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Knife Repair

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
Hi all. It's been a while since I was here, it's nice to see some familiar names.

On to my dilemma. My stepson's theater group asked my wife if he could borrow a larger knife to use as a prop in his latest play. Instead of handing over one of the Chicago Cutlery, she gives out my vintage 12" Sabatier carbon steel chef's knife. :mad:

I get the knife back damaged. The handle is cracked around the center rivet, which I think I can live with. However, the blade and the handle are no longer in line. If I place the handle down on the counter, I can slide the tip of my index finger under the point of the blade. Flip the knife over, and my finger slides under to about the second joint.

So besides using the knife one last time, and then going to jail, is this repairable? I don't see any cracks in the steel. Or should I just retire this knife and start looking for a replacement? Thanks all.
post #2 of 20
Yes, it's reparable. But it's expensive if you want the same knife back.

Sabatier would probably just replace it with a current knife. Which it doesn't sound like you want.

There are a number of craftsmen who could do the repair but their time isn't cheap. And finding one isn't easy either. But if you're committed to this knife, I'll give you some pointers later.

You could probably repair it yourself with new scales and rivets from Texas Knifemaker's Supply: The Complete Source of Knife Making Supplies! You'll have to shape, attach and peen the rivets. You'll need power tools to shape the scales.

So I think you're better off buying a new one.
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #3 of 20
Try D & R Sharpening Solutions or The Epicurean Edge: Japanese and European professional chefs knives. I haven't used them yet, but I've seen nothing but praises for their work on several other forums.
post #4 of 20
Thread Starter 
If Sabatier made the same knife, it would be an easy solution. I may end up looking for one on Ebay or something.
post #5 of 20
How handy are you in the workshop?

You can get copper rivets, one source that I know of is Lee Valley, and you can make your own new wood handles, or scales, as they are called.
I have done this for a few of my knives. It's alot of work, but it is rewarding in it's own little way.....
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #6 of 20
I second dave at dr and dan at EE they have both done work for me and it has been top notch !
post #7 of 20
Part of your problem is that "Sabatier" isn't a company. It used to be more like a guild.

Regrettably, it's now a rather meaningless marketing term, used for anything from a quality French knife made "the old way," to stamped out crap from China in a fancy package.

Maybe you should re-consider the homicide option. If you manage to get a chef on your jury, you'll surely be acquitted. :blush:
post #8 of 20
Thread Starter 
:lol: Well, I'm certainly PO'd, but not quite that much, I guess. Actually, the idea of replacing the handles gave me a thought. If I replace the handles, in the process I would be down to the bare steel. At that point, it would be easier to straighten the blade, right? Does anyone know how likely it would be to snap or be seriously weakened?
post #9 of 20
Contact this knifemaking supply house. They'll probably know where to direct you for repairs.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
(1 photos)
 
Reply
post #10 of 20

Howdy;

I have cooked for 60 years...My oldest knife goes back to

my grandfather, born l888 in Egert, Hungary...Before

WORLD WAR I...Still hand sharpened....

  Now as to your problem...Make sure you install

a lock on the knife drawer as it WILL happen again!

  Is the blade and tang bent in a bow?

If so, it will have to be heated to flatten it out...

...Also, if you wish, I can mail you an elk or deer

horn handle that can be fitted on the tang...Let me

know..You can have it for free..................

  I would also look up the manufacturer and see

if they will repair it for you....

  Sometimes they will actually repair the item...

rsvp if interested in deer or elk horn....

"chance"

vietnam vet.............friday june 20th, 2014

18oo hrs zulu

post #11 of 20

I would like to get new handles for my tired Chicago Cutlery knife set, as they are cracked and split. What do you have in the way if Elk or Deer horn?

post #12 of 20

There's no one in this thread doing such repairs for others. The resources are linked if you want to track down a person or do it yourself. 

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #13 of 20

I can't completely visualize what the damage is, but so long as all the wood is there, or you make a little patch where needed, epoxy and sandpaper will put it all back together practically like new.

 

Use a decent laminating resin, make sure it has no mercaptans in the formulation.  You rarely see this stuff, no one probably makes it anymore, but sometimes used to be found in cheap hobby crap.  They are harmless but emit an unpleasant odor that takes forever to disappear, and the cured product tends to be rubbery.  The jerks at Great Planes used to sell this carp, might still, ruined a repair job of mine.

 

The syringe stuff found in hardware stores is usually kinda thick, but if everything is loose and there is space it will flow in OK.  Just don't get the 5min stuff.  Make sure the plungers stay even as you squeeze it out.

 

Plan out the action, put on some food-service vinyl gloves, mix the epoxy real good and go for it.

 

 

Rick

post #14 of 20
Guys, are you aware of the date stamps in this thread? It has been reopened after seven years with a far from coherent first post by a new member who never came back.
post #15 of 20

Gosh!  I hope he didn't land in jail.  ;-)~

post #16 of 20
Thread Starter 

Well, I didn't end up in jail at least. :)  But I did end up divorced (and no, the reason I started this thread way back when isn't the reason). I never did try to repair the knife. I just keep using it the way it is, and it keeps soldiering on. Hope everyone is doing well!

post #17 of 20

Wow, that's quite a thread resurrection!  But since you're the OP I guess it's okay.;)

"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
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"Excellence is an art won by training and habituation. We do not act rightly because we have virtue or excellence, but we rather have those because we have acted rightly. We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence, then, is not an act but a habit." - Aristotle
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post #18 of 20

Clean the cracks of grease using 91% isopropyl alcohol and allow them to dry completely. Fill the cracks with liquid cyanoacrylate adhensive (a/k/a "super glue", e.g. Loctite Professional Liquid). Hold the knife horizontally, roll it from side to side as it dries, and keep adding super glue as it sinks into the cracks. The end result should be a raised area over each crack. Let it dry over night and apply more superglue if there are depressions. Using a file or utility knife with a new blade, shave the raised area of the super glue repair until it is almost flush. Sand with 220 grit, then 320 grit and lastly 400 grit silicone carbide or aluminum oxide abrasive paper then finish with 0000 steel wool. Wide cracks will show clear while most narrow cracks are almost invisible. Tiny bubbles may be visible in wider cracks. I've repaired dozens of fine kitchen knives and steak knives using this technique and have had very good to excellent results. Many new knives have fiberglass reinforced POM to prevent this problem, but inexpensive knives continue to use POM with this liability. Stabilized/laminated wood used prior to POM becoming popular is generally much more durable.

post #19 of 20

Ahh, no one mentioned that sabs are I believe are invariably fairly soft carbon.  If after all these years you do decide to try check where the bend is, clamp in vise at the intuited location for the particular bend, and repeatedly flex and hold for a moment, wear goggles and gloves just in case there is a snap, but so long as you don't overdo it you should be fine.  You can also set the blade on blocks and use a c-clamp for the force, then bend it a bit in the opposite direction and let sit overnight.

 

 

Rick

post #20 of 20
Excellent advice, but once it's done the blade will need new thinning and sharpening. My vintage have invariably spines with a lot of bents, but the edge and the first 1/2" behind are perfectly straight. Why would you bother about a bent that doesn't affect performance? By the way, straightening goes better when the blade is hot, put it in boiling water for a short time and wear gloves.
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