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Is Stock Wasteful?

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
Me and a household member have this on going debate weather or not stock is wasteful.

I love making soup and have thus done a lot of research into stock making and i find that in the culinary world it is agreed that a lot of bones and meat is used for a relatively small amount of water and most recipes simply tell you to discard the left over meat and veggies, for example one of my favorite stocks consists of 2lb of chicken wings for 6 cups of water, the result is a flavourful gelatinous stock base.
Basically id like to know how much nutrients is absorbed into the water? and if tossing the over cooked leftovers is really a big waste or not (aside from the fiber ##).
I, relatively speaking, do not think this is a wasteful use of meat and vegges if the outcome is a very nutritious soup especially with something like 2lbs of chicken wings,something that is likely to be wasted at the supermarket anyway, however with out knowing exactly how much nutrients is lost i cant say for sure.
If any one has any thoughts or incite about this subject id really like some feedback, and be very thankfull, Ive tried to look on the Internet for some sort of study but failed. Thanks.
post #2 of 13
Aside from the fact that it adds a lot of flavor to soups and sauces, the original purpose of stocks was to use leftover carcasses/bones of chicken, veal, beef etc. that would otherwise be thrown away. Nowadays, so many establishments are buying pre-fabricated meat, that it is truly only for flavor, rather than to reduce waste.
post #3 of 13
Stock wasteful????

Taste the difference between fresh stock (or frozen homemade) and any shortcut, if your tastebuds exist, there's no comparison.

As long as it's not taking up half your fridge space, I say you're on the right track!
post #4 of 13
The other day at home I needed some chicken stock. At the grocery store I passed on chicken wings at a crazily high price (due to the popularity of buffalo wings) and bought drumsticks. I simmered the stock until the drumsticks were done (didn't time, but maybe 15 minutes), removed the drumsticks and pulled off the meat. Tossed the bones back in stock and finished simmering stock. The results were a beautiful gelatinous stock plus cooked chicken for use in chicken salad, burritos, soup, or whatever.
Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #5 of 13

Stock needs flavour, not supermarkets

I find the only place i can find a decent, aged hen is my local Chinese market. The best thing in the world for a fab chicken stock. Just add carrot, onion Bay leaves and peppercorns. I promise you you'll know the difference.
If youre using leftover cooked carcasses save them in the freezer til you have 6 and boil the bejeezuz out of them then reduce reduce.
Beef stock :-Make sure your bones are well roasted before you use them and while they're roasting griddle some onions, skin on halved and well coloured.
Any veg used to make stock in our place is considered cooks perks and gobbled up at a rate of knots
"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?" Jo Brand
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"If we're not supposed to eat animals, why are they made of meat?" Jo Brand
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post #6 of 13
Wasteful? Depends, really, on how you are making it.

For instance, I'll typically buy three hens at once---waiting for them to go on sale---break them down, and use the backs, necks, sometimes the wings, etc. for stock. Basically, parts that otherwise would not be used.

But if you start with, say, a whole hen, cook the bejesus out of it, and then discard the meat, to me that would be wasteful. Nothing wrong with the resulting stock. But not particularly cost-effective when the same can be made from scraps.

Or combine that with cheflayne's approach. Use both the scraps and whole cuts, but pull the actual meat when it's just cooked.

That's an old culinary secret we call having your cake and eating it too. :lips:
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #7 of 13
That's what I do too. Usually I buy one whole bird and several pounds of backs (which are cheap). I cook the whole chicken in cheesecloth to make it easier to pull out early while the backs and veg continue awhile longer. Boiled chicken can be surprisingly tasty.
Emily

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Emily

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"If you are not killing plants, you are not really stretching yourself as a gardener." -- J. C. Raulston, American Horticulturist
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post #8 of 13
I do something similar to KYH. I buy 4 chickens get 8 skinless breast, 8 drumsticks, 8 thighs, 8 small filet, 16 half wings. I freeze everything IQF style. I developed recipes for each one of those parts with that amount just enough for the whole family with some leftovers for lunch.
If each have chicken comes with heart and liver, I combine to make a paté.

Everything else (the carcass and cuttings) I use to make stock which I freeze as icecubes and use to enhance rice cooking water, soups, sauces, marinades, season pasta or make plain tortellini in brodo. We I drain the stock, I pick through the spent bones for nice pieces of chicken meat which I add to some broth to make a chicken noodle soup.

That way I do not feel I am wasteful.

Buying chicken parts to make broth is just spending money (for some that's not wasteful but part of cooking, for others it is). I buy parts only in case of emergency.

To date when I run out of broth, there is always a chicken sale around.

(I think I posted my broth recipe in here somewhere)

Luc H.
I eat science everyday, do you?
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I eat science everyday, do you?
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post #9 of 13
When cooking at home:
I make stock out of whole chx, it is the only way I buy the meat.

I never consider the meat useless that is leftover, I usually shred it and add it to the soup, or mix it with some spices and throw it in a taco or burrito.

Another thing I do is make a broth with the whole chx, As in season, s & P it. Now this isn't really stock, but I get good juice for my soup and seasond meat which I make a chx salad out of.
"Just can't wait to get on the road again."
Willie Nelson
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"Just can't wait to get on the road again."
Willie Nelson
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post #10 of 13
If I am making stock with chicken, I will usually eat the chicken wings. I love them boiled. But couldn't you also use the chicken meat in the soup itself - say for chicken noodle soup?
Jenyfari from Only Cookware and Only Cookware Blog - A Consumer Guide to Cookware
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Jenyfari from Only Cookware and Only Cookware Blog - A Consumer Guide to Cookware
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post #11 of 13
I thought stock was a solution.
Outside of a dog, a book is a man's best friend. Inside of a dog it's too dark to read. - GM
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Outside of a dog, a book is a man's best friend. Inside of a dog it's too dark to read. - GM
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post #12 of 13
Fresh stock is a waste only if you don't use it.

It is a solution of flavors in water. It is also a solution to boring soups!~
post #13 of 13
Chateau potatoes

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