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Chinese food in China

post #1 of 17
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Edited by Luc_H - 11/1/15 at 1:20am
I eat science everyday, do you?
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I eat science everyday, do you?
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post #2 of 17
I just got back from China and I totally believe it. Especially in Beijing...
Outside of a dog, a book is a man's best friend. Inside of a dog it's too dark to read. - GM
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Outside of a dog, a book is a man's best friend. Inside of a dog it's too dark to read. - GM
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post #3 of 17
Would this truely suprise you? Ever eaten out of their restaurants? Anything that flies, crawls, and/or swims ends up in the market and eventually, on someone's dinner plate. As a Chinese person, I know that we'll do whatever for money...just most of us wouldn't think of something like that. I remember doing some window shopping in Chinatown in downtown Toronto here to find a sidewalk vendor trying to sell off knockoff watches at full brandname prices...this was many years ago, saw him once and never again.
post #4 of 17
My son travels to Taiwan fairly often, and gets taken out to eat by the local staff. The first time, for a special treat, they took him to... McDonalds! :rolleyes:
When he get back he said that was the first time he had been to a McD's in about eight years.

Subsequent visits, he got to sample local food, and said when you go for real Chinese food, make sure your hosts explain VERY VERY thoroughly and EXACTLY just what is in each dish. ;)

Mike :D
travelling gourmand
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travelling gourmand
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post #5 of 17
Wow. I'm going to try to avoid Chinese food products as well as Mexican veggies from now on.
post #6 of 17

More or less

post #7 of 17
Perfect summary of this post! :lol:

Mike
travelling gourmand
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travelling gourmand
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post #8 of 17
post #9 of 17
Fantasies abound...

Lobster Weighs More Than 17 Pounds - Videos - KNBC

I like how they banded the claws- perhaps handcuffs would be a better idea.
post #10 of 17
i like chinese food . i like grill duck
post #11 of 17
On kuan's video, I don't think the fish is alive anymore. People seem to think that if its still moving, then its sill alive. OK well, lets decapitate a few people and see what happens...duh! I sometimes want to smack animal cruelty and activists alike for opening up their mouths before thinking, nerve endings are still shooting and the insides are all cooked, of course its effing dead!

On bluedogz video, I'd like to see how much that thing will fetch...how much per lb again?

On the subject, even here in Toronto we have a very lively Asian community and several Chinatowns but I only really trust a small handful of these places. Us Asians are swindlers, I'll admit it and ashamed of it. I don't see any other culture who pirates as many movies, music, and software as much as we do, and I rarely see as much food on the edge of going bad in any other market compared to most Chinese markets. If you've seen that Russel Peters thing on Pacific Mall, you may laugh but its really close to the truth |http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KwwtKQEE8jI|
post #12 of 17
Yeah whenever I go to these places I make sure I take my mother. :D Get the best deals that way.
post #13 of 17
Zhang was not the only one to feel the crackdown bite. A Chinese court handed down a one-year jail sentence Sunday to a Chinese reporter convicted of faking a story about steamed dumplings whose stuffing included cardboard along with ground pork. Zi Bejia, 28, pleaded guilty to damaging the dumpling industry's reputation, the official New China News Agency said.

washingtonpost.com
post #14 of 17

How Things Have Changed

A 17.5 lb lobster? That's just a baby.

During Colonial times, and even into the Federalist period, lobsters of 100 pounds were documented in New York harbor.

Indeed, lobsters---along with oysters and Atlantic salmon---were fed to bond servants in such quantities in the Middle Atlantic and New England states that laws had to be passed limiting how often that could be done.

It always amuses me how many of today's luxury items were once foistered on the poor and downtrodden.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #15 of 17
"People seem to think that if its still moving, then its sill alive. "

A true story:

I'm out trout fishing in the Adirondacks, and start to clean my catch. I gut & gill a nice brookie and reach over the side of the canoe to rinse it off. It slips out of my hand---and swims away.

Now I know all I need to know about muscle contractions and stimulus response. But, people, do not ever let that happen if you've had a few.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #16 of 17
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Edited by Luc_H - 11/1/15 at 1:33pm
I eat science everyday, do you?
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I eat science everyday, do you?
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post #17 of 17
Apparently they were also fed to convicts, which caused a big snit and nearly incited a riot.
"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
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"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
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