ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › Preserve Eggs for a Longer Period
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Preserve Eggs for a Longer Period

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
1.Wash the eggs and put them slowly in a container full of lime water or mustard oil. The eggs will not only be preserved for long - they will not get spoiled either.
2.For storing eggs for longer time say for about 30-40 days, you should apply any cooking oil with the help of brush on the egg shell. They will stay for long time.
post #2 of 10
Are the eggs likely to absorb the flavours of the lime or mustard oil?
Jenyfari from Only Cookware and Only Cookware Blog - A Consumer Guide to Cookware
Reply
Jenyfari from Only Cookware and Only Cookware Blog - A Consumer Guide to Cookware
Reply
post #3 of 10
For what it's worth......

Huhhhhh?:confused:

Generally I take the "use by" date as a guide line. Granted I have been taught what to look for in an egg to show it's "freshness" but it's still a scarry thought keeping something too much longer that that date.

First off the yolk should ride high in the center of the albumen, be a bright yellow with no cloudiness. Secondly the albumen should also have some height, be about twice the circumference as the yolk and also have very little "water" pooling around it.

Eggs absorb things through their shell. It porous. So anything you coat the egg with will eventually leach into the egg. Taste or color. Look at an Easter egg for an example. The color does bleed through.

IMHPO I don't believe it to be a good idea to do this. It kind reminds me the story we were told that you could keep raw chicken in the refrigerator for up to 4 weeks if soaked and completely submerged in veg oil. ;)
post #4 of 10
Uh, not to sound dense here, but is there really a need to store eggs for 30 days? If you use eggs that infrequently chucking a couple out here and there shouldn't be that much of heartbreaker. In my area a dozen eggs costs about $2.50. From what I've seen the cost of the mustard oil alone would be more expensive than throughing the whole twelve in the garbage. Am I missing something?

--Al
post #5 of 10
I think this guy is just trying to plug his best blenders site:
Blenders: The Gas Powered Blender
post #6 of 10
Preserving eggs has been a past time for many people throughout the ages. Alot of methods were invented looong before supermarkets or battery-hens and cages were around. Cheese was invented as a method to store surplus milk, and hen owners were concerned about storing eggs and keeping them from going bad until they could be used up.

In Europe (before refrigeration came about) there was a common practice of using something called "waterglass", which for the life of me don't know what it is, maybe some kind of lime, for storing eggs. Many old recipies gave side notes about washing the waterglass off, or not using eggs that had been stored in waterglass for certain recipies.
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
Reply
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
Reply
post #7 of 10
Your answer intrigued me, so I searched on "ask.com" and found this answer at recipecottage.com:

Sodium Silicate in the Preservation of Raw Eggs

Using waterglass or sodium silicate. Use eggs that are not fertile
and they should not be more than 10-12 hrs old.

For 10 dozen eggs place 9 qts. of boiling water in a five gallon
crock. Add one quart of waterglass and mix well. Add eggs. The
liquid should cover the eggs by at least 2-3 inches. Cover and
store in a cool place. Not recommended for longer than 6 months
storage.
post #8 of 10
This thread has me thinking.

I know we have the "use by date" on a carton, but how long is realistic for an egg before they go bad?

When I was a child in Alaska our produce and dairy was shipped in by slow boat, then trucked. Eggs yolks didn't stand high when you broke them, they were flat and almost impossiable to separate from the white. Scrambled eggs were neon-mustard yellow. They all had a strong taste, and nowdays some of us who grew up here actually have egg stories. One of the first trips to the states, and thinking the eggs were bad as they had no flavor; or asking the waiter how they boiled the flavor out of the eggs, etc.

We ate them and used them. Makes we wonder where the danger point is in using an egg; it must be quite differant than the fresh dates.
post #9 of 10
sodium silicate
n.
Any of various water-soluble silicate glass compounds used as a preservative for eggs, in plaster and cement, and in various purification and refining processes. Also called soluble glass, water glass.
post #10 of 10
waterglass used to be used as glue in offices, and in rome they would always have a jar next to the teller in every postoffice, with a paintbrush in it, for sticking things on envelopes, packages, etc.

As for the use-by date, i never know what i'm going to eat any week, and when the kids were still here, but teenagers, never knew how many people would be eating at home, a horde of hungry adolescents or just us parents, so there were often either no eggs left in the fridge or loads of eggs over the best-by date.
I use the freshest for eating as eggs (fried egg, scrambled, omelette, etc) but in dishes where the egg is not the main flavor and where the egg will be thoroughly cooked in any case, (chocolate cake, other baking and some cooking like meatloaf), i just break the egg into a dish and if it doesn;t smell or look cloudy (that was probably when the container got to the back of the fridge and rested against the cooling plate and they half froze!), i consider it good. I never had an off taste or a person getting sick from my cakes and stuff.
It's not even that they;re that expensive, but if i have only a bunch of eggs that have gone over the expiration date, and i'm in the middle of making a cake i don;t want to go out to the store.
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › Preserve Eggs for a Longer Period