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Non American breakfast, no bacon, no eggs.

post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 
What do Egyptians eat for breakfast? Well, not just Egyptians. Why do ethnic restaurants not serve breakfast? This morning I feel like going out to eat, but after mulling over my choices for a bit, I'm just going to stay home.
post #2 of 29
There are numerous Chinese places, Mexican, Tex-Mex, Latino places here that serve breakfast. I believe there is at least one Turkish place, and there are several Vietnamese places that also serve breakfast. There are other as well, I am sure - just mentioning the ones I know of. Coincidentally, I had breakfast at a Chinese place just a couple of weeks ago - and not Dim Sum, BTW

Shel
post #3 of 29
Egyptians have khoubous (flat bread), olives, tomatoes, feta cheese, honey for dipping bread into and sweet tea for breakfast - not an egg in sight!
What is patriotism but the love of the food one ate as a child? ~Lin Yutang
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What is patriotism but the love of the food one ate as a child? ~Lin Yutang
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post #4 of 29
As far as I know, the traditional Egyptian breakfest is fooll midammas. It's a fava bean (the large dry ones, not the fresh green ones) stew served with lots of toppings. It's very delicious.


As for Mexican breakfast, I could kill for some chilequiles. I'd rather have pozole instead of menudo for the hangover though.

I've tried congee, but the flavor...meh. I guess it's not for the round-eyes.
post #5 of 29
foul medammes can be eaten for breakfast but generally isn't.

heat fava beans in tin by placing tin in a pan of boiling water. Crush 2/3 cloves garlic with rock salt. Add one finely chopped chilli (optional) add heated fava beans and mush. Add a good glug of quality olive oil, large handful of chopped flat leaf parsley, lemon juice and mix well. Top with chopped fresh tomatoes. Enjoy with khoubous
What is patriotism but the love of the food one ate as a child? ~Lin Yutang
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What is patriotism but the love of the food one ate as a child? ~Lin Yutang
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post #6 of 29
Thread Starter 
I love breakfast noodles btw. Maybe I'll have to go visit SF again one of these days. Get Shel to take me around. Hmm... sounds like a good excuse for a gathering.
post #7 of 29
Kuan,
My Palestinian and Lebanese friends told me that they serve up a large platter of Hummous, drizzled with olive oil and fresh lemon juice. They sit around the table with pita and have it for breakfast almost every day.

doc
post #8 of 29
Kuan, years ago I used to make a package of Sapporo Ichiban (and later the cheaper noodles), add some hot sauce and sesame oil, maybe swirl in a beaten egg and that was breakfast. It's faster than my egg-white/english muffin (read BORING) breakfast I eat these days!
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post #9 of 29
I had Lebanese neighbors. Their breakfasts were flat bread hot out of the pan with something like yogurt cheese, and other stuff that made me really hungry.
post #10 of 29
Incorrect. FOOL MEDAMES most certainly an Egyptian Dish. My Father was born in Egypt and lived there through Medical school. I ate Fool Medames almost everyday for breakfast. So do Most of the people there. Sorry to correct you, but it is most certainly a traditional breakfast dish.
post #11 of 29
Congee is excellent with some white pepper, lean stewed beef and preserved (thousand year) egg. Serve it with either a sweet or savoury dough fritter, and some plain steamed rice noodle roll (with hoisin and sesame sauce and soy).

A Hong Kong breakfast can also take place in a HK-style cafe/diner. Scrambled egg sandwiches with Chinese style pain de mie, noodles (everything from vermicelli to elbow macaroni) in soup, a thin oatmeal enriched with milk, or a more British style egg/sausage/toast combo all washed down with coffee, HK milk tea, or a mix of the two.
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"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
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post #12 of 29
I've heard about the fritter with soy milk, which could be tasty. I'd prefer a sesame or lutos nut bun though.

I could eat a congee that's topped with browned butter, brown sugar, and maybe some milk.


I think it's called cream of rice.
post #13 of 29
Congee is good as long as you don't put too much with it. Had it in Hong Kong on honeymoon - it came with an assortment of bits and pieces you could choose to put on it - ummm....this idiot put everything on it. I would stick with just a few ingredients now. But yummers!

Porridge is always good for an egg free breaky. Just plain with a bit of salt and/or butter, or jam if you've got a sweet tooth. Or semolina - gotta have jam -pref strawberry plus a bit of butter on that.

Boston baked beans with toast - always a favorite here.

Fruit compote of dried fruits with greek style yoghurt - ahhhh
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
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post #14 of 29
I stand corrected - my father is Kuwaiti - I was born there - most of the Egytians in Kuwait ate the cheese etc. for breakfast. perhaps it is a preference thing? Also a few years ago we did the Nile cruise/Pyramid trip and most of the time we had the cheese olives etc.
What is patriotism but the love of the food one ate as a child? ~Lin Yutang
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What is patriotism but the love of the food one ate as a child? ~Lin Yutang
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post #15 of 29
Okay! Then I guess it must be a preference thing like you said. Depending on area and stuff like that.
post #16 of 29
I found this on the web
Breakfast | Egyptian Cuisine and Recipes
and as you can see foul is mainly eaten for breakfast!! well I guess the Egyptians we hung out with didn't want to eat Foul for breakfast! but definitely a breakfast dish. Well you learn something new everyday
What is patriotism but the love of the food one ate as a child? ~Lin Yutang
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What is patriotism but the love of the food one ate as a child? ~Lin Yutang
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post #17 of 29
I suppose that somewhere in the world, folks eat all sorts of strange (to us) things for breakfast.

I am not one to experiment with ethnic breakfast items though, so I will stick to American breakfasts, of eggs, bacon, sausage, toast, coffee, and jam.
I will go with the occasional waffle or pancake. ;)
post #18 of 29
Thread Starter 
I had a brioche french toast crusted with almonds for breakfast today. It was yummy. Still eggs though. :)
post #19 of 29
Where I grew up in India, the Naga people (most of the students at the college were Naga) had 2 meals a day, one at about 10 AM and one at about 5 PM.

They did have a snack for breakfast at about 5 or 6 AM, strong Indian tea with milk and sugar, and dipped bread in it. When I got up that early I made sure to get some Naga breakfast at the cafeteria (it was at a college where my dad taught).
post #20 of 29
Cool - my father is arab and my mom was Indian so we had a variety of food at home. Although I went to school in LA and my favourite then was huevos rancheros!! - could eat those anytime:lips:
What is patriotism but the love of the food one ate as a child? ~Lin Yutang
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What is patriotism but the love of the food one ate as a child? ~Lin Yutang
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post #21 of 29
My favorite non traditional breakfast from way back is black eyed peas, just baked cornbread, and lots of Tabasco.
post #22 of 29
Some of my odd favorites for breakfast.

Soup--especially a spicy carrot soup on fall and winter mornings.

Fried rice. Most any kind will do.

While in Germany, a classic German breakfast was a hearty bread, some good butter, various coldcuts, some cheese and liverwurst. And often a cold hard boiled egg would be available too.

Phil
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #23 of 29
cold pizza or lasagna


turkish breakfast
cheese
cured black olives
fresh crusty bread and butter
tea or coffee

israeli breakfast is similar but may add some cold cuts to that

asian breakfast
vietnamese
pho soup with rice noodles and various veggies and meat

NY Jewish Breakfast
bagels and lox with a schmear

I am not a big egg for breakfast fan nor do I like cereal.

the french toast sounds yummy tho
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Chef Tigerwoman

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post #24 of 29
tigerwoman you beat me to the punch.....cold pizza, lasagna!!!
congee with pork, green onions, soy sauce and crullers....
grits, cheesy grits are the best
biscuits with butter and sorghum
day old corn bread and buttermilk
chevre with olives, tomatoes....whatever is around
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #25 of 29
spoon-size shredded wheat with soy milk, emphasis on soy and not water. A little marmalade or strawberry jam. And strong Indian tea.
post #26 of 29

pizza

My mothers all time favourite:
cold pizza with ketchup!:look:
& she would be horrified knowing I shared this with anyone!!
canadiangirl:lol:
post #27 of 29
hot millet roti (made from fresh milled flour) with lots of ghee and a sprinkling of chilli powder - nothing like it for breakfast!!
What is patriotism but the love of the food one ate as a child? ~Lin Yutang
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What is patriotism but the love of the food one ate as a child? ~Lin Yutang
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post #28 of 29
For years, I ate a whole box of Lorna Doones with 2 cups of 2% milk, topped off with a 12 oz Coke.

Then I started shaving it down to one row of the two rows of Lorna Doones and a 12 oz Coke.

Now, I make my own (English Muffin, Cheddar Cheese, Fried Egg and 3 Sausage links) Doc McMuffin and eat that with a 12 oz Coke.

Never ate eggs much my whole life until the last couple years, and what a difference the eggs make to the condition of your facial skin! Unexpected observation!

doc
post #29 of 29
My, my Doc! You've moved on to a more nutritious breakfast (and I'm not joking, although that Coke....).

When I didn't have time for the noodles thing I'd sometimes butter a Paielli's Brat Bun (GREAT Italian bakery in Kenosha, WI) and stuff it with lean deli turky or ham, then gulp it in the car on the way to my classroom. That's more like a Dutch or German breakfast, but oh, way too many carbs for my system as it turns out.

I grew up eating unsugared cereal (Cheerios, shredded wheat, something gaggifying called "Corn Soya", or Grape Nuts). Now I can't look a bowl of it in the eye. For a long time I ate oatmeal (minimally processed oats, raisins, walnuts cooked just 3 minutes in the microwave, topped with sugar substitute and skim milk). Didn't help my cholesterol but it tasted like my favorite oatmeal raisin cookie. :lips:
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