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Nouget question

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
Ok, my resturant season is coming to a close (we're only open 5 months/yr) so now i'm planning my winter hobby and it's chocolate makin( i do it every christmas for craft sales ) i can't open a buisness front yet,there isn't enough interest in artisanal chocolate making to sustain it. But my company is getting it's name slowly through the right circles so who knows maybe one day. Well anyway i want or need to make nougat ( it's a personal hill i must over come) and i want to be able to add this to my list of products i will sell this year chocolate dipped nougat and it uses up egg whites i've accumulated this year from all the ice cream i've made at the resturant.Now my question is every time i make it it turns an unslightly brown colour. I've used many different recipes from many very reliable sources and checked my temperatures accuratly. it tastes great, beautiful texture but not at all the colour i would expect. now i've read that using honey which has a lower boiling point can cause it to darken. my recipes use honey, i love the taste or honey in nouget i just didn't think it should get this dark. I'm sure with all the talented sugar artists out there, there should be some one out there who can help me either with a better recipe or letting me in on something i should or shouldn't be doing or adding. So i thought i would start to work on this before fall. Anyone out there that could help?
post #2 of 10
Use a two step process, boil the honey at a lower temp, around 125 C, add to the beaten whites. In the meantime have a second pot going with the sugar, glucose/corn syrup, and when it hits around 150 C. pour it into the beaten whites.

Don't have the recipie with me right now, but I'll post it today sometime
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #3 of 10
Taken from C.I.A's "chocolates & confections" by Peter Greweling:
This is probably the most comprehensive, intelligent, and informative book I have ever owned. It's worth the money and effort to get it.



dried eggwhites 10 gr
sugar 30 gr
fresh eggwhites 50 gr

sugar 380 gr
glucose syrup 120 gr
water 100 gr
vanilla bean, scraped 1


honey 230 gr


cocoa butter, melted 50 gr



Inclusions:

A total of 680 gr your choice of nuts, dried chopped fruit, etc.


mix dried eggwhites with sugar ijn a 5 qt mixing bowl, hydrate in fresh eggwhites for about 10 mins, but do not start mixing. Have your inclusions warm, preferably in a warm oven.

Combine the 380 gr sugar, glucose, vanilla bean, and water, and start off on a slow heat. Scale out the honey into a small pot and bring to 108 C, turn on mixer, continue cooking honey to 120C, now pour into the whipped whites and put the second pot on full blast. Let the mixer rip on high until the sugar is 155 C. remove the vanilla bean, pour into the whites and let the mixer go again on high for about 3 mins. Add in the melted cocoa butter , mixture will separate for a while but will bcome smooth after a few seconds of whipping. Fold in your inclusions and turn out onto rice paper or wafer paper, roll out to desired thickness, weight it, and let set overnight.

As the honey is cooked to a lower temp, you lower your chances of discolouring it, as well as preserving the delicate flavour of honey which probably would be lost at temps over 130 C.
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #4 of 10
i was debating whether or not to buy this book.. tell me, does it have a lot of ingredients that i'd have to special order(or have you had trouble finding ingredients)? and is it only in gram measurements? i really want to use it at work!
post #5 of 10
If you're serious about confectionary, you'll be using metric measurements. The whole world, with the exception of the US uses metric, and every baker the world over has been measuring by weight, not volume, long before the Egyptians were doing their graffitti thing on pyramid walls. Besides, metric is far more preicise, if the recipie calls for 6 grams, that's what it is, not some mickey mouse fraction of an ounce. Cups, pecks, quarts, scraped level with a pinch added teaspoons, and whatever are for eejits, imperial weights are stupidly confusing (16 units AS WELL AS 12 units in the same system, and then is that US gallons (128 fl oz) or Imperial gallons (160 fl oz)? Dealing with mickey-mouse flour measurements: Flour tapped down gently/pre-sifted then measured/packed down tightly, and then, those @#$% fractions and decimal equivilents of fractions!...) Besides, temps are dead-easy in metric, water boils at 100 C and freezes at O C, that's something that everyone can relate to.
But, yes, the book also gives imperial measurements, hope your scale can display imperial fractions.

Hard to obtain ingredients? I dunno, I can get a hold of pretty much anything, dried eggwhite seemed confusing at first, but it makes alot of sense, since in confectionary the goal is to get rid of as much water as possible to promote shelf life.
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #6 of 10
the reason why i like using oz. is because its faster. (for me anyways) im not really concerned about the difference between 6grams and 8 grams. if i was, i'd be scraping the sugar pots out more carefully and things like that. thats just the way it works for me at this particular job of mine.
i think i will buy the book.
post #7 of 10

re nougat

I'd love a fail-safe recipe for nougat too, to serve with the fruit platters at lunch. One with almonds would be ideal if anyone can help
"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?" Jo Brand
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"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?" Jo Brand
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post #8 of 10
(and it's chocolate makin( i do it every christmas for craft sales ) i can't open a buisness front yet,there isn't enough interest in artisanal chocolate making)

I am intrigued do you "make" the chocolate. ....... qahtan
post #9 of 10
Thread Starter 
Thanks Food Pump that was very helpful. I'm going to find that book as well i'm sure it would help me out a lot. I find a lot of good chocolate making books only are available in french so this sounds great. qahtan, as for your question, no i don't make the actual chocolate cause there are so many exceptional products i feel i would be reinventing the wheel. Now funny enough, my brother is actually working on making his own chocolate from cocoa beans. It's still alittle grainy so i've given him some suggestions, so i'll have to wait to hear how it went.
post #10 of 10

Making chocolate

I have a friend that lives in Hawaii and she has a cocoa tree in her garden and this year she had one pod on it ;-))) she said she wants to have a go at making chocolate, don't suppose she will get much, but hey, any is better than none atall. :-)) qahtan
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