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Trout?

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 
What are some good ways to prepare fresh trout?
post #2 of 22
Butterfly, dust it with seasoned flour, griddle.
post #3 of 22
Thread Starter 
Cool.. I was considering wrapping them in foil w/ olive oil, salt/pepper, lemon slices and fresh dill - then making a Lemon-butter caper sauce to go over it? Think that'd be okay or not?

I cook salmon all the time, but haven't touched trout in years..
post #4 of 22
Cleaned and de-boned, butterflied, stuffed with thin lemon slices, fresh basil leaves and wrapped in bacon. Grill over live wood. Serve with a dallop of jalapeno tarter sauce.:lips:
post #5 of 22
Yeah you can do lemon butter too. How about this? I like "a la meuniere" a lot. Dust with flour, saute. Remove trout from pan and place on serving dish, add butter and allow to brown. This is the where a saucier's touch is all important. Add white wine, squeeze lemon, add parsley, finish seasoning.

Don't like it? Do it over. :) Burn the butter? Do it over. :D
post #6 of 22
If they're really fresh---as in out-of-the-water, into-the-pan fresh, Trout Au Bleu is always impressive.

Recently I tried a variation on the pan frying. Ground up some roasted pumpkin seeds and used that as a breading. Lightly salt & pepper the butterflied trout, soak in buttermilk, drain, dip in flour, in eggwash, in the ground pumpkin seed. Delish.

Nice this time of year, because tomatoes are at their peak, is:

Baked Trout in Tomatoes

Grease a baking dish. Add three whole trout and 6 tomatoes, sliced. Lightly brown 2 small onions, sliced, and add to tomaotes. Bake for 40 minutes in 425F oven.

Slightly more trouble, but worth the effort:

Baked Trout with Filberts

Sprinkle two whole trout with salt and white pepper. Dust with flour and dip in egg wash. Coat with 1/2 cup lightly toasted, ground filberts (hazlenuts).

In a baking dish just large enough to hold the fish heat 2 tbls clarified butter in a very hot (450F) overn for about 3 minutes. Add the fish and bake them 15-20 minutes, or until they flake easily.

In a small skillet lightly saute 1/4 cup thinkly slivered filberts in 2 tbls clarified butter until they are lightly browned. Add a tsp lemon juice and salt to taste. Pour the sauce over the trout and garnish with lemon slices.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #7 of 22
I thought I saw a pic of trout veronique in the photo gallery. I can't seem to find it.
post #8 of 22
CP,
If you are talking about freshly fished brook trout ... anything less then 1 1/2 pound or so?

Open and empty abdomen. Clean cavity with running water. S&P then place lemon/lime slices and fresh dill sprigs inside the fish. Salt the outside skin and dust with flour.

Cook on the grill, turn once or...
in a hot cast iron skillet and be generous with butter. Crisp both side when finished and finely minced garlic to hot butter for 15 seconds in the end and serve.

heaven......

(anybody ever heard about cooking a trout in clay? This is a Native cooking technique. If done correctly, the clay apparently preserves the trout inside for a long time (assuming the clay remains sealed and uncracked I suppose)).

Luc H
I eat science everyday, do you?
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I eat science everyday, do you?
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post #9 of 22
Thread Starter 
Well... I didn't get to see all these posts in time.. but... here's what I did...

It was just-caught fresh trout - a 6.3 pounder!!

I salt-peppered and EVOO'd the outside and inside of it I made about 5 scores on the topside of it thru the scales and down into the flesh... .lined the inside with lemon slices and fresh dill - wrapped it in foil on a 375-degree grill for about 25minutes...

Made a lemon-butter caper sauce to top it off with and folks loved it...

I was glad they liked it cause I was gettings nervous about this as I hadn't messed with Trout in about 7 years or so...

Thanks all for your input and ideas - I'll definitely check those out when we end up making more trout soon!
post #10 of 22
I haven't been fishing in four years. :(
post #11 of 22
CP, wish I'd known it was that big. I'd have suggested a recipe we used to use with fresh-caught steelhead, right on the beach.

What you do is filet the fish, removing all the bones. Lay the filet out on a sheet of buttered foil. Top with a layer of salt. I mean a layer; half an inch is none too thin. Top that with a layer of brown sugar, at least as thick as the salt layer. Then lay out onion rings on the sugar. Dot the whole thing with butter.

Cook directly on hot coals, turning once, for about ten minutes per inch of thickness.

Luk: I'm very familiar with the Native American technique of cooking trout (and other fish, and gamebirds) in clay. But never heard of it as a preservation method. Do you know anything more about that aspect of it?
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #12 of 22
Kuan,

Allah does not deduct from your allotted span the time you spend fishing.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #13 of 22
Isn't deboned trout an oxymoron? P

eople keep saying they can debone/filet a trout and it's great. Yet I never had a boneless one yet outside of a commercially prepared filet. Any bones in trout just make it not worth the effort.

Even fresh native trout from the stream, of which I've eaten many, just don't have much flavor or texture. True, they're better than the farmed trout. Dealing with bones just makes them completely unappealing to me.

Phil
post #14 of 22
Isn't deboned trout an oxymoron? P

eople keep saying they can debone/filet a trout and it's great. Yet I never had a boneless one yet outside of a commercially prepared filet. Any bones in trout just make it not worth the effort.

Even fresh native trout from the stream, of which I've eaten many, just don't have much flavor or texture. True, they're better than the farmed trout. Dealing with bones just makes them completely unappealing to me.

If you do get a good bone-free filet of trout there are two treatments that make trout worthwhile: Blackening and smoking.

Phil
post #15 of 22
I'm not familiar with it but it first read about this technique in a survival book. The book said that for small trout, to encase in clay usually found around streams and cook on the fire. No gutting necessary. The gut curl up in a ball and the skin stick to the harden clay and remove when the clay is broken. The book said it was a native cooking technique. Decades later I asked a native friend of mine about the technique just to see if it wasn't a myth and he told me that clay cooking was actually a way to cook and preserve the fish for a long time (how long?). When I thought about it the technique made sense: the fish is cooked in a sealed container i.e. the clay. All enzymes and micro-organisms are killed so nothing can spoil the fish. My friend did not understand my thinking.
By asking here, I was curious if somebody could confirm what I was concluding and if it was a cooking technique or a preserving technique.

Luc H
I eat science everyday, do you?
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I eat science everyday, do you?
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post #16 of 22
Thread Starter 
Yeah.. me too! LOL.. I had no idea it's size until I got there.... hehe... never seen a Trout that freakin' huge!
post #17 of 22

my favourite trout recipes

No.1...fillet and thinly slice (skin on) on the slant. dip in a mix of cumin, salt and lime juice eat at once. Mackerel works well too. (you could add it to your sushi menu.)
No.2...Make a rub with 1 tbspn Ground and a handful of fresh coriander (cilantro), Juice of a lime, 1 green chilli inc seeds. Malden salt, Tons of black pepper and 1 tsp ground cumin. Grind it all in a pestle and mortar with oil (any) to make a thick paste. Rub inside and out and stick under a medium grill till the skin bubbles on both sides. Serve with cucumber thats been lightly salted and limed and left a wee while. It's also lovely with a daal of any kind.
"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?" Jo Brand
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"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?" Jo Brand
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post #18 of 22
Wow Cp that's a big trout! Nicely done catching that one!
post #19 of 22
Don't you ever do it with US Northeast lake/creek trout!
WE ARE NOT SELLING FOOD...WE ARE IMPROVING OUR CLIENT'S LIFESTYLE - HIS LIFE IS TOO SHORT TO EAT SOMETHING HE DOESN'T LIKE
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WE ARE NOT SELLING FOOD...WE ARE IMPROVING OUR CLIENT'S LIFESTYLE - HIS LIFE IS TOO SHORT TO EAT SOMETHING HE DOESN'T LIKE
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post #20 of 22
Why not? can u not eat them raw?
"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?" Jo Brand
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"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?" Jo Brand
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post #21 of 22
Had to jump in on this one, with all this talk about bones in trout and such. I go trout fishing quite often and have come up with a number of tasty ways to prepare them. I can see that no one here is at a loss for recipes, but this buisiness about the bones is no big deal. Butterflying a trout isn't too bad, just takes good knife skills. Neither is fileting. The small rib bones are easily removed by slicing out that little sliver of flesh that contains them. Here's a good link with pics:
http://www.fivemilelake.com/cooktrout.htm
BTW- If you have some small ones (6-8"), try this:
Clean & remove the gills, leaving the heads on. Season w/ S&P, and press some extra salt on the fins. Dust w/flour or cornmeal if you like, and fry to a crisp. You can eat them whole, as the frying makes the bones brittle enough to simply chew up. I was a bit squeamish too, at first, until I found out how tasty a crunchy fried trout head can be. Not to be done with a larger than pan-size trout!
post #22 of 22
Not ours. Any freshwater or anadromous fish here is exposed to parasites and viral infections. Playing by the rules, we only allowed to serve raw/rare saltwater fish that has been flash frozen for certain period of time.

It was couple of good threads about trout etc..

http://www.cheftalk.com/forums/profe...-salmon-2.html

http://www.cheftalk.com/forums/food-...-question.html
WE ARE NOT SELLING FOOD...WE ARE IMPROVING OUR CLIENT'S LIFESTYLE - HIS LIFE IS TOO SHORT TO EAT SOMETHING HE DOESN'T LIKE
Reply
WE ARE NOT SELLING FOOD...WE ARE IMPROVING OUR CLIENT'S LIFESTYLE - HIS LIFE IS TOO SHORT TO EAT SOMETHING HE DOESN'T LIKE
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