ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Recipes › Chicken Salad Recipes Wanted
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Chicken Salad Recipes Wanted

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
It would be great to get a few more chicken salad recipe ideas. I don't have many CS recipes, and most that I've found on the web are pretty traditional. Anything a little out of the ordinary would be great.

Shel
post #2 of 16
A boiled dressing is wonderful for chicken salad. You mix it 50/50 with the mayo. It's not really boiled as it would curdle the eggs. It's sometimes called cooked dressing too.

There are a number of variations on this out there, but it's usually some dairy, eggs, and cider vinegar. Other additions often include some mustard powder, chicken stock and hot sauce. Sometimes some pickle juice is added to the vinegar.

I'm partial to Jeff Smith's variation but it's in many cookbooks, such as James Beard too. And on the web.

It's also good for potato salad.
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
Reply
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
Reply
post #3 of 16
We enjoy adding grapes (cut in half) and pecans to our chicken salad, but would enjoy some other variations to chicken salad. Ohh, I've also added a bit of 5-spice and slivered almonds and pineapple bits.
post #4 of 16
I came up with this recipe when I had an abundance of Aji Flor peppers, and wanted to stuff them. With or without the peppers it's a winner:

Chicken & Gorgonzola Salad

2 large chicken breasts, cooked & diced (I just poach them in a court-boullion type stock
1 cup red onion, chopped and caramelized
1/2 sweet red pepper, chopped fine
2 oz Gorgonzola, crumbled
3/4 cup mayo
Salt & black pepper to taste
Paprika for garnish
18 small sweet peppers (Aji Flor, Sweet Apple, Baby Bell, etc.)

Combine the first 7 ingredients.

Cut the shoulders off the peppers. Remove seeds and ribs. Wil.l with the chicken mixture. Sprinkle lightly with paprika. Top with shoulder pieces as caps, if desired.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
post #5 of 16
Thread Starter 
Now that looks nice, and it's certainly different.

Do you prefer Gorgonzola Piccante or Dolce for this recipe? Do you have access to good Gypsy peppers. They're now my "go to" red pepper in many instances.

Shel
post #6 of 16
I have a chicken salad recipe that is pretty simple to make and yet it is devoured each and every time I make it:

Golden raisins
curry powder
toasted almonds
mayo
minced celery
chicken should be shredded

very good on lightly toasted grain bread
post #7 of 16
Either will work, Shel, but I prefer the mountain, because I like the crumbles. Dolce blends into the mayo to form a creamy mixture. So it's just a matter of personal taste.

I'm not familiar with the Gypsy. Keep in mind that all I eat are locally grown varieties, 99% of them heirlooms (or at least open pollinated). So, unless one of our farmers' markets people are growing them, I'm not likely to see Gypsy.

If they're a full sized pepper (like, say, a standard bell) I would split them the long way, and just use half as a boat for this salad.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
post #8 of 16
Thread Starter 
post #9 of 16
"Gypsies are one of the first "heirloom" sweet varietals to come onto the late-summer, early-fall pepper scene. Though actually a hybrid, they are..."

Ummmmmmmm! I will be good. I will, I will, I...... No I won't! Did this guy's mother have any children who weren't idiots???

An heirloom vegetable variety, by definition, is open pollinated. There are no hybrid heirlooms. It just bugs me when so-called journalists jump on buzzwords with no understanding of what they mean.

Sheesh!

Shel,

Personally, for stuffed peppers---particularly cold salads---I prefer shapes that are self-standing and form cups. But the Gypsies could work laying on their sides.

From the Gypsy description, I would first fire-roast the pod, let it cool, and then stuff it with the chicken salad. I think that smoky, charcoal-charred undertone would contribute to the total flavor profile.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
post #10 of 16
Thread Starter 
That jumped out at me when I first read the article <LOL> However, regardless of the facts, the peppers are still pretty darned good. When I get some time, I'd like to talk with some of the growers about them.

Shel
post #11 of 16
Thread Starter 
One of the things I like about the Gypsies is that they are more condusive to being stuffed and eaten as a "finger food" which makes them a nice option in some situations.

Shel
post #12 of 16
That's pretty true about any of the frying types, Shel. They all have that long, tapered configuration. Some grow straighter and some have distinct curves would be the primary differences.

If anyone around you sells Jimmy Nardeno, try some, and see how they compare to the Gypsies.

But the small peppers also serve the same finger-food function. A big Sweet Apple, for instance, is maybe 1 1/2 inches in diameter and about the same height. Most are smaller. Stuffed with my CS they make a great appetiser tray.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
post #13 of 16
Thread Starter 
I can't even find mention of them with a Google search, even using a couple of different spellings. Got any ore information?

Shel
post #14 of 16
A friend of mine grows them, Shel. I'll check with him tomorrow and see what I can find out.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
post #15 of 16
I've sampled something very similar, and it was delicious! Basically what you use, plus apples and onions.
post #16 of 16
Thread Starter 
Just curious - do you consider this unusual or out of the ordinairy, or is it just something you like and wanted to share?

Shel
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Recipes
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Recipes › Chicken Salad Recipes Wanted