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Apples to Applesauce

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
Hi,

Now that the apple tree in the back yard has proven to have superb apples, I'd like to try making some apple sauce. What's the best way to prepare the apples for sauce? Peel, boil or simmer, then add spices and mush it all up, or is there a better way to prepare the apples - roasting perhaps?

Shel
post #2 of 10
Look at this:

How to make applesauce (directions, recipe, with photos and free)
post #3 of 10
Shel,

You'll need a food mill, if you don't already have one.

Then, cut the apples in quarters or slightly smaller. Put them in a large, heavy pot (like a stock pot) with a little water. Let them stew until very soft.

Pass them through the food mill to remove the seeds, skins, and hard parts of the core. That will give you your basic pulp.

Reheat the pulp and let it cook down to the thickness you want, adding any spices that suit your taste.

By adding a bunch of sugar, and letting it really cook down (stirring to prevent scorching) you can turn it into apple butter.

You should also learn how to can, and stock up appropriately with the necessary tools and equipment. Given the nature of the process, you just don't make a little apple sauce, and you'll need some way of storing it. Canning makes the most sense.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #4 of 10
Oh, yeah. If you like cinnamon, use the Red Hots rather than powdered cinnamon. They dissolve into the sauce, and infuse it more evenly than does the powder.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #5 of 10
Thread Starter 
Hi,

I wondered about needing a food mill. By peeling, seeding, and coring the apples first, and maybe cutting them into chunks, after cooking (by whatever method) it should be pretty easy to smoosh up the fruit, no? Would it still be neccessary to cook the apples further?

I was thinking of using little, or no, sugar, but maybe using a bit of cinnamon powder or perhaps adding some strawberries or a little honey should I want additional sweetness.

I'm not sure what Redhots are - some kind of candy maybe? I seem to recall something with a name like that from my youth.

Shel
post #6 of 10
My early afternoon prep girl gave some of her wild strawberry applesauce last year.

Her trick is making the large pot of applesauce and as she removes it from the heat adding a large package of sugar free Wild strawberry jello. Pretty color, slight strawberry flavor, and just sweet enough, and most important a great treat for my diabetic grandson; he loves it!

My afternoon project is going to be creating a plum and apple sauce with sugar free raspberry.
post #7 of 10
Thread Starter 
What does that do to the texture of the applesauce? Is that a better choice than using fresh strawberries, and, if so, in what way?

Shel
post #8 of 10
The texture is fine, as the gelaten performs the function that suger would if it was added and cooked down.

The gal that gave me the recipe has added strawberries to her applesauce also, and it's delicious.

Keep in mind we are making this recipe for diabetics (her husband, my grandson) because it doesn't require sugar. It's very good and doesn't taste like something made with a sugar substitute, important for the grandson as he was only diagnosed 18 months ago.

Suggest that you cook up a couple of apples in a small batch and add 1/2 of teaspoon or so to try it. It doesn't take much sugar free jello to sweeten the sauce.
post #9 of 10
Hey Shel,
I've never used a food mill with my applesauce...Peel, quarter and seed the apples, and cook as described, and they break down nicely...we don't spray our trees with anything, so tend to get some bugs in some of the apples, which is why I'm careful about peeling and cutting them up, so as not to add any critters to the sauce. Have made apple butter in the past as well, when there were lots of apples...as described above, but once the sauce was cooked, I put several batches in a large roasting pan and put it in a really low oven to cook down...less stirring as there's no direct flame.

Hope this helps...Have fun with it!

Micki
--o--o--o--o--o--o--o--o--
Micki, aka Pastry Maven

"Yom-yom-yooom, ze chocolad!"
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--o--o--o--o--o--o--o--o--
Micki, aka Pastry Maven

"Yom-yom-yooom, ze chocolad!"
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post #10 of 10
Thread Starter 
Thanks to everyone for your suggestions and ideas, some of which have been very interesting and, to my mind, very unusual, and all of which have been helpful.

Shel
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