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Roast Beef In Crockpot?

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 
Has anyone else tried cooking Beef should or roast in a crockpot?
post #2 of 23
Yes. Pick a tough cut. And size it carefully to your crock pot. Don't cook a roast that doesn't fit comfortably in the pot with some room to spare. Don't add much liquid, lots will render out and stay in the pot. If your roast is too large or you add too much liquid, it will overflow as it cooks.

Phil
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #3 of 23

Roast

I have cooked roast in there many times.. I agree about not adding much liquid. Sometimes I brown the roast before putting it in, sometimes I dont.. It has always turned out tender as long as I cook it really slow and low.

Cat
 

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Cat
 

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post #4 of 23
Thread Starter 
Thankk you, as for flavoring do you usually put vegetables in with it?
post #5 of 23
Veggies add so much flavor & ( I think they are a must!) Potatoes, carrots, onion &garlic. Whatever you want to put in but make sure there is enough room, & not too much liquid . MOST IMPORTANT :veggies go on the bottom(under the roast)About 30 min. before you take it out you can add some mushrooms &/or green beans or peas!
ENJOY!:lips:

canadiangirl:smiles::cool:
post #6 of 23
Thread Starter 
Would 30 minutes be long enough for the roast in the crock pot? The other recipes that I have seen are for hours. One recipe that I saw was:
Main Courses
post #7 of 23
In some places people cook barbecue meat wrapped in foil. I use a covered oven dish instead (Corning), and start hot and then cook at 200-250 degrees for a pretty long time, about 3 hours for small roasts. The drippings stay with the meat and slowly evaporate, and add a lot of flavor. Pretty similar, I would say (?)
post #8 of 23
No. 30 min. before your roast is done , add those ingredients (mushrooms,beans or peas ) because they don't need to cook that long or they will be mushy. The first veggies (potatoes ,carrots, onion, & garlic) must cook as long as the roast otherwise they will be raw. I know it sounds confusing but it works.
canadiangirl
post #9 of 23
Not to sound too stuffy here but...

"Roast" and "crock pot" are not compatable terms. Roasting, by its definition, involves cooking with direct heat in a dry medium or environment. Classicly with high heat, though "slow roasting" is popular enough a term that I won't argue the point.

When you use a slow cooker you are employing a diffused heat. And to a large extent steaming your meat. You are moving more towards a poelle than a roast. Especially in preparations like Canadiangirl mentions above, where a garnish is added towards the end.

--Al
post #10 of 23
Yeah we weren't talking about roasting beef, but we all knew that. Probably referring to a cut of meat that's usually roasted.
post #11 of 23
AndyG,

Fair enough but the selection of tough cuts did specificly come up, which you wouldn't roast. I guess what I was driving at was that when you're using a crock pot for beef (or pork, or lamb for that matter) you are better off not thinking in terms of a roasting cut but something that is better suited to a moist, slower cooking.

Just for the record, I also wasn't "poo-pooing" slow cookers ( I have two). Cooking a roasting grade cut of beef is not the same as capital "R" roasting it, as you know. I just wanted to draw attention to that. Food terminology does tend to get tossed around pretty carelessly these days which can lead to confusion. Like I said, I don't want to be stuffy about it.

--Al
post #12 of 23
Allan,
I think the terminology getting tossed arround (and thus confusing or contradictory) is what the cut of meat is that many folks purchase...

A roast cut rather than a steak cut...

"I put a roast in the crock pot."

As far as technique, I let time work to my advantage by putting the potatos, carrots, and onions in along with the seasoning and a big ol' chunk-o-meat (roast cut of some sort) in the cooker in the morning, set on low, and it's ready to go that evening (10 hours later).

Savory and tender, and limited energy usage...

Good for making even the toughest cut of meat relatively edible.

I wonder what it would do to an old shoe...

Never have tried to use it to cook anything in less than 8 hours, other than chili conqueso.
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post #13 of 23

Cooking time

The roast will need to cook for hours. I cook mine for 8 to 10 hours ( depending on the size and the dish)
As far as adding ingredients, again it depends on what the final outcome will be. Sometimes I add veggies for the "Sunday Roast" other times I add only spices/seasoning and thinly slice as serve as Italian beef sandiwches.

Cat
 

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Cat
 

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post #14 of 23
I cook a lot of chuck roasts in my crock pot during the winter. The cut is less expensive and because it's a tougher cut of meat works well with this cooking method. I usually brown it in some flour and either make a gravy from the drippings and pour over the meat, or add enough beef broth or water to make a thin gravy in the crock. Sometimes I add onions, peppers, and mushrooms along with herbs and spices of choice that day. We like it cooked to the point of being shredded easily with a fork and then spooned over mashed potatoes. Now, if I was actually "roasting" it in the oven, I wouldn't want it cooked to that point of doneness.
post #15 of 23
I do beef briskets this way for my in-laws, for whom tender meat is a must. Due to digestive difficulties I can't use most herbs and spices (including garlic, black pepper and pungent herbs like rosemary), so I use a ton of thickly sliced onions and mushrooms on the bottom of the crockpot, put the (unsalted!) meat on top, then another layer of the veggies. Sometimes I sneak in some parsley and celery, too. I add about a cup of beef broth and let 'er rip for 6 hours. Then I remove the meat, slice it thinly, and portion it out for freezing. I pick out the onion and put some mushrooms in each portion. Then I strain the broth, add it to the portions, and freeze. They LOVE it.

If I were making it for others, I'd add thyme, rosemary, carrots and canned tomatoes, plus a good shot of red wine to the liquid. I'd also brown the meat before putting it in the cooker.
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post #16 of 23
Yum, sounds good.
post #17 of 23
I agree with Allan McPherson that we are really talking about two different methods of cooking...Roasting v. Braising. The crock pot will not roast anything. But it does a very great job of braising. Even if you don't add any extra liquid. The liquid from the meat juices and fat, as well as the condensation while cooking makes the liquid that is used to braise the meat.

I do this same thing in a roasting pan covered with aluminum foil in my oven at 200 degrees or I use a turkey roaster pan with a lid. But I still don't call it "roasting", cuz it's braising.
post #18 of 23

Read the posts...

Nobody said they were roasting a roast in a crock pot/slow cooker...
I might be suffering from CDO.
It is just like OCD, except the letters are in alphabetical order.
Just as they should be...
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I might be suffering from CDO.
It is just like OCD, except the letters are in alphabetical order.
Just as they should be...
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post #19 of 23
I love the taste of celery leaves. I think it's too bad that so often the celery leaves are thrown away.
post #20 of 23
Grow some lovage. You'll be happy.
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #21 of 23
We get frost here even in summer sometimes, can't grow much. I miss where I moved from sometimes, but for the most part love it here
post #22 of 23
Wow DMT! Then maybe I misunderstood the title of this thread... *blush* "Roast Beef in Crockpot". My apologies. *blush*
post #23 of 23
Well, we got that "roast" reference taken care of :D It is important to know the difference between braising and roasting.

In India, where I grew up, there was no such thing as a tender cut of beef, or even a tender chicken. Tandoori chicken (YUM) is marinated, partly to make it more tender.
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