or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

under/overrated foods - Page 2

post #31 of 53
Very nice.

I wish it was allowed for French unpasteurized cheeses to be imported to the USA. And that fresh ingredients were a vital part of every meal :smiles:
post #32 of 53
[quote=ChefTorrie;187316]Im telling you, Pommes Dauphine, we had them as a special today at the restaurant![/quot

That sounds AMAZING! I will definitely be making that tomorrow! :roll:Now, what to serve it with.:look: Maybe a nice steak... What would you recommend Chef?
canadiangirl:smiles:
post #33 of 53
Cheftorrie, dauphin....or the american version....potatoes and cream with garlic. :) Still bops around my kitchen in the fall/winter....along with the roots and sherry dish.

One of my regular dining places serve dauphin....and kennebec frites with killer aioli and frito misto with again their great aioli......they also have escarole with currants and pinenuts....one of my favorite meals is fries and greens, extra aioli please.

Made a chai flan last week to go with an Indian meal. Flan, done right is a beautiful thing.
cooking with all your senses.....
Reply
cooking with all your senses.....
Reply
post #34 of 53
Shroomgirl.... im not sure if your had ever had REAL Dauphin then...
The traditional way is mashed, or garlic mashed as we use in out restaurant, mixed with a Pate Choux and made into little balls and fried....

and to answer your question Canadiangirl... They would indeed be very nice with a nice steak or other beef dish. We served them with an oven roasted sonoma rack of lamb, rosemary jus, and a bell pepper pipperade.
post #35 of 53
sorry mixing names....yes I've had potato beignets....dauphinous....thin sliced potatoes, eggs, cream, garlic, layered sliced in wedges or triangles.
cooking with all your senses.....
Reply
cooking with all your senses.....
Reply
post #36 of 53
Ahhh, got ya!
post #37 of 53
my version has thicker potatoes and no eggs....plenty of whole garlic cloves, salt pepper and cream....interesting how much the same ingredients change by mashing them.
cooking with all your senses.....
Reply
cooking with all your senses.....
Reply
post #38 of 53
Very true, have you ever had true dauphin?
post #39 of 53
yes, it's been a while.......
do you have a readily available recipe or source (cookbook)?

I try very hard not to fry at events. Last week's farmer dinner was Indian and I did fry samosas....been years since I'd made them, switched to frozen spring roll wrappers instead of making dough, they turned out very well. Used to swap sweet potatoes for white.....plenty of heat, cashews, white raisins, etc....
cooking with all your senses.....
Reply
cooking with all your senses.....
Reply
post #40 of 53
There's gratin dauphinois and pomme dauphine, different preparations.
post #41 of 53
I know, very different. Dauphine is what im talking about.
post #42 of 53
The first time I tried to make them they were out of season. The second time, they were on the endangered species list. go figure.
FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
Reply
FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
Reply
post #43 of 53
the fish or the french prince?......
cooking with all your senses.....
Reply
cooking with all your senses.....
Reply
post #44 of 53
amazing what changing vowels will do to a dish.
cooking with all your senses.....
Reply
cooking with all your senses.....
Reply
post #45 of 53
Better yet, just make it, decide what you want to call it later. :)
post #46 of 53
I think "offal" foods are over rated. It seems so 80's like "big game night" at restaurants that think serving rattlesnake ceviche is sexy..D:
post #47 of 53

we have been trying to get unpasteurized cheeses

in New Zealand for a while and i think we have stricter guidelines here , apparantly they taste incredible..
my mind has gone blank in regards to this question , im going to have to think about this one a bit more
when life hands you lemons, make lemon gelee, lemon meringue pie, or any other dessert your heart desires

www.theunknownchef.com
www.theunknownchef.co.nz
www.shoebridge.co.nz
Reply
when life hands you lemons, make lemon gelee, lemon meringue pie, or any other dessert your heart desires

www.theunknownchef.com
www.theunknownchef.co.nz
www.shoebridge.co.nz
Reply
post #48 of 53
Rattlesnake and wild game are not really "ofal". Ofal is typicly the organs usually thrown away durring meat break down. -But I agree , restaurants need to do a bit more some times, the mere act of serving something does not make it special. Game and ofal need to be thoughtfuly prepaired, cooked properly and above all taste good. These things take time and effort, when they are done well, it's absolutly not overrated.
nel maiale, tutto e buono!
Reply
nel maiale, tutto e buono!
Reply
post #49 of 53
Not too many years ago beef tongue sold for prices like soup bones. I used to have it all the time. Now it's priced like t-bone steaks and I hardly ever buy it. I wonder what the deal is with that.
post #50 of 53
-popularity I guess, it's the same thing with one of my favs, oxtail. 3 bucks a pound for somthing that 75% bone. really. just think,back in the day they use to throw ribs away.
nel maiale, tutto e buono!
Reply
nel maiale, tutto e buono!
Reply
post #51 of 53
My response wasn't comparing "offal" food to wild game. I am quite aware what organ meats aka offal foods are. I am comparing the popularity of restaurants that serve this to the areas where I worked in the 80's that hyped this type of cuisine like "big game night." Even well done, the number of restaurants I've seen starting this type of cuisine seems now overrated. Just like chef reality tv shows. Enough already.
post #52 of 53
Dc,
I have to agree with you on the organ meat!!!! rich, luscious meat I can never get enough of

Fillet topped with an Anaheim, rosemary and garlic infused oil surrounded by roasted brussel sprouts makes my head :roll:

Turkey I really can't stand on most occassions because, yeah, most people's turkey is really dry, but soaked in a brine mixed with a bunch of yummies then grilled and basted in a cherry/ginger sauce....I can handle that.

As for the Lobster, anything drowned in butter and doused with lemon :bounce: I could swim in the bowl~

All of this temptation as I'm sitting here at 9 pm eating a bowl of golden grahams with a bannana in it. Now that's just not fair!!!

I often wonder how one night i'm eating an incredibly flavorful dinner then the next a stacked Chicago Red hot. :look:

Glad to have found this forum to learn, laugh and make some friends!
post #53 of 53
Kuan, you've got the right idea....make it and name it later.
cooking with all your senses.....
Reply
cooking with all your senses.....
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Professional Chefs