ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › Could this kill someone?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Could this kill someone?

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
Hi everyone, this is my first post so please be kind. =)

My new boss and I are arguing over food safety. She brings in fresh chicken and marinates it. Normal, right? But then she tells me that she uses the same marinade for 3 weeks. So, if I add fresh chicken to the marinade bucket today, won't there be bacteria from chicken from 3 weeks ago still in there?! I told her that I didn't think that was very safe but she told me the vinegar and salt kills the bacteria. Can anyone help me out here? IS this safe or not? I appreciate your help.
post #2 of 13
The USDA says it is not safe.

"Marinating
Chicken may be marinated in the refrigerator up to 2 days. Boil used marinade before brushing on cooked chicken. Discard any uncooked leftover marinade."

Focus On: Chicken
post #3 of 13
Add to that, the link to the info from the USDA:

Focus On: Chicken

............
post #4 of 13
Wow, thanks, Free Rider -- great to know about that site!

Dealshaker -- you're right, she's wrong, and you can tell her we said so, along with the USDA. :eek: And now that you're here, welcome! That wasn't so bad, was it? :D
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
Reply
"Notorious stickler" -- The New York Times, January 4, 2004
Reply
post #5 of 13
You said it Suzanne! Personally, poultry, lamb, pork and seafood marinades were a "one and done" in ALL of my kitchens. Beef? Max was three uses or 1 week (after 1st use) which ever came first. I remember being told in culinary school that you could keep chicken in oil for up to three weeks.:confused: Never really bought into that ideal since there were way too many career/business/reputation ending variables.
post #6 of 13
Thread Starter 
Thanks you guys for your help. This woman had never even worked ina restaurant before opening one! When I voiced my concern about the chicken she said" Well my last chef actually had culinary training from Cordon Bleu and he said to do this." Ouch. I told her he must have flunked out. I'm going to print out the site you just gave me and show it to her and maybe she'll realize that although I never went to cooking school, I might know a little bit more than her when it comes to not getting her customers sick.
post #7 of 13
That's one restaurant I can live without. Yikes!
Ladybug all dressed in red,
Strolling through the flower bed.
If I were tiny just like you
I'd creep among the flowers too!
Reply
Ladybug all dressed in red,
Strolling through the flower bed.
If I were tiny just like you
I'd creep among the flowers too!
Reply
post #8 of 13

Um gross

Maybe you should tell us where this is happening so we can avoid it.

N
post #9 of 13
Don't make us send Luc over!

Technically though, you are cooking the chicken well done right?

OTOH, there are microbes growing in the marinade. You don't want a breeding ground for that stuff.
post #10 of 13
as much as i like the usda for keeping a standard on the foods we eat and making sure they are safe, it is necessary to mention that they do routinely take things a bit far.

for example, the USDA recommends that beef be cooked until the internal temperature of 145 degrees farhenheit for medium-rare..

in the restarant industry, 145 is medium. medium rare should be cooked until the temperature is between 135-140 degrees.

in addition to that, they pretty much dismiss beef carpaccio because it's raw and thereby, dangerous. BS in my opinion since i like beef carpaccio and it's an uneccessary precaution to say that it is dangerous.

that said, the marinade won't kill anyone if the chicken is cooked to 160 degrees and thereby, kill all bacteria.

however, it is gross because bacteria does grow despite salt and vinegar and if any uncooked marinade gets on anything, it's going to make someone very sick. also, the chicken juice inside the marinade is going to make the marinade get thicker and coagulate as the proteins denature. so you'll be marinading chicken in decomposing chicken liquid. this is usually a red flag for any health inspector because it's like keeping biohazardous material in the walk-in.
post #11 of 13
Tell you how you can tell. When the stuff starts walking it's time to toss it out.
post #12 of 13
Whether or not the USDA has overexagerated standards or not is not the issue. Common sense should be exercised at all times. But don't forget that somethings doesn't have to have an odor, off color, odd texture or feel to be bad enough to, if served to someone, have the Health department sniffing around your establishment for the 6-8weeks following the point you served it to a guest.

If some Chef, KM, Sous or JG (junior grade) Manager out there wants to take a chance and use something more often or keep something longer than recomended. Hey have at it. Just keep the resume close at hand.

For me I do try to use a lot of caution when it comes to raw meats. Especially Chicken! This stuff is covered in bacteria from day one. And since I'm not a big believer in irradition, caution is what I will observe. When in doubt throw it out! Words you Live or Die by. But for me the cost of a Culinary education (40,000) and the loss in salary (40-60,000yr) or revenue (30-80k a week) is a high price to pay for 3 bucks worth of marinade.
post #13 of 13
Dealshaker, please supply the name and address of this person...
(Just kidding)

I think I don't need to add to this thread... But as probably concluded, this practice is unsafe and like many unsafe things we do in our lifetime one day the inevitable will happen .... things will go wrong and somebody gets sick because a piece of chicken marinating in a week old marinade gets poked and contaminated with salmonella or something then served undercooked.

It's all fun and games until somebody pokes and eye out or the chicken....

Other then bacterial issues, the problem with reusing a marinade like this is the acidity and the flavours will decrease overtime. There would not be any product consistency. A mistake, I doubt, any chef would do.

Luc H.
I eat science everyday, do you?
Reply
I eat science everyday, do you?
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › Could this kill someone?