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Kosher Parve Bakery

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
Well, I'm in Texas for a few weeks (just relocated) and found myself a position in a Kosher Parve bakery and I have never worked Kosher Parve.
Does anyone have any tips for me?
I am taking much of what I know and converting the formulas to non-dairy and holiday spacific.
The owners have a rich history of formulas and techniques so I will learn a lot from them but, anything a nice Unitarian girl should know? :chef:
bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
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bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
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post #2 of 11
Congratulations on your relocation! Lucky patrons, I dare say.

I'd love to hear about the place. In what city are you now? (Your profile still says "NY"....)
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post #3 of 11
Hey, hey!!
There are plenty of local publications on Kashrut sp?
Is there a Rabbi affiliated with the bakery? If so, you will have plenty of guidance.
I need a good rugala formula.
There's a good little bakery joint in Tex, you need to look them up:D
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post #4 of 11
I second Panini's advice. If the bakery is kosher, there's a rabbi supervising it. Also, there are a gazillion kosher cooking websites, but I would check with the rabbi as to the heksher they subscribe to. (That is the symbol of kosher certification. It varies depending on the Orthodox group certifying the kitchen.)

Jeff, if you need a good rugala recipe, I have a very good one. :D It's dairy, though.

4 cups AP flour
2 cups sour cream
1 pound margarine (salted is okay)

Cut the fat into the butter, then blend in the sour cream. Rest at least 4 hours, but the dough freezes very well if tightly wrapped. When ready to bake, divide the dough into 8 equal pieces.

Roll one piece of the dough out into a rectangle about 5" X 14", 1/4" thick. (Traditional recipes have you rolling out 6-8" circles and cutting wedges, then rolling into horns. Too fussy for me.)

Spread a skim coat of apricot (or raspberry, etc.) jam over the dough, leaving 1/4" of the top edge un"jammed". Sprinkle with a mixture of white and brown sugar, chopped nuts, raisins and cinnamon. Roll up across the wide side. Cut into 1-1/2" lengths. Wash with egg wash, then dip in turbinado sugar. Place on parchment 1" apart. Bake at 350 30-35 minutes.

Alternate filling: chopped bittersweet chocolate with white sugar. Sprinkle over jam and roll. You can also use this dough for savory fillings (sundried tomato/olive tapenade; spinach-cheese; etc.)

Baked rugalah freeze well. I've even re-frozen them, but I admit they aren't as pretty- but they do taste good! This recipe is based on one in Raymond Sokolov's Jewish-American Cookbook, but I've made lots of changes in method and some ingredients.
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post #5 of 11
Parave means they are Kosher for passover, nothing with corn products and nothing that rises, plus someother rules.
post #6 of 11
Thread Starter 

no dairy

Nope, pareve or parve means no dairy, it is the u in a circle symbol.
Kosher for Passover is Kosher K in a circle and the P symbol.


Thank you Mezz.
I can get tofu sour cream and cream cheese for rugalah and tira mi su!

Panini, do you know any good kosher parve cheese makers in Dallas?

The place is called Esther's Bakery in Richardson, next to their Steak House, good food and lots of it!

Hoping to open next Tues or Wed.
bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
Reply
bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
Reply
post #7 of 11
Ahh, ok, Im not Jewish but I do like to nash.
post #8 of 11
Thread Starter 

neither am I!

I have to remember to drink my coffee before entering the building!
(milk and equal)

I have had a crash course in the past 3 days on what to look for, what is allowed and how to work with the ingredients.

Ask questions first :bounce:
bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
Reply
bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
Reply
post #9 of 11
Hi M,

I'm glad you found something so quickly!

I spent a few yrs. working in Kosher parve and kosher dairy in NYC. I also grew up kosher. What is your biggest concern?

Soymilk is a good sub for milk in many cases. Rich's coffee creamer is okay, but it's sweetened usually, and so you'll have to adjust the sugar in your formula. You may also choose to intensify the natural flavors of your desserts to hide the FAKE taste of that stuff. I became good at that, and the desserts kicked butt.

Remember that kosher people are used to having dairy substituted with this stuff, so it's not as weird tasting to them as it is to non-kosher folks. One thing that never occurred to me at the time (because it was before the trans-fat rage), is what kind of fats are present in those non-dairy creamers. They're not natural, so bear that in mind, if that's something you care about.

The main suggestion I have is that you use really good dark chocolate (lots of them are kosher certified), and lots of fresh fruits and nuts. This will make up for the lack of dairy. Also, remember that gelatin is a no-no, but Kojel is fine.
post #10 of 11
m brown,
I'm thinking Paula is Kosher. Mozzarella Company
A lot of the big vendors, Ben E Kieth, Sysco, I think carry D'Primo out of Long Island.
Not really sure.
pan
Nice, score a job and start before you even visit:D
Mezz, thanks for the rugala recipe
FOR YEARS I LIVED TO WORK! NOW I WORK TO LIVE!
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post #11 of 11
Thread Starter 
Momo, how do the rice/soy milks hold up to baking as far as custards/brulees and bread puddings?
Rich's Whipped Topping is coming out w/o sugar!!! that is a good thing for the times I need to use it as a componant.
So far, Rich's bakes well in my flourless chocolate and no funky aftertaste!


I must admit, this is really fun and the owners are really hardworking, full of good humor and willing to share information with me.


Pan, I will be by soon!
Thx for the cheese
bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
Reply
bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
Reply
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