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Making soups without a burner/stove?

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
What would be the preferred way to make soups from scratch for a cafe without the use of a burner? My current location does not have the hoods and ventilation in order to have a stove. What products and procedures are recommended to do this? What could I do about the meats for lets say chicken noodle soup? The last thing I want to do is have to buy pre-made soups..:eek:

thnx

Vinnie
post #2 of 20
It's summer - why not make cold soups?
post #3 of 20
How much soup do you need to make daily ?
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post #4 of 20
Thread Starter 
1-3 gallons depending on how much we sell

I will start off with smaller batches, about 1 gallon
post #5 of 20
The last food service unit I operated had NO heating equipment, with the exception of a half-size convection oven. I purchased 6 butane (Iwatani) burners to do all my "stove top" cooking. I resorted to Knorr's soup mixes and enhanced them, as needed. Actually, they are not so bad... add water, bring to a boil and allow to thicken, serve. Made, if I recall correctly, 2 gallons at a shot. The Knorr folks even supplied the merchandising/display pieces, soup inserts, menu cards, etc. I went through about 2 cases of butane per week and broke about 1 burner a month, which isn't really bad considering that I didn't have many other expenses is the area of utilities.

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Invention, my dear friends, is ninety-three percent perspiration, six percent electricity, four percent evaporation, and two percent butterscotch ripple

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post #6 of 20
Make the soups at home and transport. What's a few gallons ? Easy and controllable. You can make anything you want.:chef:
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One time a guy pulled a knife on me. I could tell it wasn't a professional job; it had butter on it.- Rodney Dangerfield -


'We're ALL amateurs; It's just that some of us are more professional about it than others'. - George Carlin
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http://www.frappr.com/chefsunited
One time a guy pulled a knife on me. I could tell it wasn't a professional job; it had butter on it.- Rodney Dangerfield -


'We're ALL amateurs; It's just that some of us are more professional about it than others'. - George Carlin
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post #7 of 20
"Cooking Homework" now that's dedication... think the health department might have an issue with that, though.

Invention, my dear friends, is ninety-three percent perspiration, six percent electricity, four percent evaporation, and two percent butterscotch ripple

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Invention, my dear friends, is ninety-three percent perspiration, six percent electricity, four percent evaporation, and two percent butterscotch ripple

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post #8 of 20
Thread Starter 
We landed man on the moon over 40 years ago.....
There MUST be some kind of soup cooker out there or something that can be purchased that will accomplish the task!

I heard mention of a device called a cook and serve?

The inspectors will be customers so the homework thing is a no go:lol:, and they made specific mention of wanting soup
post #9 of 20
Do you have a microwave? I had my whole range go down eight days from port one time. Thank goodness, only had twelve people on board to feed, but they were soup lovers.
I did the saute veggies and herb thing in the microwave, then added meat? or grains? or beans? and some stock and put in crock pot to finish.

BTW, most know that fish, chicken and veggies work well in microwave, but meatloaf comes out really nice, like a big juicy meatball, need sauce, not brown. Also frittatas and bread pudding for breakfast; and, of course oatmeal. you learn a lot in eight days, did have commercial size microwave and a great micro cookbook
post #10 of 20
Shipscook's idea of using a microwave oven is a pretty good idea. I've made a lot of things, including soup, in a microwave. Why didn't I think of that? <LOL>

Shel
post #11 of 20
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the tip! I really have to start working on some recipes!
post #12 of 20
I do believe the commoners call this a crock pot.

Depending on your budget and space concerns, could this not work?
http://www.atlantafixture.com/Detail...PERMANENT+WARE

Somebody else here prob knows more than me about what temp the soup has to stay at, etc.

Or you could get really good at gazpacho.
post #13 of 20
Yep go the microwave :) They're not as nasty as some make them out to be hehe - I'd be lost without mine.

Could you use an electric frypan in your location? Some are pretty big - or would the issue of no exhaust fans prevent using one....just a thought.

DC
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #14 of 20
Thread Starter 
I thought about the electric frying pan, but we have no exhaust fans to speak of. I was wondering if this would be do able just to cook some meats and brown some veggies? But if not i could always go the micro wave technique.
post #15 of 20
Don't mess around with a microwave, just go with a 5litre crock pot or 2. They are cheap and will keep you soup warm after it has cooked.
post #16 of 20
Have you considered an induction cook top. Not the cheapest way to go but you could use it for everything you will need to prepare. Such as meats and vegetables.
post #17 of 20
Thread Starter 
I am still not sure if i can use any kind of cooking device such as a burner or cook top with out ventilation? Can anyone chime in on this?

A commercial crock pot could do the trick too!

What would be best a cook - n -serve or crock pot?
post #18 of 20
turkey roasters/ovens?

I would agree, you should prolly ask the health inspector because in alot of towns there is a code about ventilation and even grease traps and drains in the floor...
post #19 of 20

Are you saying that cooking soup at a home kitchen and transporting to the shop would be a code violation?

What if the home cooker had a three sink kitchen and got inspected?

post #20 of 20

Impossible to say for all locations but in my experience the odds are yes it would not be permissible as it is almost impossible to get a home kitchen inspected and or rated for commercial use. Usually takes a dedicated separate facility.

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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