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What are some good textbooks?

post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 
Hey
casual learner
just wondering what text books you guys enjoyed ar thought were the best!?
American or not!
post #2 of 29
My students use On Cooking by Labensky and Hause. A bit technical, but well worth the investment of time and money.

Invention, my dear friends, is ninety-three percent perspiration, six percent electricity, four percent evaporation, and two percent butterscotch ripple

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Invention, my dear friends, is ninety-three percent perspiration, six percent electricity, four percent evaporation, and two percent butterscotch ripple

My Author Page

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post #3 of 29
Some of the Pro tomes mght be overkill for an at home cook but here are some of my favorites:

Escoffier Cookbook: There is a pretty good translation out there that has converted the old measurements to modern measures. If you get stuck with a direct translation it'll still work. Escoffier is especially good for learning how to make soups on the fly

La Repitoir de Cusine: Its a cheat sheet for French cooking. Can be very handy, but it is written in a culinary shorthand.

Larousse Gastromiqe: Its a cooking encyclopedia!

Anything by James Peterson: Especially buy Sauces Soups and Seafood vegetables. Those four books are incredible.

Professional Cooking by Wayne Gisslen: Its probally overkill for a home cook, but this is what I used in school, so I like it. You might prefer On Cooking mentioned in the above post.

For bread baking there is;

La Brea Bakery by Nancy Silverston
The Village Baker by Jose Ortiz
Those two should give you a pretty good overview of bread. You could also check out Peter Reinquist's books on the subject (Crust and Crumb, Bread Bakers Aprentice)
For cakes, Rose Levy Brennbaum (sp) has a really good book on the subject (The Cake Bible? Its been a while...)
post #4 of 29
Just to clarify,

On food and Cooking is Harold McGee's book.

"On-Cooking" is a culinary text that Jim was referring to.
Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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post #5 of 29
the on cooking book weighs a ton. but it does have a lot of info and pics where and when its needed
post #6 of 29
The Professional Chef 7th Edition CIA is a good textbook a bit technical for the average cook but good. Harold McGees book is a winner no matter how you look at it.
post #7 of 29
Fixed,Thank you cape chef.
post #8 of 29

Culinary Artistry

Culinary Artistry by Dorenberg and Page is always a great source of inspiration for me. Not so much a textbook or collection of recipies, but list of ingredients and pairings for them...hard to explain but every chef should have this book.
Keep those fires burnin'
 
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Keep those fires burnin'
 
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post #9 of 29
Any book by Dorenberg & Page should be on our shelves
Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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post #10 of 29
Thread Starter 
Thank you for taking the time to answer my question I will look at all of them but I think I'm leaning toward On Cooking
THANK YOU VERY MUCH!!:)
post #11 of 29
I am willing to give all my books away to somebody who is really going to use them, and put them to good use. They are books that I used while attending JWU. Great books with TONS of information.


Just let me know. U pay for the shipping and they are yours!

ChefTorrie
post #12 of 29
Hey!

Wow. What an offer. I'd love to put your old books to good use and will pay for shipping!!
post #13 of 29
Well I go to The CIA. And ive got a few good books. Im sure someone has mentioned, ofcourse, The Pro Chef from the CIA. its profected every 2 years. so thats deff. one id look into. Another ive found to be interesting is not only a Cooks Theusarus (Spellings Way Off) useful but a book called On Food and Cooking The Science and Lore of the Kitchen. Look into those 3.
"Some of us Cook. Some of us Grow. All of us Eat."
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"Some of us Cook. Some of us Grow. All of us Eat."
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post #14 of 29
I would have to agree with On Food and Cooking.
Outside of a dog, a book is a man's best friend. Inside of a dog it's too dark to read. - GM
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Outside of a dog, a book is a man's best friend. Inside of a dog it's too dark to read. - GM
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post #15 of 29

heres a really good book

for non professionals and professionals alike , its written in really easy to read language with great pictures that work really well visually
its "essentials of cooking" by James Petterson
when life hands you lemons, make lemon gelee, lemon meringue pie, or any other dessert your heart desires

www.theunknownchef.com
www.theunknownchef.co.nz
www.shoebridge.co.nz
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when life hands you lemons, make lemon gelee, lemon meringue pie, or any other dessert your heart desires

www.theunknownchef.com
www.theunknownchef.co.nz
www.shoebridge.co.nz
Reply
post #16 of 29
Thread Starter 
I have the professional chef but its not enough food science in it :(
post #17 of 29
wow please let me know what you have and how much you are looking at for shipping? right now im a student and poor but i cant pass this up so let me know what you have and let me know how much shipping would be
post #18 of 29
We are using the On Cooking book also. Any thoughts on thier On baking book?

Thanks,
Mike
post #19 of 29
Just thought I'd add my $0.02 into the fryer and list what's on my shelf:

* The Professional Chef 8th Ed.
* The Escoffier.
* On Food and Cooking.
* Larousse Gastronomique.

And general reading on the industry:

* Roasting in "Heck"'s Kitchen.
* Kitchen Confidential.
* The Nasty Bits.
* The Making of a Chef.
* The Soul of a Chef.


I've got tons of cookbooks, but the books listed above are great for the science and techniques behind cooking. Some are pricey as they are "textbooks" and I'm not sure why the Escoffier lists for $70 when my copy was $20. I created my list by first making the statement, "I do not want another book of recipes. I want to know how to cook."
"Honey, is something burning?" - my wife
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"Honey, is something burning?" - my wife
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post #20 of 29
Are the aforementioned books good for beginners? Or are they laced with "assumptions" that every amateur chef should know? As much as the books irritate me, the "Dummy" line of books usually treat everyone as if they are a true beginner, and that is what I am looking for.

Not that I am unintelligent...I just dont want there to be holes in my self-education.

Thanks

SR
post #21 of 29
Assumptions in what way? I think most cookbooks assume that you know how to cut, measure, season, and cook ingredients. I love flipping through a recipe and it says, "Cook until done." Huh? What's "done"? I think one is better served with a "Complete Techniques" type book (that one by Jaques Pepin).

"The Pro Chef" would likely be easier to read if you coupled it with live classroom instruction before diving in to the techniques it contains. But I can tell you, it gives many step-by-step photos of the stuff it's teaching. I followed the sauce Hollandaise recipe and it had photos of the sauce's consistency at each stage. I made for the first time and the resulting sauce was remarkably good for having never made it before. I now have panic attacks in the grocery store when I see those nasty Knorr's packets of powdered Hollandaise mix. :lol:
"Honey, is something burning?" - my wife
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"Honey, is something burning?" - my wife
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post #22 of 29
Valid assumptions would be, I can speak and write English, I know how to measure and cut "many" types of meat. Like you said though, I have no clue on how to properly prepare a Hollandaise sause...so a little hand holding and pictures are helpful.

Until I can move from the sticks to a larger metropolis that has a proper cooking institution...I want books that I can prepare my self for higher education...simply not recipe books. I will try some of the ones mentioned above.
post #23 of 29
CarlAird, you're interested in learning techniques to use at home, and you want stuff that's heavy on food science? I know it's not a textbook, but...isn't that book "CookWise" (by Shirley Corriher) all about the science behind home cooking? I don't own it...but I think she was doing the Alton Brown thing long before Alton came along...

I'm not a culinary student....but as someone who works part-time in professional kitchens, the most useful book I have is "Workplace Spanish: Restaurant & Food Service". And my Larousse concise English-Spanish/Spanish-English Dictionary.
post #24 of 29
I have the On cooking textbook 4th edition by Sarah R. Labensky, but i did not purchase the CD. Is it recommended to buy the CD? Any suggestions?? :D
post #25 of 29

Help me out in finding the best culinary school in New Zealand and U.K

hi friends...
i am rajesh shetty a 28 year old from india. i was not able to complete my final year of graduation and opted to join my fathers restaurant bussiness in india.After gaining 5 years of experience i decided to study culinary arts to enhance my knowledge. i joined a culinary school in india which offered a joint chef diploma in joint collaboration with a college in canada.i had completed my first semester in india and was suppose to complete the rest in canada But unfortunatly my visa was refused thrice.Now i would like to join a college in New Zealand or U.K . I would be really thankfull to you people,if you help me out in finding the best institute/schools in New Zealand and U.K .

with regards
rajesh shetty

post #26 of 29

Hi I can't see the date, have you given away all of your books, or do you have any left?  Do you have "On-Cooking"?

post #27 of 29

Ooo, glad I saw the Village Baker on your list. I came across it the other day at the used book store and was short a few bucks to buy it. I'm going to be picking it up though, I enjoyed how it was split into two sections with home baking yields/volumes and recipes tailored for the professional kitchen.

post #28 of 29

I just picked up the On Baking book for the pastry program that I'm in.  I'm doing both tracks at school, working the Savory and Sweet side of the program.  I have been pleased with On Cooking so far, though I've only really used it for reference a few times here and there, but the On Baking looks to be well structured as well. 

post #29 of 29

Not sure how it stands to "pro chef" or "on cooking" but Ive got the ACFs Culinary Fundamentals book, and besides some quirks in the recipes its a pretty comprehensive read on the kitchen. It covers equipment, techniques and quality kitchen habits or practices. I also recommend "on food and cooking" it is a incredible source of knowledge. 

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