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Ice cream

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
Hi everyone,

I just bought an ice cream machine and started to make many types of ice cream. However, i noticed that my ice cream tend to melt quicker than commercial ones. Is it because commercial ice cream have stabilisers and additives? If so, what are they.

I also would like to make ice cream with streaks of raspberry of chocolate in them. How do i do that? Do i fold in raspberry puree or melted chocolate after churning? Hope someone can help me.

Thank you.

rgds,
boychef
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Cook not because we have to, but because we like to!!"
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post #2 of 10
What recipes are you using? Are you starting with a créme anglaise?
post #3 of 10
Thread Starter 
Yup, i started with creme anglaise. thickened the cream and milk mixture with yolks.
Cook not because we have to, but because we like to!!"
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Cook not because we have to, but because we like to!!"
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post #4 of 10
A stupid question, but did you further freeze your ice cream after they went through the ice cream machine? Ice cream that just comes out of the machine is far warmer than the stuff that's been sitting in a properly working freezer.
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"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
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post #5 of 10
Also, I think using alcohol in the recipe can make ice-cream not freeze up as hard (not sure about that because I don't put alcohol in my ice-cream, so perhaps someone can confirm or deny).
post #6 of 10
well, the freezing point of alcohol is certainly lower than that of water. And I certainly haven't made streaked ice creams myself, but I'm guessing you're on the right track: After putting it through the churner lightly fold your other mixture into your ice cream (obviously not until the two elements are homogeneous) and then move to the blast freezer.
"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
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"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
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post #7 of 10
I concocted an ice cream (coconut mango curry) and used mango chunks, which I folded in after churning and before curing in the freezer.

Fold your fruit in before you put it in the freezer. Let us know how it comes out!
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post #8 of 10
Coconut mango and curry ice cream, how was it? I'm curious
I completely agree on the first 2 ingredients, but the curry part sounds bizarre to me. It reminds me this ice cream place I've been once, they have more than 200 different flavors, some of them are very unexpected !
post #9 of 10

I recently made spicy tomato ice cream - cooked the tomatoes down to paste with cinnamon, cardamom, cloves, turmeric, cayenne & fresh ginger; put that in a custard base with 1/3 whole milk, 1/3 heavy cream & 1/3 coconut milk.

 

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The genesis of all the world's great cuisines can be summed up in a four word English phrase: Don't throw that away.
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post #10 of 10

You definately need to freeze after churning to get is harder also are you churning it long enough?  Also when making your creme anglaise are you bringing it to the nape stage if not you will not get a thick enough base to make a good ice cream.

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