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Eggs and Bacteria question

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
Hi everyone,

I have been a lurker on your forums for quite some time but figured it was high time that I introduced myself (I will do a proper introduction in the proper thread momentarily) :D

As suggested by someone on the forum, I just purchased 'The Cake Bible' and it looks absolutely fabulous! I am all set to try out a cake recipe and a buttercream icing. I have a question for you all before I begin, though. In the classic butter cream icing recipe it calls for 6 egg yolks. Does adding the hot syrup/sugar liquid to the eggs actually "cook" them enough to prevent salmonella bacteria from growing? I am planning on serving this recipe at a 50th wedding anniversary party and would hate to cause an outbreak of food poisoning! :D

Thanks so much for allowing me to join such a wonderful community. I look forward to your replies!

Sherry
post #2 of 16
SHERRY;
Good morning to you. As you know eggs scramble at 180 degrees. The syrup that you will be mixing in should be heated 238/245 degrees.Soooo!!
I would think this info should answer your question young lady. I hope your party goes well & enjoy the rest of the day.

Z~BESTUS.:chef:
post #3 of 16
Hi Sherry,

Short answer, you’ll be fine!

Time, Temperature, Food source and Moisture are important things to think about when it comes to bacterial growth. One of the factors in this particular issue is available moisture. Very little is available in the icing.

This is why honey doesn't support much in the way of bacterial growth. It is stored at room temperature for months and is full of food for bacteria, but not enough available moisture to support bacterial growth even though it is in a liquid state.

Since you are using the Italian method for the butter cream, you are using the safest method anyway!
Have fun!
SGMChef

Don't take my word for it! I wouldn't trust me either!
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Have fun!
SGMChef

Don't take my word for it! I wouldn't trust me either!
Reply
post #4 of 16
Thread Starter 
Thank you both so much for your replies! I sincerely appreciate you taking the time to answer my question and to put my mind at ease. :D

I have just baked, from 'The Cake Bible', the 'All Occasion Downy Yellow Butter Cake' (as cupcakes) and they turned out beautiful. The classic butter cream icing also turned out very nice (in my opinion). My son LOVED it but my daughter hated it. I was hoping for a 2 for 2 on this one - dang!

This was my first time using an icing that did not call for confectioners sugar (which I don't really care for) and I was so surprised to find the texture so light and fluffy (just like whipping cream)! I will keep this recipe handy for another occasion perhaps but for now, I'm on the hunt for a different icing, something that would be fabulous atop the Downy Yellow Buttercake.

-Sherry
post #5 of 16
In keeping with the general theme of this thread, I have another question regarding 'egg safety'.

I have heard a number of the performers on the food network refer to "pasturized eggs", as a safe alternative to "raw" eggs in mayonaise and other recipes. However, I have yet to see these in the grocery stores in my area. Are these supposed to be available to the general public, or only through commercial channels?
"The pressure's on...let's cook something!"
 
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"The pressure's on...let's cook something!"
 
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post #6 of 16
Mostly wholesale,I have seen small containers in some gourmet and specialty stores. Also if I am not mistaken I think Egg Beaters plus egg are pasteurized, if you want to use these.
CHEFED
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CHEFED
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post #7 of 16
Thanks, Ed. :)
"The pressure's on...let's cook something!"
 
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"The pressure's on...let's cook something!"
 
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post #8 of 16
Just for the record, I have pasteurized eggs in the shell at my local Safeway store, but the neighboring QFC up the hill doesn't have them. Anyway, they do exist.....it may just take a quick request to your local store manager to carry them.
post #9 of 16
Have never heard or seen past. eggs in the shell.
I would truly love to know the process. Since they are subject to this process I would think they would cook to some extent, or is the egg bombarded with a ray, simular to the way they tried with ground beef?
CHEFED
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CHEFED
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post #10 of 16
here you go Ed.

SYSCO Imperial Pasteurized Shell Eggs - Products - Sysco Corporation

there is also Davidson Eggs who I e-mailed with this question, will let you know what I hear. Info not on their website.

Nan
post #11 of 16
here you go--
Hi Nan,

No beam thing -- it's just a warm water bath. All natural!

There's a video on our Web site that shows it. If you need any
additional information, let me know. I can send you some, or you can
check out the Web site further -- it's loaded with good information.

Thank you for your interest in Davidson's Safest Choice eggs!

Best regards,

Beth Patrick

Safeeggs

and I found this:
Davidson's Pasteurized Shell Eggs Begin U.S. Roll-Out; New Pasteurization Process Eliminates All Salmonella Without Changing Taste | Business Wire | Find Articles at BNET

Nan
post #12 of 16

Moved Thread

FYI
I moved the thread because as professionals, we know where to find things that non-professional may not have access to .

Keep the discussion going!

Thanks!
bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
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bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
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post #13 of 16
Thank You always looking to learn more about food tech.
CHEFED
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CHEFED
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post #14 of 16
I get Davidson's pastuerized eggs at local Publix supermarkets. Davidson's eggs used to be packed in yellow styrofoam egg cartons but now their cartons are clear plastic (so I overlooked them when I was shopping in a hurry one week).
Vera
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Vera
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post #15 of 16

How should I wash my hens' eggs?

This thread is very interesting. I use eggs from my own hens (five laying at the moment). I wash the eggs in warm, lightly soapy water right after I collect them. The hens' bedding is kept clean and they are essentially free range, depending on the weather. Should I do anything more to ensure the safety of the eggs?
post #16 of 16
Not much else to do. When I had my flock of 18 the only thing that I was doing that you didn't mention specifically was inspecting and culling eggs. In other words if the egg shell didn't look perfectly free from damage, I pitched it out. The reality is that I probably threw away a lot of good eggs based on what I see in cartoons at the grocery stores.
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