or Connect
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › General Discussions › The Late Night Cafe (off-topic) › This thread should proveto be a lot of FUN!
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

This thread should proveto be a lot of FUN!

post #1 of 57
Thread Starter 
I am going to start this off and hope people will follow - having grown up in the US, I now live in UK so being on here I am finding it quite amusing! ok here goes

Mail - Post
Cookie - Biscuit
Fries- chips
Crossing guard - lollipop lady!!!
Elevator - lift
Cilantro - Coriander
Zucchini - Courgette
Sidewalk - pavement
Crosswalk - zebra crossing?
What is patriotism but the love of the food one ate as a child? ~Lin Yutang
Reply
What is patriotism but the love of the food one ate as a child? ~Lin Yutang
Reply
post #2 of 57

Bugger off you bloody sod!

Cigarette - Fag
Guy - Bloke
Pharmacy - Chemist
**** - Bloody
**** - Sod
**** - Shag
Arugula - Rockett

How did I learn how to swear in Brittish?
Keep those fires burnin'
 
Reply
Keep those fires burnin'
 
Reply
post #3 of 57
Hire-Rent
Jumper-Sweater
Singlet-Tshirt

etc....
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
Reply
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
Reply
post #4 of 57
Carry out = Take Away (I'd have some minus food, please...)
Exit = Way Out (How far? Way far...)
I might be suffering from CDO.
It is just like OCD, except the letters are in alphabetical order.
Just as they should be...
Reply
I might be suffering from CDO.
It is just like OCD, except the letters are in alphabetical order.
Just as they should be...
Reply
post #5 of 57

re

The English-to-American Dictionarywow I bet thats fun. beatiful scenery I love the accent on the womens.
sorry edited i like birds = women
on the blower = telephone
"Bob's your uncle" = "there you have it."
Afters = dessert

digestive= biscuit that you dip into tea
nosh = food
rocket to a British chef will be the green herb arugula to an American one.
tipple n. A "tipple" is a demure, civillised drink, usually of sherry, Martini or some other light spirit measure. Just the one. You grandmother might acquiesce to a tipple before dinner.
post #6 of 57
"Carry out = Take Away (I'd have some minus food, please...)"

Huh, in Canada its usually Take Out. Just us, always looking for middle ground!

--Al
post #7 of 57
Thread Starter 
Hey Raz - you are doing cockney rhyming slang - I am just talking about cultural americanisms to English - I do not understand the cockney!! plates of meat - apparently means Feet!!
What is patriotism but the love of the food one ate as a child? ~Lin Yutang
Reply
What is patriotism but the love of the food one ate as a child? ~Lin Yutang
Reply
post #8 of 57
Thread Starter 
my favorite in UK - can I use your bathroom - 'why are you going to take a bath?'
What is patriotism but the love of the food one ate as a child? ~Lin Yutang
Reply
What is patriotism but the love of the food one ate as a child? ~Lin Yutang
Reply
post #9 of 57
Ride - lay (Irish vs American)
fanny - fanny (USA vs England)
roast - braise (uh oh what languages)
Fahrt means "journey" in German
French people like pain, but theirs is made of grain, baked
post #10 of 57
Thread Starter 
Is that for real - so if you want a ride they ask if you want a lay?
What is patriotism but the love of the food one ate as a child? ~Lin Yutang
Reply
What is patriotism but the love of the food one ate as a child? ~Lin Yutang
Reply
post #11 of 57
We say aubergine - others say eggplant.
We say 'use the grill' - others say broil.
We say scones - others say biscuits (even if they aren't QUITE the same)
In Scotland we say Ah pricots, the English (and others) say Ay pricots.
post #12 of 57
We say
"wife beaters" or tank undershirts
Brits call them "vests"

www.foodandphoto.com

Liquored up and laquered down,
She's got the biggest hair in town!

Reply

www.foodandphoto.com

Liquored up and laquered down,
She's got the biggest hair in town!

Reply
post #13 of 57
:lol: Just try asking an Irish person if they want a ride.:crazy:
post #14 of 57
American truck = lorry
American baby buggy (or stoller) = pram
American "bath"room = loo or WC
American subway = tube or underground
I have to laugh when I hear (or use) the term "peckish" (meaning a bit hungry). Won't go there for a U.S. equivalent! :eek:
Moderator Emerita, Welcome Forum
***It is better to ask forgiveness than beg permission.***
Reply
Moderator Emerita, Welcome Forum
***It is better to ask forgiveness than beg permission.***
Reply
post #15 of 57

Here goes....

pants in us= underwear in UK (pants are called trousers)

napkins= feminine napkin in UK or diapers (napkins are serviettes)
post #16 of 57
Thread Starter 
cell - mobile
freeway-motorway
gas station - garage
gas - petrol
What is patriotism but the love of the food one ate as a child? ~Lin Yutang
Reply
What is patriotism but the love of the food one ate as a child? ~Lin Yutang
Reply
post #17 of 57
We use the word napkins when talking about table napkins... but use the word nappies for diapers. Serviettes is used for the cheap, paper napkins used in some chain-store type eating places.

Pram is the word for a larger baby carrier - from the word perambulator... we use buggy for the fold up type of what we used to call push-chairs.
post #18 of 57
I always thought "Bob's your uncle" was a Canadian term.
post #19 of 57
No, it's definitely British in origin. The version I am familiar with is that Lord Salisbury was the 'Bob' or Robert in the saying!

Bob's your uncle
post #20 of 57

being from british origin originally

;meaning most nzers, we have a lot of the same euphemisims but also different ones as well.

for ease of reading the nz stuff is on the left side american in the middle and british if needed is followed by asterix

rubbish - trash
truck * lorry
motorway- freeway*highway
dairy(local store that you buy milk from) *dairy (where cows hang out)
takeaways -takeout
fish and chip shop * chippie
chippie (builder) *chippie =fish and chip shop
lollies - candies*sweets
flatmates -roommates*flatshare
flat (a form of house) - appartment *house
asian, (we refer to east asian generally) *asian (refer to south asian generally)
sheep shaggers (freindly poke at australians)*sheep shaggers freindly poke at welshman):crazy::crazy:

backpack *rucksack
tramping -hiking
bush - forrest
rubber- eraser
snarlers -sausages
barbie - bbq
grill- broil
when life hands you lemons, make lemon gelee, lemon meringue pie, or any other dessert your heart desires

www.theunknownchef.com
www.theunknownchef.co.nz
www.shoebridge.co.nz
Reply
when life hands you lemons, make lemon gelee, lemon meringue pie, or any other dessert your heart desires

www.theunknownchef.com
www.theunknownchef.co.nz
www.shoebridge.co.nz
Reply
post #21 of 57
In the UK, a 'chippie' can be a chip shop or a joiner/carpenter!
We use motorway, not highway.
Asians are usually Indians or Pakistanis#
Chinese seems to cover Malays, chinese, HKC, and all points in-between!
Seaside or beach - I think lots of Americans refer to it as the shore?
post #22 of 57
Thanks for that Ishbel
we call it the beach here too
when life hands you lemons, make lemon gelee, lemon meringue pie, or any other dessert your heart desires

www.theunknownchef.com
www.theunknownchef.co.nz
www.shoebridge.co.nz
Reply
when life hands you lemons, make lemon gelee, lemon meringue pie, or any other dessert your heart desires

www.theunknownchef.com
www.theunknownchef.co.nz
www.shoebridge.co.nz
Reply
post #23 of 57
Thread Starter 
food terms I do not know the UK speak for - cheese whiz, cool whip, whipped butter, crackerjacks - I am not even sure if we can get them commercially here
What is patriotism but the love of the food one ate as a child? ~Lin Yutang
Reply
What is patriotism but the love of the food one ate as a child? ~Lin Yutang
Reply
post #24 of 57
Cheese Whiz used to be available at some of the supermarket chains, eg Tesco - but seems to have been dropped in favour of less additive-laden stuff!

An American friend of mine who lived in the UK for a number of years told me that she had never seen cool whip or an equivalent here.

Whipped butter? Do you mean that 'ready to spread from the fridge' stuff? Yes, it's widely available in every supermarket!

Don't know what crackerjacks are.
post #25 of 57
Crackerjacks are caramel corn. :)
post #26 of 57
The correct term is "Crackerjack".

doc
post #27 of 57
Thread Starter 
sorry for the typing error - 'crackerjack!':D also by whipped butter I mean the kind you get on pancakes at Denny's etc.
What is patriotism but the love of the food one ate as a child? ~Lin Yutang
Reply
What is patriotism but the love of the food one ate as a child? ~Lin Yutang
Reply
post #28 of 57
Torch = flashlight

Jim
post #29 of 57
I've seldom eaten pancakes when I've visited the USA - so I can't tell whether you and I are speaking about a similar product!
post #30 of 57
We say 'handbag' - USA says purse (I think)
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: The Late Night Cafe (off-topic)
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › General Discussions › The Late Night Cafe (off-topic) › This thread should proveto be a lot of FUN!