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What's your favorite way to prepare Rib-Eye Steaks?

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
Looking for good ideas for these awesome steaks!

Thanks!
post #2 of 20
Because it's a good steak, you really don't want to crowd out the steak flavor with too much else.

My preference is some garlic, salt and pepper. Perhaps some olive oil. Grill, rest, eat.

Phil
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #3 of 20
Thread Starter 
So true.. they're my fav cut of beef and we usually just do salt/pepper but I'm feeling adventerous :)
post #4 of 20
I've tried a balsamic/herb marinade but I still didn't like it as much as just salt and pepper. By the way, it has to be a bone-in ribeye for this girl!

On Bobby Flay's "Throwdown" last night they had him going up against a fellow who's an expert in jerk seasoning, and whose signature dish is a jerk-rubbed rib eye steak. The rub make it harder to get a decent crust on the steak without burning the rub.
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post #5 of 20
Thread Starter 
We're the same - bone-in all the way !!
post #6 of 20
Bone-in, extra thick (at least 3"), S&P, Pittsburgh rare, on a bed of oyster, shiitake and crimini mushroom blend sauteed in a decent compound butter, topped with onion straws, side of Maytag Bleu Cheese crumbles and a side of potato gratin and a good Belgian triple.:bounce:
post #7 of 20
Introduce to the charcoal, allow very little further conversation. Serve with a cabernet blue cheese sauce
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #8 of 20
Thread Starter 
Don't have a charcoal grill - do you have a good recipe for a cab/blue cheese sauce?
post #9 of 20
Rare............
post #10 of 20
I agree totally....I like to watch it trying to walk away while I eat it ! :crazy:
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #11 of 20
I love mine about 2 inches thick, I rub it lightly with olive oil & rub in some of Mc Cormicks Montreal steak spice:McCormick - Product Detail - Grill Mates® Montreal Steak Seasoning

Enjoy
post #12 of 20
Yes, OldSchool, Pittsburgh! CP, my husband knows he has to pass the steak bone to me (and the pork chop bones, for that matter). One of the great pleasures of steak and chop-eating. :lips:
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post #13 of 20
CP, you might try this recipe, from Fresh Market

Blackened Steak with a Cabernet Blue Cheese Sauce

2 steaks
Awake-A-Steak seasoning (their brand, similar to Montreal Seasoning)
1 tbls olive oil
3 tbls crumbled blue cheese (at the demo they used Maytag)
1/4 cup Cabernet Sauvignon

Heat a large skillet over med-high heat for two minutes. In the meantime, rub all sides of the steaks with the olive oil and season to taste with the Awake-A-Steak seasoning. Add a few drips of oil to the hot skillet and swirl to coat. Add the steak to the skillet, and sdarf for one minute pre side. turn heat to med-low, and continue to cook the steak (turning every minute) until desired doneness.

Turn the burner back to med-high, remove the pan from the heat, and add the wine and blue cheese. Wait until wine has finished stremaing, and place pan back on the burner. Simmer until blue cheese meltw and liquid evaporates, turning a few more times to coat well. Remove the steaks from the pan and let rest 5 minutes before serving.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #14 of 20
Thread Starter 
I'd try the cab sauce but, IMO, any recipe that tells you to turn a steak every minute is on crack...:)
post #15 of 20
Cp,

How to explain the purpose of the over-active turning/flipping.......

It has always been my understanding that, among a couple other technical reason, it helps to seal the juices and adds a dimension of flavor to the steak. Typically it's done using a convection style broiler like this one in the link I provided. Southbend - Engineered to Perform, Built to Last. Similar to a Pittsburgh style steak, the steak is not marked for presentation but rather cooked for style and flavor. Years ago, when you would see a sign in front of a Steak House and it displayed "Char-Broiled" that was how it was cooked. This is not to be confused with Char-Grilled which is the method we most associate today with the cooking of steaks.

IMHPO Char-Broiling does a tremendous job at cooking meats and is the "True Steak House style". Although I'm not one to shun the cooking over the coals method for flavor but the Char-Broiling method is uniquely all it's own.

The turning frequently when using a skillet or char-grill performs the same basic effect Allbeit a minute is far too long in my book especially since my steak preference is rare!:D
post #16 of 20
Lightly smoked and then marinated in teriyaki sauce.
post #17 of 20
has the coffee rubbed ribeye been beat to death??? Not my favorite way, but it is quite tasty if you are feeling adventerous. I just use a simple rub of fine ground coffee, granulated garlic, butcher ground pepper, kosher salt. Rub the steaks with some olive oil press a tablespoon or so into the steaks and sear on a smokin hot skillit. I was pleaseantly surprised with the result.
post #18 of 20
I know this is a summer thread, and it has been said before. I'd save your seasonings for a cheaper cut of meat. Salt and pepper--good to go.:smoking:
post #19 of 20
OldSchool-

You've got that steak recipe NAILED! :cool:

I guess it's not by chance that garlic and blue cheese turn up so often. I grilled a pair of flank steaks last night that were coated with a slurry of ground-up garlic, Danish blue cheese, and olive oil. The miniCuisinart is ideal for this mix.

Next, though, I going to reproduce oldschool's recipe and presentation. :bounce:
travelling gourmand
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travelling gourmand
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post #20 of 20
The broiler is awesome! Can't go wrong with that or charcoal.
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