'm older than I could when I was young. If your kitchen is capable of being air conditioned and the owner is just too tight to do it, the strategy is to point out how hard that is on the refrigeration equipment. They generally won't care about you or your comfort, but when you point out that the refers are working twice as hard as they need to and pulling more current because of it, they start to see the advantage in preventing breakdowns and saving on the utility bill. I have seen this strategy work. We also used to set a box fan on top of the microwave with a bus pan full of ice in front of it. Worked pretty good.
post #9 of 23
Yep it's brutal. We had a/c but on my station at full capacity the kitchen still reached 120-130. It was a nightmare.

Uggggh I still remember it like it was yesterday and it's been over 10 years now...
post #10 of 23
I guess I am just lucky, we have a semi-open kitchen so it can only get so hot. I usually work saute and it is around 95 w/ no burners going and up to 110 w/ all 12 going. I just drink tons of unsweetened iced tea and try to make it into the walk in whenever I can.
post #11 of 23
no ac in the kitchen, so afternoons prepping are pretty sweaty. The humidity makes it 10x worse. I am on the grill though, which is in the dining room, so I at least get AC on one side, and well over 100 degrees on the other side..
post #12 of 23
just keep a small bucket of water in the closest fridge with towels in it. whenever is gets hot, put one over your neck, when it gets warm, put it back in the bucket and reach in for another one.
post #13 of 23
Ya know what they say.........................

Can't stand the heat.......

If you're on the line it's always gonna be a sweat fest. Try working at the Broadmoor. :bounce:Never worked in a kitchen where the previous nights consumption wasn't drained from the body.:beer::smiles:

Towels, ice, prep sink showers all help but only for that moment. I used to keep 4-1 litre bottles of water or a d-lexan in the station reach-in cooler with some success. LOL
post #14 of 23
I look at it like this that is what makes us different from everyone else. We can walk in to a kitchen and it be 100 degrees turn on all equipment and it gets around 115. Then on a busy night the squirt bottles and salt and pepper container over the saute line are so hot you almost have to touch them with a towel. How many people can say the work in that enviroment push out 100-600 meals (depending on where you work) successfully. Not many people. So yea it is hot and it always sucks during the summer time, but atleast we aren't cold in the winter.
Big Simp :cool:
post #15 of 23

we have no air con..

but i have a nice kitchen on the ground floor, 5 big windows out into a big yard (park..) windows can be opened. and we ahve an excellent extracor fan system. of course when it is 38C (don't know how much that is in F) outside, and russian summers are hot, the kitchen also gets warm, but never uncomfortable...
and there is always lots of warm, little sweetend 'kompot' ( 20 ltr water, 2 kg fruits, 1 kgr sugar and 1 lemon) makes a very refreshing drink. definitely no icewater, soda or cold beer.
good food, one of the few pleasures left to mankind...
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good food, one of the few pleasures left to mankind...
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post #16 of 23
no a/c.....60 year old kitchen on the third floor with dbl deck huge ovens that are not well insolated.....all the windows to the outside are not openable. Though this year we did get a huge industrial fan and it makes a huge difference. If I have to bake in the summer I just plan on going in prior to 6:30am so that we don't have the ovens and stove going during the heat of the day.

I've got a BBQ coming up in 2 weeks....only 40 guests but the grilling will be in the hot time of the day at a client's home. I'm thinking of bringing a change of clothes so I can freshen up and be semi presentable.
Taking a small powerful fan and extension cords.

Water......lots of water, I find when newbies start getting headaches they've just not consumed enough H2O....It's pretty easy to prep/cook and just not eat or drink for hours.
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #17 of 23
There has been discussion in our establishment about buying water bras (the falsies filled with water, for the natural feel) and keeping them in the freezer for quick, refreshing change outs......... this is for the nights we girls feel we that we could wring our "t**s out," because they are so sweat drenched.

Okay..........back to work.
post #18 of 23

hot kitchen!?

ha, try baking in hot kitchens too. But all my yeast products turned out a treat.

It got so hot in my Bake shop that I'd have to eighter stay late and bake or come in early and bake, and when the kitchen reached over 104, I'd have to sit outside.

the place next door was an ice cream parlor, ugh.

I never drink anything with sugar when I work the hot kitchens, I find that it makes me dehydrate faster.

plain water is what makes it work for me.

thank goodness that even though my kitchen now is tiny, I have 10 foot ceilings, and there is an opening at the top to the main hallways, so it may get warm but never too hot to work.
Food may bring us together, but a CAKE makes it a PARTY!!
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Food may bring us together, but a CAKE makes it a PARTY!!
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post #19 of 23
Yes, the joys of summer. That walk in refer sure needs cleaning out much more frequently and dont we need to reorginize the freezer. When working the line nothing beats the old iced t-towles around the neck or even draped over the head with a little ice under it and the hat on top (desert style). Sheesh, these are just memories as I am now in a cool kitchen. :roll::roll:
The two most common things in the universe are hydrogen and stupidity !
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The two most common things in the universe are hydrogen and stupidity !
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post #20 of 23
I found a nice trick is to put a chinois in the walk in freezer and wrap a damp side towl around it. Let it freeze and then fold it up and wrap around your neck, works great for about 15 min.
post #21 of 23
It's the humidity that really makes the difference......It's been low 90's here this past week (pretty great mild summer until last week...) when the humidity slammed us.
I've opted to go without a/c at home just fans this summer.....really seemed to make a difference when going from home to work, I'm able to acclimate to the heat of the kitchen. There have only been a couple days when I've considered shutting up the house and cranking on the a/c......but the night comes and a fan right beside the bed + a cold bath makes it liveable.
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #22 of 23
Me, I have nice a/c all the time, I feel sorry for you guys!! LOL

I posted pics of my digs in the photo gallery, we have to keep the place cool for the chefs table :-)

I have worked in some HOT places though like the Carribean and Thailand.
Fluctuat nec mergitur
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Fluctuat nec mergitur
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post #23 of 23
phhhhtttt......
103* yesterday, the bank said 111*.....we're breaking all kinds of weather records here. really slows down life all the way around.....
we ate outside last night and it was cooler outside than inside, the chocoliteer brought her ice chest outside to be cooler....nice breeze after dark. food was cold, beer was cold, water was cold, company was sentilating.
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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