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Rusted Knives?

post #1 of 28
Thread Starter 
Does anyone know? If your knive gets a little bit of rust on it is there anything that can take it off? Or do you just have to toss it out? I made the mistake when I first started getting into cooking of putting my knifes in the dishwasher - I've since learned my lesson, but I had a really nice knife that has rust on it. Can anything be done about that?

Thanks in advanced for your comments! I love, love, love this site! I've learned so much already by reading old posts. Love it!

Angela
post #2 of 28
If its just a few spots on the side of the blade steel wool should work
post #3 of 28
Steel wool should take it out but may also scratch the knife. Barkeepers friend should do it too, or many other polishes. Flitz is one I've used with pretty good results and it's available many places.

This polish is also well regarded: Simichrome-When Ordering with Another Item -- A. G. Russell Knives

For SMALL spots a standard pencil eraser works well. But a special version is available that works better.

Rust Eraser -- A. G. Russell Knives

Even after removal, you may have a dark stained spot there.

Phil
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #4 of 28
Thread Starter 
Thanks for recommendations. I can't wait to get rid of the rust! :-)
post #5 of 28
I use a glass-ceramic cooktop cleaner (i.e. Cerama bryte and the like).

This stuff is also good from scratches on watch lenses (the plastic ones).

can also clean stainless steel pot and pans that have stubborn food/scale residue.

BTW, stainless steel rust only when (non stainless) steel iron gets in contact with it. If your knifes have rust spots it either means you washed them with rusting metal like cheap fondue forks or something else may be rusting in your dishwasher. Check the wire basket if the plastic has peeled of the wire and it is rusting (or maybe a hidden part somewhere is rusting away).

Luc H
I eat science everyday, do you?
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I eat science everyday, do you?
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post #6 of 28
This time you're wrong Luc. Stainless will rust under many circumstances. Yes, the dielectric current between dissimilar metals is one of those, but plain stainless steel will rust from water alone. A free chloride ion eats stainless steel for lunch. Chrome isn't a magic additive that prevents rusting, merely discourages it.

I've rusted most every common cutlery stainless steel just from pocket carry. AUS6, AUS8, 440B, 440C, ATS-34, 154CM, S30V, 12c27 and more. Not to mention non-cutlery stainless such as 420, 410 and so-on that are supposed to be highly rust resistant. The 410 was in a completely nested situation and isolated from contact with other metals and it rusted on the least exposed surface.

Here's some info from Mike Stewart, a highly competent knife maker who knows more about steel than most: Aus-8 steel and (oh noes!) rust - Knifeforums.com - Intelligent Discussion for the Knife Enthusiast - Powered by FusionBB


Phil
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #7 of 28
Ok Phil,
(I accept being wrong)
I know little about stainless steel grades you speak. I liked the discussion with Mike Stewart. Thanks.

I was speaking from experience not from science in my reply.
In meat packing plants and other wet surface food production areas stainless steel surfaces rust only from contact with (oxidizable) iron. Leave a screw on the counter after applying caustic then hosing down the place and bingo, a straight rust mark line appears. The only thing that can take it out is grinding the spot (after they find the guilty party that left iron on the table and pass him in the meat grinder).

At home we can't afford any expensive cutlery or chef knifes. Anything that doesn't have a wooden handle goes in the dishwasher. I have cheap stainless steel knifes and cutlery and they never rust except during a one month period. Getting tired of buffing the every day cutlery, I thoroughly inspected the dishwasher and noticed the wire basket was rusting on the bottom of the plate rack. The plastic sheathing was torn after many plates hitting the same spot. I replaced the basket thinking that rust particles was being carried in the water during rinsing and spotting the cutlery. No rust since except on occasions we throw in those dang iron fondue forks...

Luc H.
I eat science everyday, do you?
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I eat science everyday, do you?
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post #8 of 28
Luc, I've rusted my s/s countertops with steel meat grinder dies too and wet kitchen-aid shredder attachements, and I've also manged to pit my trusted Henkels knife by not properly washing it after slicing tomatoes. When I took it out of the rack a few days later there was a series of deep pitt marks where some errant tomato seeds hadn't been carefully wiped off, they ate through the steel!
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #9 of 28
You can use a type of sandpaper called wet-or-dry and it's used in the automotive industry for body work. Start with about 300 grit and go progressively finer - all the way to 1500 or 2000 grit. This sandpaper can be gotten at Wally world or any hardware store.

I've used that stuff to remove scratches from my (mostly 1095 carbon steel) blades and the finer grits leave a very nicely buffed finish.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

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post #10 of 28
So Foopump,
You believe my explanation is plausible, right?

(wow those tomato seeds are vicious!!I have to remember that one...)

Kokopuffs, yep wet sand paper would work for deep marks for sure. (good idea). It reminds me that even car body buffing compound could also work for mild rust (similar to ceramic top cleaner). Maybe even rust spot remover also used for car bodies, it contains phosphoric acid... come to think of it maybe cola could remove mild rust.... writing out loud here.

Luc H.
I eat science everyday, do you?
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I eat science everyday, do you?
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post #11 of 28
Some people use a coke soak to remove rust from cast iron cookware.

Phil
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #12 of 28
Don't have experience with coke but I've used a product called Navel Jelly which contains phosphorice acid. It works great when it comes to a very light rust coating. Still, after using the acid consider using 1200+ grit wet-or-dry to buff up the finish.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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post #13 of 28
Look on the ingredient list of Coke, it's there, Phosphoric acid.....
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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post #14 of 28
Just use some dutch cleanser rubbed with a wine cork. That's worked on my knives made with 1095 carbon steel.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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post #15 of 28
Many custom knife makers (me included) use green scrubbing pads to place mat finishes (we call them hand-rubbed). As long as the rust isn't pitting the steel the pad should remove it easily and if you stroke it in one direction it will leave a fairly nice finish.

By the way is the rust red or black? Both are oxidation but the black stuff is actually good for protecting your blade. We call it patina and some makers actually patina the blades before they sell them.

Jim
post #16 of 28
I've heard of knifemakers soaking the carbon steel blade in vinegar overnight to establish the patina. Dunno' if this procedure works for stainless steel.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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post #17 of 28
It won't. For the most part you don't need the extra protection for stainless. It can rust but normal care prevents most of it. By the way the vinegar used is mostly a farm grade vinegar. While the store stuff will etch slowly the stuff we use is a lot more concentrated, more along the lines of ferric cloric acid used for making circuit boards.

Out side of the rusting of the steel there are other major reasons to not put a knife in the dish washer. The blade gets shoved down in with a bunch of other pieces of metal & than gets bump around during the washing which is murder on the edge. Another main reason is safety. Most people put there blades point up due to them going through the wire basket for silverware. This is a dangerous situation and is asking to get cut. The other reason is that the heat is bad on the handles. If you have anything but formed plastic handles you will destroy the adhesive (and the handle if it's wood) leaving openings for food "products to get in-between the handle & blade tang. Not only is this unsanitary but this is also another way for stainless to rust.

Jim
post #18 of 28
You probably don't want to do this. SS will in fact rust if you force it but why would you do that? Wash, dry, and put the knife away. It'll always look "sanitary" to your guests.

Buzz
Buzz - with a Short Pilot Story

One day, long, long ago there was this Pilot who, surprisingly...........
was not full of crap....
But it was a long time ago.... And it was just one day. The End
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Buzz - with a Short Pilot Story

One day, long, long ago there was this Pilot who, surprisingly...........
was not full of crap....
But it was a long time ago.... And it was just one day. The End
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post #19 of 28
Drac:

Vinegar is a kind of flavored acetic acid. Farm grade acetic acid may be known as Glacial Acetic Acid because clear crystals will sometimes form within the liquid.

Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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Best and I'm a foodie.   I know very little but the little that I know I want to know very well.

 

-T

Brot und Wein
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post #20 of 28
I use a bit of 000 steel wool to clean my knives. You don't have to rub hard, but it will take the rust off.
post #21 of 28

Just wanted to say thanks for the cera clean idea. Just got my first Global and never even thought to dry it. 5 or 10 minutes later when finished eating I saw a rust stain. Cera Clean and an ear bud, and it's gone. Perfect.

post #22 of 28

Re Acids,

 

 For old antique tool finds i soak it in a solution of water and citric acid (same stuff that makes sour worms sour). Works great and turns the rust a black flaky material and your can see the little bubbles. You can get the citric acid at bulk bin food places.

 

Not sure if this would pit a new knife. Just fun for older stuff.

 

Cheers

post #23 of 28

For both Fore and DodgyDave, this is an extremely old thread.

 

As for citric acid, it may be necessary to be very careful about the proportions of water and citric acid.  Changing Fe2O3 to Fe3O4 can be tricky - and you really don't want to mess it up.  Often, having a basic solution rather than an acidic solution will be the usual process.  Trying it first on some sacrificial bit of steel may be the most prudent course.

 

GS

post #24 of 28

Did I ever tell you guys about plantains...

post #25 of 28
Whaaaaaaat?????
post #26 of 28

Probably the same idea as sticking the blade into a potato. Google potato patina. 

Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #27 of 28

LOL!!  :thumb:

 

GS

post #28 of 28
Quote:
Originally Posted by phatch View Post
 

Probably the same idea as sticking the blade into a potato. Google potato patina. 

 

It's even better.  The peel of plantain has a bunch of tannic acid.  Look up what is in a commercial rust converter.

 

Just try it with any carbon steel and see haha


Edited by MillionsKnives - 10/30/15 at 4:07am
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