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Deli Meat Slicer Needed

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
My dad has been dragging out this old beat up meat slicer from his parent's restaurant to cut the cold cuts for holidays and the darn thing is no longer sharp but its all we have. I want to get him a new meat slicer (so he can stop cursing on Christmas morning). I need a meat slicer like you see in the deli department at the supermarket but better. He's cutting up mostly Italian meats, proscuttio and coppocola etc. I know they are pricey so let me know a good brand and model and I will look for a gently used one. Thanks for the help!
-Christina

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-Christina

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post #2 of 18
Do you mean like a kitchen sized slicer? Depending on the model you may be able to get the blade shapened.
post #3 of 18
I just did a quick search on Ebay and Amazon and found a bunch from $40 to $1500. But like tsblo replied if you can get the blade sharpened you'd prabably save a bunch...watch the shipping on ebay though :suprise:
post #4 of 18
A "real" deli style meat slicer costs upwards of $3000.00 brand new--without any fancy attachments or gadgets. Get the blade sharpened. Most restaurant style slicers have a built-in sharpening wheels, hit the button for about 10 seconds with the motor running, and you have a sharp blade again. If the slicer you have is a popular model, you may be able to get a sharpening attachment for it, many popular slicers have replacement parts.
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #5 of 18
Emeril, We have a HOBART slicer in the deli where I work. They take a licking and keep on ticking. (hmm John Cameron Swaze:talk:) The girls drop them off there stands in the am and then drop 5-10 lbs of meat on them all day long. The only thing to give a problem as far as I can tell is the digital scale (to fix one is $800.00 for some circut board) I would check with an equipment wholesale place or even contact the markets in your area. Or contact the supplier, I bet they have factory reconditioned slicers. Be prepared to spend big on one of these,,, but then again it's is your dad !
Scott B
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As far as the Kitchen goes, it is a long, long day that is never really over, you just go home at some point
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Scott B
MISC

As far as the Kitchen goes, it is a long, long day that is never really over, you just go home at some point
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post #6 of 18
Thread Starter 
Frayed,

Thats exactly what I am looking for, my family believes that quality is worth every penny it costs so it's ok if that brand is expensive. My mom and I were looking into Hobart slicers and we need a good professional meat slicer, nothing "kitchen" sized considering we have the room (picture a professional kitchen but with cherry colored cabinets and granite counter tops instead of stainless steel). What models do you work with? We don't need the scale, my dad slices, lets it drop in his hand, then gives it to me to arrange on the meat tray.

And thank you to all those who recommended getting the blade sharpened, unfortunately, the dull blade is not the only thing on the old machine that gets my dad spouting four letter words.
-Christina

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-Christina

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post #7 of 18
mine is a univex 7512.....works very well.....cut paper thin red onions yesterday. Older model I bought at an estate sale for $750, was "supposedly" $2500 originally.
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #8 of 18
Start researching. Like I said, a decent 12" Hobart starts at $3,000, about the same for a Berkel, and after that come all the European models. Thing is, a Hobart is like a Chevy truck, you can't really kill it. Check out some of the Local restauarnt equipment dealer's repair dept's. If repairs are less than $500, go for it, if they're more, see if you can trade it in, Hobart parts are always salvageable
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #9 of 18
Thread Starter 
splendid! thank you! i am glad there is always the possibility of getting parts for the Hobart, it is impossible on the one we have now. can't wait to start my search...

-Christina
-Christina

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-Christina

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post #10 of 18

Restaurant equipment supplier

Here's a place that sells both new and used restaurant equipment, and I've found things at what seemed like decent prices. Restaurant Equipment, Used Restaurant Equipment, New. Pierce Food Service Equipment Co./Pierce chefs Mart
post #11 of 18
Seems to me that, if he's already got a commercial slicer, the best bet would be to take it in for sharpening/rebuild.
post #12 of 18
his name is christina....I'm thinkin' he is a she.
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #13 of 18
I'm thinkin' that, regardless of Christina's gender, his/her dad is most likely a he. ;)
post #14 of 18
Thread Starter 
My name is Christina, on this forum my name is emeril196, and I'm a "she". I signed my name to that last post because being referred to as "emeril" sounded odd to me...it's a nickname from my sorority sisters because I cook non-stop and they can't even boil water. I'm not a professional chef, I don't have a cooking show, but you can't pick your own nickname. You can refer to me as "christina"

My dad is a "he" and my mom is a "she"...

I just wanted to know about a slicer...a good slicer...

Thanks for all the information
-Christina

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-Christina

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post #15 of 18
Christina,
It sounds to me like you don't need more then a 10" slicer. Hobart is an older name but basically they are all going to suit your need with the seldom use. I would suggest going with a manual slicer without all the bells and whistles, the options tend to get busy and ugly looking with parts sticking out all over.
A manual with a removable sharpener will look a bit more slick in your setting.
I went with a 10" Globe for around 5-600. and have been very pleased.
FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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post #16 of 18
Thread Starter 
Panini,
would that be fine for frequent use as well? My dad wants to stop buying cold cuts all together and slice up his own hunks of meat but he avoids it because of the annoying slicer we have now which is also manual...it's very difficult to operate but then it is also 50+ years old (or so). Is your manual slicer difficult to use? Thank you!
-Christina

p.s. if I'm gonna drop a ton of $ on it, I might as well exhaust everyone's knowledge on the topic...
-Christina

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-Christina

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post #17 of 18
Manual slicers are a bit of a pain, but really you get use to it. Its all about having good anchoring, and being able to control the way you slice.

With myself when I slice, I make sure my foot is planted perpendicular to the slicer, The slicer is safely secured, and nothing is around or near me.
When slicing, I push forward with my arm, and roll forward following through the slice with my unplanted foot, smoothly. More body motion than just arm.

I use a technique similar to using a sliding compound miter saw essential.

Products: Food Preparation: Slicers: Light Duty

We have that light duty slicer at work that is used for salami and cheeses. It will cut roast and heavier cuts, and its fairly easy to keep clean.

At work we payed a nice 5400$cdn for it.
post #18 of 18
Christina,
Yes, they are made for daily use. I really think a 9" manual, well lubed, sharp, level at an appropiate height, would make your dad a happy camper.
They usually come with a manual and helpful hints, do's and don'ts.
ie. don't slice hard items like lemon,tomato, apple seeds that will pit and dull a blade and things of that nature.
Atlanta Fixture | Restaurant Equipment And Supplies | Restaurant Equipment Food Preparation Slicers / Graters / Shredders
Your Dad's a lucky guy,
pan
FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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