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Parts for chicken stock?

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 
Hey all-

Been planning on stashing another batch of stock, since the canned broth thing is getting old.

On browsing the supermarket today, I found a 5# bag of chicken necks for $3. So I grabbed one and marched out. I clued in when the cashier said, "Going fishing?" "Er... no, why?" "Well, you bought a big ol' bag of bait..."

Can these be used in stock? Or is that why they were on sale in the first place? ...because they're useless?
post #2 of 21
Oh, they make great stock! After all, they are bones and meat. AND they have connective tissue in them that adds body to your stock.

If you want to make a brown chicken stock, roast them first. Otherwise, just use them as you would other chicken parts.

(They were probably so cheap because not everybody is as smart as you, ;) and they all think the necks are only good for bait. :lol:)
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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post #3 of 21
Unless there's something wrong with them, such as they are old and on the verge of spoiling, they're just fine for stock. I get and save necks whenever possible. I wish I could get good quality necks for such a great price.

Shel
post #4 of 21
Thread Starter 
Hmmm... they had a bunch of 'em. Better run back in the AM and get some more. :bounce:
post #5 of 21
Love the chicken necks for stock.

G.
http://www.legourmet.tv
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http://www.legourmet.tv
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post #6 of 21
My dad used to enjoy nibbling on chicken necks, and I sometimes do as well.

Merle Ellis, in his book "Cutting Up in the Kitchen," has a recipe for stuffed chicken necks that looks interesting.

His book was written in the 1970s, and the prices for meat and other things are outdated, so you;ve got to put this into perspective. He gave himself a challenge to produce a dinner for four people for under $1.00, and he did - 93-cents - using chicken necks.

shel
post #7 of 21
Definitely roast'em first.
post #8 of 21
And if you want really good stock and even MORE stupid remarks from the ignorant checker, buy some chickens' feet, too.
post #9 of 21
What about chicken heads and cocks' combs? I believe chef Judy Rodgers suggests usung the heads. Feet are very good for stock and broth.

shel
post #10 of 21
Definitely all of the 'off' parts; feet are easy to get here, as are backs. Heads and combs are a special request at my local organic butcher shop, really cheap and they make a great stock... of course after a roasting first.


G.
http://www.legourmet.tv
Free video website for all things food, wine, beer, cheese... Check it out!
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http://www.legourmet.tv
Free video website for all things food, wine, beer, cheese... Check it out!
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post #11 of 21
Despite the checker's comment---which I do not think was at all snooty---I can offer a guess why they were so inexpensive.

Look at Blue Dogz' location, at the top of Chesapeake Bay. Chicken necks are commonly used there for crab bait. Now that the season is all but wound down, there probably isn't much call for them. So they've been priced to sell.

Wish I was close enough to grab a bag or two at that price. Then, on my annual crabbing trip next season, I'd be all set.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #12 of 21
What animals do you bait with chicken necks?

Luc H.
I eat science everyday, do you?
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I eat science everyday, do you?
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post #13 of 21
Crabs, Luc. Didn't I say?
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #14 of 21
sorry my dyslexia is acting up again....
(actually your reply was not there when I posted mine...)
Luc H
I eat science everyday, do you?
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I eat science everyday, do you?
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post #15 of 21
Turkey necks make excellent stock too, & can be had cheap.

Re chicken feet: I seem to remember reading that they needed to be prepped somehow - skinned or peeled or something - before being used in stock. I read that after I had used a batch of them in stock (which turned out very nicely anyway). Anyone know of chicken foot protocol apart from washing & roasting?

I am not a squeamish guy, and chicken feet on in their natural state are not really very cute, except perhaps to other chickens, but I have to say - after they've been simmered for 6 hours or so, they are just about the ghastliest things I've ever seen. Like the little hands of drowned baby devils.

I'll use 'em again,though.
The genesis of all the world's great cuisines can be summed up in a four word English phrase: Don't throw that away.
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The genesis of all the world's great cuisines can be summed up in a four word English phrase: Don't throw that away.
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post #16 of 21
I was just shooting in China last week (and the week before) and the crew all ate a broth that was just chicken feet and cocks comb. The feet are pulled out of the broth and eaten whole--> really tasty, after you get past the North American squeemishness of eating idetifiable parts.

But I digress.

G.
http://www.legourmet.tv
Free video website for all things food, wine, beer, cheese... Check it out!
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http://www.legourmet.tv
Free video website for all things food, wine, beer, cheese... Check it out!
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post #17 of 21
The Frugal Gourmet - of sainted memory :rolleyes: - recommended roasting beef bones for stock at 400 deg for two hours (and keeping an eye on them toward the end,) He just said to boil chicken parts, but I don't know why they wouldn't benefit, too.

James Beard recommends 450 degrees for the beef, and he adds almost an equal amount of gizzards to his chicken parts - backs and necks - for stock. He also doesn't call for roasting the chicken.

Mike
travelling gourmand
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travelling gourmand
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post #18 of 21
Also good raw for dog food, if it isn't sketchy looking.
Outside of a dog, a book is a man's best friend. Inside of a dog it's too dark to read. - GM
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Outside of a dog, a book is a man's best friend. Inside of a dog it's too dark to read. - GM
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post #19 of 21
Whenever I get chicken necks, some are saved fpr my cat. I cleaver the necks ito appropriately-sized pieces so he can knaw on them a little. They make a perfect treat or snack, as the potassium (phosphorus)/calcium balance is ideal. Buddy's 9 years old and his teeth are perfect - never needed any dental work. The bones hep keep his teeth in good shape.

Are you a proponent of the BARF diet?

shel
post #20 of 21
Industry tidbit:

Chicken necks, carcasses, feet, wings (although they are expensive now because of demand) are used to make MDM: mechanically deboned meat.

The parts are crushed/ground in a wicked machine then the slurry is pushed through a screen where the bone fragments are retained but the fat and meat passes through.

MDM is used for hot dogs in particular but also for nuggets and the like.

Luc H.
I eat science everyday, do you?
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I eat science everyday, do you?
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post #21 of 21
Why, yes. Yes I am. That's how I read about the chicken necks.
Outside of a dog, a book is a man's best friend. Inside of a dog it's too dark to read. - GM
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Outside of a dog, a book is a man's best friend. Inside of a dog it's too dark to read. - GM
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