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Shooter chocolates

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
Has anyone ever seen a cone shaped chocolate that contains a shooter inside? I have, your suppose to bite off the pointed top and drink the shooter inside and then eat the chocolate. I've seen the molds before but i can't figure out how to encase a shooter inside? How would they make a bottom for it. I've seen them at a specialty chocolate shop in Montreal where they "hand make the chocolates" of course the girl behind the counter was for show only she knew absolutly nothing. Any one out there know how to accomplish this?
trulys
post #2 of 10
nope but I've used snobinettes with Chambord.
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #3 of 10
wouldn't you coat the mold with the chocolate, then add the liquor inside, then make the bottom for it?

You can temper your chocolate and cut the pieces to fit and with a little of the melted chocolate seal the shooter inside the cone?
Food may bring us together, but a CAKE makes it a PARTY!!
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Food may bring us together, but a CAKE makes it a PARTY!!
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post #4 of 10
It'd be pretty hard to pour a bottom with a fluid liquid to support the molten chocolate, maybe drop a cut-our piece on top of the booze and "weld" the seam with couveture, but any booze trapped between the cut out piece and the mold wall would render the "welding" useless ...

In Switzerland most confiseries have a Kirsch or Plum liquor praline: The liquor is mixed with a sugar syrup, then this is poured into a starch molds. Overnight the sugar crystalizes forming a crust around the booze, then this is removed from the starch bed, any traces of starch carefully brushed off, and enrobed in chocolate.
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #5 of 10
I have a picture tutorial on this but haven't been brave enough to try it.

When you pour the temp. chocolate between the steel bars on parchment paper and let it set a bit, you are able to actually cut the shapes you need. We did that, you can see the actual technique on Chocolate transfer sheet cut outs that we used to make the candies that I posted in the photo gallery.
Food may bring us together, but a CAKE makes it a PARTY!!
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Food may bring us together, but a CAKE makes it a PARTY!!
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post #6 of 10
Thread Starter 
The problem of putting a bottom on a liquid that can't be hardened is exactly what i'm talking about. Now the idea to cutout a bottom probably would work if i had all the filled chocolates still in their molds cut out a tempered but slightly softened piece using the bottom of a piping tip slightly larger than the mold and like you say weld it together. that just seems like a lot to do for each chocolate how can that be cost effective? Foodpump, how do they pick up the starch coated crusted booze? i can't see how it would make a thick enough crust to facilitate handling and dipping and if one accidently broke in the dipping chocolate that chocolate is toast.
post #7 of 10
It's not starch crusted booze. See, the booze is mixed with a sugar syrup and poured into a starch mold. The sugar syrup crystalizes and forms a crust, the booze separates from the syrup as it crystalizes, the starch is only there to hold the shape until the crust forms.
It's an ancient technique, like casting steel or iron, except you do it with cornstarch and gummy bear filling. Starch molding is pretty much obsolete now, since the new silicone molds came out onto the market.

A thought occured to me, cone shape, eh? So you fill the cone say, 2/3 full of booze and drop a pre-cut bottom down, the cone shape will stop the bottom from contacting the liquid, then you could seal with a heat gun or "weld" with tempered couveture.........
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #8 of 10
my picture tutorial on the KIRSCH candies is to make a corn starch filled box, press a plastic mold that you purchase into the cornstarch. pour a little of your prepared liq. into the cavities, sprinkle them with some more cornstarch and let them sit.

You remove them very carefully.

and cover them with the chocolate....If I remember correctly.

Now, I will go hunting for that book with those instructions, maybe I can post the tutorial for you. ( all depending on my finding the time and the book!)

I was also thinking that you can make your hollow shells and with a flavor injector, you can fill each of your hollow chocolates with your liquids and then just seal the "injection" site and be done!
Food may bring us together, but a CAKE makes it a PARTY!!
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Food may bring us together, but a CAKE makes it a PARTY!!
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post #9 of 10
You can successfully cap a filled mold with piped chocolate if you work in a spiral from the outside, the chocolate will "float" to an extent. You have to pipe quickly and leave the molds somewhat under filled. This works best with a thicker liquid such as a coulis.

Foodpumps technique though rather archaic is a very good one and seldom used these days, the idea is to have your mixture partially crystallized, the cornstarch helps to accomplish this by drying the surface. After enrobing the crystallized form in chocolate, the moisture % is high enough to then re-melt the sugar after a day or so.

Here is the recipe for both ways, Filled chocolate molds and the cornstarch method.

750 g sugar
250 ml water
1 tsp or 5 g glucose
Cook until 110-112 C'

Cover with a damp towel then a lid. Let this cool for 5 or so minutes.
Pour your desired liquor into a clean bowl 250 ml for less sweet liquors Like Cognac and up to 325 ml for something like Cointreau.
Slowly pour your syrup mix over the liquor and then into a second container. Pour the mix back into the first container.

Let the sugar syrup cool to 95 degrees then you can slowly pour it into lined chocolate molds, do not fill them up all the way though.

First things first, you need to dry a quantity of cornstarch sufficient for your needs, this is best done in a low oven 60 C' for a FEW DAYS.
Sift this well and keep airtight.

When your molds are filled warm the cornstarch and sift it over the top of the chocolates about 1-2 mm thick. Let this sit at room temp for 24 hours. Carefully brush off the cornstarch and cover the tops like regular chocolates do not break through the crust.

If you want to mold them in cornstarch you will take a square cake mold and fill it with the dried cornstarch that has been reheated to 150 C', pack it in well and level the top. Now press in your mold shape and carefully remove it, repeat this as much as necessary to fill your form. Now fill this with your syrup (in this case the syrup must be hot) Sift the cornstarch over the top until it is 1 cm thick. Let this sit 3-4 hours then carefully flip it over, let it rest for 2 days. Turn the container over again and carefully remove the candies, brush the cornstarch off carefully and dip them in chocolate.


Simple really. Have fun.
Fluctuat nec mergitur
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Fluctuat nec mergitur
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post #10 of 10
Thread Starter 
Ok, I get it with the cornstarch mold, i actually do that at Easter for marshmellow eggs i never really thought about it for other things though, so thanks. The chocolate molds i've seen are poly carb i believe and the point is down at an offset angle. These were the exact ones this shop used, so enclosing the "top" which turns into the bottom of the chocolate when unmolded was what i was wondering about. But i believe i could do it by using the crystalized method Rat was suggesting. Thanks Rat and Risque great suggestions and i'm going to keep a mental note of that rather "archaic" method for other uses, funny how if we're not in that mind frame we forget what we already know to apply it elsewhere.
Thank you everyone for your input, trulys
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