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Cooking on the go

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
Ok i'm sure this is not the first time this has been asked, but if your really on the go and want to eat healthy, how do you go about it ?
I'm cultured, i eat my donuts with a folk & knife !!!
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I'm cultured, i eat my donuts with a folk & knife !!!
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post #2 of 12
Give us more details about distances and times.

For one thing, you can cook on your engine as you drive, depending on your engine layout. Get Dian Thomas' book Roughing it Easy for details If in doubt, talk to your mechanic about where your exhaust manifold is, what clearance there is and so forth. Stay away from the catalytic converter.

Yes, I'm serious.

And there's always fresh fruit and vegies, dried fruit and so on.

But avoid eating behind the wheel. It's not safe.

Phil
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #3 of 12
The easiest way is to always carry your own food with you. That way you won't be at the mercy of whatever is available, can eat when you need to (not have to wait until you're so hungry you can -- and do -- eat everything available), and know exactly what it is you're eating.

You might kick when I say that's easiest, but really, it doesn't take much effort to shop for vegetables and minimally processed foods, then prep and pack them the night before to take with you. If you carry around a water bottle -- it's even less effort to carry a container with a salad and a couple of hard-cooked eggs, or whatever you like to eat.
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
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post #4 of 12
Planning out meals and carrying them with you (either ready to eat, or prepped and ready to cook) is the most sensible way. That also includes planning to stop at farmers and central markets for the freshest of local foods.

We used to put on 40-45,000 road miles a year, and always carried our own food for that reason. We also devised a "picnic basket" that suited us. Looked at numerous commercial ones, and nothing was quite right in terms of the plates, drinking glasses, flatware, etc.

A lot depends, too, on how much time you want to spend on meal prep. Did you see that Emeril episode that featured the truck driver who grills everywhere? Amazing what you can accomplish with a portable grill, some charcoal, and a little imagination. That guy even jury-rigged a pizza stone from a flowerpot drip plate.

Although we rarely grilled while on the road, we did carry a single-burner propane stove, and did plenty of cooking in (not legal, btw) and outside our motel rooms. Sometimes it was actual cooking. More often it was meals we'd prepared at home and sealed in boiling bags. Then it was a matter of heating water and dropping the bags in.

I'm sure if you provide more details as to the kind of travel you'll be doing and the kinds of foods you like, we can provide more detailed answers.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #5 of 12
When you say "on the go" does that mean literally travelling or does it mean having a hectic schedule?

Jock
post #6 of 12
cooking multiple meals at one time.....shop once, cook for a few hours....have food for 5-7 days.
or hire someone to personal chef for you.
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #7 of 12
shroomgirl -sounds like you're bucking for the job? hehe j/k :lol:

But seriously.... I agree - Hmmsosogood is that what you meant by "on the go"? If you do...here goes...

We're pretty hectic here too, with lots of mum's taxi after work and other half working late, I make double when I'm able, and freeze or use in a different way the next night or night after, e.g. a meat sauce I make a double batch, make it into spag. bog. the first night, then another night I'll use it as a shepherd's pie/lasagna or similar. Stews can be made in bulk and frozen, and you can load them up with healthy veg. and pair with starches/grains etc when using, turn them into curries - experiment!

And soups, make a huge pot of a basic soup, use it/ freeze it in batches and add different things to vary it each time, e.g. a basic chicken soup, add noodles one time, fresh veg. another, or if its running low, stretch it by using a good tinned soup, etc etc

Tinned foods such as tomatoes or corn kernels, and frozen veg like peas etc, can be a great time saver and good quality and add flavour and are healthy too. Pasta takes no time at all and you can whip up a healthy sauce while its cooking - 15 mins tops. Just a matter having ingredients on hand - as shroomgirl said - shop once a week not several times, get all you need then and to your larder topped up, especially with the staple foods and fresh fruit and veg.

With your meats, stir fries are a great healthy option. Chicken is good and easy, so is lean pork, and stir fry beef strips. After your weekly shop you can take a bit of time and slice up the meat into meal size lots and freeze - also the marinade if any can be added at that time and it will start working while its freezing. Just remember to take out of freezer in the morning and pop into fridge, or if you have a microwave, can defrost in there. Frozen shrimp are also good - defrost under running water the amount that you need from the pack, seal the rest up and pop back into freezer.

Keep a good supply of sauces on hand (check ingredients first to see they meet your requirements for salt, fat etc). They add good variety to your meals and save making one from scratch.

Salads - have things like red onions, bell peppers, mushrooms, lettuce, cucumbers on hand - takes little time to chop and whip up a nice salad, boiled eggs, tinned tuna, have a fat free mayo/ french/italian dressing in stock - 5 mins and its good to go.

Breads - tortillas, multi-grain, all can extend a meal nicely and supply a very quick starch portion to your meal without having to bother with potatoes etc.

Anyhow - I'll give someone else a turn - I'm a fanatic when it comes to saving time in the kitchen - can you tell? Hope something in here has helped.

DC
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #8 of 12
things that freeze well--sauces, noodles, rice. In sealable bags.

Sunshine, nice to see ya here
post #9 of 12
oops, double post
post #10 of 12
I also got some good advice before about lunch when I'm at work driving my van and stop in the middle of nowhere.

Pasta salads and great sandwich ideas for a lunch from my cooler.
post #11 of 12
Hey there to you to Yeti :)

Hmmsosogood - forgot to mention fruit - apples, bananas, oranges, mandarins, pears, grapes etc - all come prepackaged and portable, very healthy, affordable, and the best of all -EASY!!

Dried fruit too - apricots, peaches, pears, figs, sultanas - either on their own as a snack, or add into other dishes, or a nice stewed fruit compote. Keeps for days, try it with greek yoghurt as a topping - very, very nice.

Nuts are a good addition or snack also - pine nuts, almonds, cashews - the list is endless, as are their uses. Mix with dried fruits for a quick snack pack when you're on the run.

Enough from me - Cheers!

DC
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #12 of 12
Thread Starter 
I just have a very hectic schedule due to work and always running around trying to get things done. I've tried protein bars and snack bars and those do not cater to my taste buds at all. I travel once in a while but in cases like that, I make sure I have enough cash with me so I can make stops to eat at restaurants. But once I'm at restaurants, I don't think about the food as much 'cause I'm too busy looking at the interior of the place... call me wierd but that's what I'm into. Interior Designing and shows like "Design Star" that just premiered with it's second season just interest me too. It airs every Sunday @ 9pm on HGTV. Does anyone keep up with that show?

Other than shows like Everyday Italian (Giada De Laurentiis) and Semi-Homemade Cooking (Sandra Lee), design shows are interesting. They're also doing these sweepstakes you should check out through HGTV's website.
I'm cultured, i eat my donuts with a folk & knife !!!
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I'm cultured, i eat my donuts with a folk & knife !!!
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