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Commercial ranges in home kitchen? - Page 3

post #61 of 79

Prosumer- professional consumer. The term refers to any kind of professional equipment that has been redesigned (made less durable/dumbed down/idiot proofed/child proofed, made to comply with consumer protection requirements, etc) and marketed to consumers as "professional grade". While some prosumer equipment can be very good (cameras for instance) and actually bridge the gap between consumer and professional at a cost less than their professional counterpart, others are just poor imitations with a big price tag. I feel that this is where prosumer ranges fit. With so many high end kitchens being built the appliances have to have the look and glitter of the rest of the kitchen. So the market is there and the manufacturers know that if you are going to spend $75k on a kitchen, high price appliances are an easy sell. I seriously doubt that most of these kitchens get a lot of use and the manufacturers know it. So they put their money into looks, not longevity or serviceability.

post #62 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by IceMan View Post

WOW.

It amazes me how many people really need commercial products in their homes.

It's not need - it's want.

post #63 of 79
Whatever. Same thing.
post #64 of 79

Hi Cheflayne,

 

Gee, thanks for the information. It's very informative.

 

Some of the more interesting things I was reading here are the myriad descriptions about extreme heat produced by these stoves, the combustion gases, and all of that . . . almost as if they were talking about the kind of food production seen in a 200 seat restaurant and not that in a home. But, I kept thinking that, in a home, no such production would be possible and so those considerations are being somewhat misapplied to a residential environment. The idea behind your point about "475 is 475 in my book" rings quite true: residential use of a commercial appliance will yield residential tolerances and output to some degree.

 

In other words, if you make a meal for four people on a 6 burner Garland, your commercial unit should produce relatively equivalent heat and combustion gases, etc., found in producing that same meal on a residential unit, give or take. While there certainly are some additional safety considerations one must factor into having a commercial unit in the home, I think many folks are applying a busy Friday night at the nearest 200 seat four-star scenario to a hum-drum Monday night at home fish fry environment. That is, steak for four is steak for four and not for 180 in my view.  

 

In any case, thanks again for all the information. 

 

Sarah      

post #65 of 79

Hi Jimyra,

 

So, tell me, have you installed your unit as yet? It sounds as though you have. 

 

How much were the installation costs? Did you involve the code department in your area?

 

Ok, thanks for the information.

 

Sarah 

post #66 of 79
Quote:
 Some of the more interesting things I was reading here are the myriad descriptions about extreme heat produced by these stoves, the combustion gases, and all of that . . . almost as if they were talking about the kind of food production seen in a 200 seat restaurant and not that in a home. But, I kept thinking that, in a home, no such production would be possible and so those considerations are being somewhat misapplied to a residential environment. The idea behind your point about "475 is 475 in my book" rings quite true: residential use of a commercial appliance will yield residential tolerances and output to some degree.

 

I don't quite follow your logic completely here. Yes, commercial ranges do get hot. The sides of the cabinet and oven door don't have the insulation that a residential range does but that insulation is there to protect children and adults who will file lawsuits if they get burned. Commercial ranges have clearance requirements meaning you can't put then right up against your wooden cabinets or combustible wall either.

 

Commercial burners can be twice as large (BTU wise) as prosumer.  But make no mistake, prosumer ranges and even regular residential ranges that are gas fueled still require a vented hood and adequate makeup air otherwise you run the risk of carbon monoxide poisoning. A commercial range requires a sizable hood but a prosumer range definitely requires a decent size hood also, certainly more so than the useless excuses (like those part of above the range microwaves) found in many residential kitchens.

 

I think the whole point here (if you are asking) is that if you are a dedicated chef or cook and you want a range that is reliable and serviceable at a decent cost the only way to get that is to go commercial.

post #67 of 79
Sorry ... "dedicated chefs or cooks", doing regular "home" cooking, only need quality equipment that operates properly. My < $400 Kenmore of 20+ years worked absolutely fine in my regular home kitchen for all the family meals I ever made there. It also worked absolutely fine for all the professional work I did at home. Ordinary people, even including professionals working at home, don't need commercial. Big heads and egos want commercial. If you've got the money ... make yourself happy. Please don't try to justify it with any other reasons, please.


Right now in my new home I've got a GE True Temp "Spectra XL44" that I got for free working a remodel job. I wanted to keep the Kenmore but it was much more work to get it here. It works just fine.

I'll repeat myself to see if you're reading this entire post ... "Buy whatever you like. It's OK."



"Skills trump everything else."
"We work in kitchens ... It ain'te rocket surgery."
post #68 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by IceMan View Post

Ordinary people, even including professionals working at home, don't need commercial. Big heads and egos want commercial. If you've got the money ... make yourself happy. Please don't try to justify it with any other reasons, please.
 

 

That is your take on the subject.

 

My take, not justification because neither I nor my ego need to, is that with commercial I don't have to worry about damaging the finish, I get big sturdy spiders, I get ease of cleaning, lastly it is way simple and I can fix anything that needs fixing although in 25 years that number is zero so far. As to cost, that was a whopping $25 plus some elbow grease, time, naval jelly, and stove paint.

 

That is my story and I'm sticking to it. Of course your take on my take is up to you. All I know is that my sleep tonight will be undisturbed. ;~)

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #69 of 79
I wasn't talking to you. So nahh!
post #70 of 79

Oh man!!! There goes my sleep!

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #71 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by sarahg View Post
 

Hi Jimyra,

 

So, tell me, have you installed your unit as yet? It sounds as though you have. 

 

How much were the installation costs? Did you involve the code department in your area?I

 

Ok, thanks for the information.

 

Sarah 

Yes it is installed.  My cost including the equipment was $15,000 +-.  I did much of the work myself and some of the materials including the hood were from a demolition job.  There is no code department in my area.  At one time in my life i worked as an engineer and a licensed contractor.  My installation meets national recommended codes.  If  I were estimating this job for a client I would estimate $30,000 plus for new construction more for rebuild.

post #72 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by IceMan View Post

Sorry ... "dedicated chefs or cooks", doing regular "home" cooking, only need quality equipment that operates properly. My < $400 Kenmore of 20+ years worked absolutely fine in my regular home kitchen for all the family meals I ever made there. It also worked absolutely fine for all the professional work I did at home. Ordinary people, even including professionals working at home, don't need commercial. Big heads and egos want commercial. If you've got the money ... make yourself happy. Please don't try to justify it with any other reasons, please.


Right now in my new home I've got a GE True Temp "Spectra XL44" that I got for free working a remodel job. I wanted to keep the Kenmore but it was much more work to get it here. It works just fine.

I'll repeat myself to see if you're reading this entire post ... "Buy whatever you like. It's OK."



"Skills trump everything else."
"We work in kitchens ... It ain'te rocket surgery."

If you want something and can afford it you don't have to justify it.  Big heads and egos would apply to many on this site.  Skills are nothing if you have nothing to use them with.  

post #73 of 79
$30,000 for a stove installation?!? Nice work if you can get it. It doesn't make you a better cook though.


Buy what you want ... It's OK.
post #74 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by IceMan View Post

$30,000 for a stove installation?!? Nice work if you can get it. It doesn't make you a better cook though

 

I've already pointed out that it's quite usual to see kitchens costing upwards of $75K that are just for looks and paid for by people who do takeout every night.

post #75 of 79
LOL.

I WAS AGREEING WITH YOU. All I've been saying (in this thread and most "knife" threads I've commented in), is that $$$ doesn't do anything for skills. You're not any better at cooking, your food doesn't taste any better, if done with more expensive tools, as long as the tools you use are proper. Now ChefLayne is an outlier. He does not fit the general standard spec of people cooking at home. Everyone else not in the 1.4% of outliers like him, don't have any real need for commercial equipment in their kitchens. If you've just gotta have it because it's cool and makes you feel good ... OK ... I get it. Believe it or not, I have some things like that myself. YES, that's right, ME. I have some things that are cool and make me feel good. It's OK.
post #76 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by IceMan View Post

Now ChefLayne is an outlier. He does not fit the general standard spec of people cooking at home.

 

LOL!!! I don't know if I should be flattered or insulted. :crazy: 

Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #77 of 79



post #78 of 79
Quote:
Originally Posted by IceMan View Post

$30,000 for a stove installation?!? Nice work if you can get it. It doesn't make you a better cook though.


Buy what you want ... It's OK.


range 7000.  hood 2500, fire suppression 2500, fans 3000, Elec 1500,  ducting 5000, Gas 1500, plans and permits 3000 = 26000 plan on a budget of 30000.  I agree that $$$ stuff does not make a better cook of a person.  It can make it easier and faster.

 

HalB,  What about the ones that buy pre-perpared meals and heat them up in a $75,000 kitchen?

post #79 of 79

Those would be the ones who put it in their $7K oven, wait for the guests to arrive, make sure they all watch as he takes it out, then wait for them to say what a great chef he is.

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