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How Do You Make a Good Horseradish Sauce?

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
I love good, strong horseradish, and it would be wonderful to get a recipe and technique for making a good, flavorful horseradish sauce. Can you help out?

Shel
post #2 of 19
One way I make it is grating fresh horseradish into beshamel sauce with a little salt, lemon juice,pinch of sugar.

With boiled beef it is traditional (in Austria/Germany) to mix fresh grated horseradish with grated apples or what I like more, poach the apples first with a little sugar, cinnamon, nutmeg, lemon zest, puree with a fork, so it is chunky, then add the grated horseradish.

Or whipped cream with a pinch of salt, fresh grated horseradish folded in (love this with short ribs)
post #3 of 19
Fresh grated horseradish
Sour cream
Heavy Cream
Mayo
Salt
Pepper
Lemon, fresh

Dash of fresh black pepper
post #4 of 19
Got this recipe from Penzy's this past Saturday ...

1/2 C heavy cream or whipping cream
3-4 T prepared horseraddish (you can grate your own if you choose)
1 T lemon juice
1 tsp chopped fresh herbs (parsley & chives)

Whip cream until soft peaks form. Fold in remaiing ingredients. Cover and refrigerate. Best made a day ahead and will keep for several days.
post #5 of 19
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the ideas, gang. Anybody got some more suggestion?

Shel
post #6 of 19
Hi Shel,

I can give you some chemistry insight to help you in making the best sauce you can make.

Wasabi, mustard seeds and horseradish are all in the same plant family and all contain a defense chemical in their tissue to repulse insect attack.

When the plant is damaged by eating insects, two separated compounds mix and react. These are sinigrin and an enzyme. The sinigrin is converted to allyl isothiocyanate. This last compound is a strong irritant and, when purified, was the major component of mustard gas during WWII.

For the culinary angle now: The pungency of the condiment made from these plants varies according to the technique.
For example mustard: ground mustard seeds, water and vinegar are the most active components of prepared Dijon mustard. If water and vinegar combined are added the mustard seeds the mustard will be mild, If you add the water first then wait 15 min before adding the vinegar the mustard will be strong and pungent. The reason: the reaction will take place in water but will be halted by the acid. If left too long in water, the compounds degrade and become mild and bitter. Also heat destroys the allyl isothiocyanate which is the reason why plain yellow prepared mustard is mild.

So time and order of ingredients are factors to remember when making horseradish sauce, mustard and wasabi.

Hope this helps!
Luc H
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post #7 of 19
Luc,

I was under the impression that Dijon's unique flavor came from white wine as the liquid. Is that incorrect?

I don't know the chemistry. But I do know that mustard flavor and heat levels are definately affected by the liquid used.

Everything else being equal, you will get different pungency levels based on whether you choose water, vinegar, wine, or beer as the liquid component.
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post #8 of 19
Hi KYH,

water is still a major ingredient in Dijon Mustard. Water and mustard seed flour are first added to make the reaction. At a specific time, the wine is added (including citric acid or sometimes white or even wine vinegar). I think the wine may stop the reaction as well as vinegar.
Of course wine is also a flavouring compound.


Luc H.
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post #9 of 19
If you are looking for the basic cream horseradish sauce, you can boost the intensity with a splash of nam pla or minced anchovies. If you are interested in a different style horseradish sauce, here is a recipe that I have used on seafood.

Horseradish Tomato Vinaigrette
1/4 cup rice wine vinegar
2 roma tomatoes, seeded
1 tablespoon horseradish, grated
1/4 shallot, diced
1/2 tablespoon honey
3/8 cup olive oil
1/8 cup parsley, chopped
to taste sea salt
to taste black pepper, ground

Combine vinegar, tomatoes, horseradish, shallot, and honey in a blender. Pulse and then with machine running on medium speed slowly add oil. Fold in parsley and season with s&p.
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post #10 of 19
If you are looking for the basic cream horseradish sauce, you can boost the intensity with a splash of nam pla or minced anchovies. If you are interested in a different style horseradish sauce, here is a recipe that I have used on seafood.

Horseradish Tomato Vinaigrette
1/4 cup rice wine vinegar
2 roma tomatoes, seeded
1 tablespoon horseradish, grated
1/4 shallot, diced
1/2 tablespoon honey
3/8 cup olive oil
1/8 cup parsley, chopped
to taste sea salt
to taste black pepper, ground

Combine vinegar, tomatoes, horseradish, shallot, and honey in a blender. Pulse and then with machine running on medium speed slowly add oil. Fold in parsley and season with s&p.
Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #11 of 19
For roast beef:
Horseradish drained of water
Tabasco to taste
Worcestershire to taste
S&P
Chopped fresh Thyme
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post #12 of 19
2 teaspoons mayonnaise
1 cup sour cream
3 tablespoons commercial horseradish
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 scant teaspoon sugar

Stir together all ingredients until smooth. Cover and chill for 4 hours or overnight. Serve as a dip or with corned beef.
Makes about 1 cup of horseradish sauce.
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post #13 of 19
Horseradish sauce - English style

1 teaspoon made up English mustard
1-2 tablespoons white wine vinegar
salt and freshly ground black pepper
200ml double cream Method


Cut a large of thick horseradish root. Wash thoroughly, then using a sharp knife, peel. Grate it fine - like Parmesan.

Measure the finely grated horseradish into a mixing bowl - don't worry if you are not exact, you can always add more later. Mix in the mustard, vinegar, salt and pepper, followed by the cream. Whisk until it forms very soft peaks then chill or serve as required. It will thicken further if left to sit.

VARIATIONS:

You can replace the cream with creme fraiche.
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What is patriotism but the love of the food one ate as a child? ~Lin Yutang
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post #14 of 19
Thread Starter 
Wow! Thanks for all the suggestions and information. Sorry for not replying sooner to individual messages - somehow I wasn't getting email notification of the posts. Thanks, Thanks, Thanks!

Shel
post #15 of 19
Thread Starter 
What is "comercial horseradish?"

Shel
post #16 of 19
Shel, I think Mitmondel means horseradish from a jar, already prepared.

Is that right, Mitmondel? (By the way, with what do your like your almonds? :D)
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post #17 of 19
Thread Starter 
Oh, OK ... I thought it might mean something else. That's what is often referred to as prepared horseradish. Thanks.

Shel
post #18 of 19
1QT white wine, 1pt chix stox, reduce by half. add equal parts (1C each) of creme fraiche and prepared horsey. Blend on high speed until smooth, add 1C heavy cream and reduce UDC is acheived
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post #19 of 19
Yeah, the prepared horseradish is basically grated horseradish mixed with vinegar (and possibly seasonings), usually sold in jars.
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