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This thread should proveto be a lot of FUN! - Page 2

post #31 of 57
Hey boot. That's trunk. :)
post #32 of 57
as a kid we always called them crackjacks. but we were kids. theres no good prizes in there anymore either. (
post #33 of 57

Love this thread!

Fanny (ahem-too polite to name it) vs Fanny (bottom)
Butt (end of cigarette) vs Butt (bottom)
Bum (bottom) vs Bum (derelict person)...I'll get off this theme now :)
Soft drink vs Soda
Chips vs Fries
Crisps vs Frito Lay
Shopping centre vs Mall
World Champion vs US world champion (e.g. baseball - oh ohh shouldn't have said that :suprise:)
Pronunciation difference this one - "fill-et" vs "fillay"
Root (bottom bits of a plant) vs Root (as in cheering for a team)
Capsicum vs Bell Pepper
Jam vs Jelly

that's all that springs to mind...for the moment :D
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #34 of 57

dc you have just made me think of some more

tomato sauce vs ketchup
mayonaise vs mayo
kumara vs sweet potato
chocolate leather or chocolate plastique vs candy clay
toffee apples vs candied apples
when life hands you lemons, make lemon gelee, lemon meringue pie, or any other dessert your heart desires

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www.theunknownchef.co.nz
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when life hands you lemons, make lemon gelee, lemon meringue pie, or any other dessert your heart desires

www.theunknownchef.com
www.theunknownchef.co.nz
www.shoebridge.co.nz
Reply
post #35 of 57
I don't think this was mentioned yet:

Sneakers (US) = Plimsoles (UK) = Running shoes (CAD)

also:

sleeveless undershirts <wife beaters> are called <Bruce Willis> in France (iconic from the movie Die Hard).

Luc H
I eat science everyday, do you?
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I eat science everyday, do you?
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post #36 of 57

Sorry to make you think Tessa :)

...but isn't kumara actually different from sweet potato?

Chocolate leather - sounds like something worn at kinky parties :lips:

Couch vs sofa
4 wheel drive vs SUV ( think they mean the same thing...)
Bus vs Coach
Dunny (australian) vs Washroom
Get out of my shop you idiot I've got your money you've got your purchase Vs Have a Great Day:lol:
Garage vs car dealership
Windcheater vs Sweater
Spa vs jaccuzi
Can vs Tin (tinned tomatoes etc)
Stripper vs Exotic dancer
Pub vs Bar
14th Jan 2007 vs 01/14/2007
Herbs vs Erbs - what's an Erb - I googled it and couldn't find it :p

Caravan Vs Trailer

....the list goes on, but I better get some work done!

DC
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #37 of 57
Just visited the US for the first time this year and noticed a lot of differences. I am from Australia and most of our language is tied up with the British so we use most of the same words.

When I was in McDonalds for breakfast in New York I found it unusual that what we would call scones over here is called biscuits over there. In Australia biscuits are what those in the US would call cookies.
Jenyfari from Only Cookware and Only Cookware Blog - A Consumer Guide to Cookware
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Jenyfari from Only Cookware and Only Cookware Blog - A Consumer Guide to Cookware
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post #38 of 57
Go to the Indian grocer. Mayonnaise is called salad cream. :) Does anyone really use that stuff straight up on their salad?
post #39 of 57
Heinz (and other manufacturers) sell 'Salad Cream' in the UK. It is a vile concoction with lots and lots of vinegar in the recipe!

What about WE say 'pavement' you say 'sidewalk'.

We call the first floor of a block the ground floor - the first floor is actually up one flight of stairs...!
post #40 of 57

some more

US v UK and IRE
awesome= not bad actually
candy= sweets
candy bar= chocolate bar (usually by brand)


I will clear this up
fanny= ladies bits (down there)

while on a theme
rack = something you have on the roof of your car or hang coats on....
post #41 of 57
diapers are nappies (or Pampers) LOL all else fails, use name brands...
car hood- bonnet
car trunk- boot

and what you call the large piece of upholstered furniture you sit on in your main room--- a sofa? couch? chesterfield? davenport? futon?
depends on where you are from.... LOL
Bon Vive' !
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Bon Vive' !
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post #42 of 57
I heard "fu*kwit" for the first time in the UK this summer. I should use that more often.
Outside of a dog, a book is a man's best friend. Inside of a dog it's too dark to read. - GM
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Outside of a dog, a book is a man's best friend. Inside of a dog it's too dark to read. - GM
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post #43 of 57
Harpua, I think that is an aussie word! In the same vernacular as 'bloody'!

I have been waiting for all the aussies to jump on the wagon and the side has been very quiet. Is that cos we use 'strine'? Even the kiwis use a different language to us! L&P, chocolate fush, fush'n'chups - *ducks for cover now!*

Sanga = sandwich
Barbie = bbq
Snag = sausage
sheila/bird = woman
mate = term of endearment or reference to a person
eg Good to see ya mate!
or: Maaaaaaaate! = Hello, haven't seen you for ages, **** you look good!
Kettle = jug (electric for boiling water)

Just a few off the top of the noggin = head
If you're not completely impressed - you haven't been watching me!
If you smoke after sex - you're doing it too fast.
I live in my own little world but it's ok, they know me here!
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If you're not completely impressed - you haven't been watching me!
If you smoke after sex - you're doing it too fast.
I live in my own little world but it's ok, they know me here!
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post #44 of 57
hehe PC don't get me started on strine sayings- there's too many, here's just a few....

"G'day maaate- 'ow are ya, ya ugly f**k?!?" - greeting for a best friend -generally men's talk

"Mate" can also be used in the negative - "I bloody hate you, mate"

"She'll be right" - "everything will be fine...I think...maybe...oh heck I'm unqualified but I'll offer my opinion anyway"

"You orright?" - How are you
"Owya goin'?" - How are you

"Fair dinkum!" - Oh really is that true?

"Bondi sanga" = Bondi sausage - relates to an incident where raw sewerage got flushed into the water at Bondi beach....ewwwww. I leave thte rest to your imagination

"Avagoodweegend" - I hope you have a good weekend
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #45 of 57
Heh, heh....I love being an Aussie.
Jenyfari from Only Cookware and Only Cookware Blog - A Consumer Guide to Cookware
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Jenyfari from Only Cookware and Only Cookware Blog - A Consumer Guide to Cookware
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post #46 of 57
Well, if we're talking lesser known 'English' languages (pace Aussies amongst us!) - what about Lallans, the 'other' Scots language?

I've goat a millyun!
post #47 of 57

Do Share

do share Ishbel. i find the scots ones so funny.
here is some particular to ireland

UK/ US v IRE

naughty= bold
cupboard= press
airing cupboard= hotpress
a fun time= great craic
post #48 of 57
How about Mae West?

"When I'm good, I'm Bad!
And when I'm Bad, I'm even Better"

Aust "Hoy Hoy" US "Hey Man, Waz Happening?"
Aust "Lizards" US "Crocodiles"
Aust "Bugs" US "Shrimp"
Aust "Barbie" US "Grill, or BBQ"
UK "Pretty Poly" US "Money"

doc
post #49 of 57
no no no ya tart:beer::bounce::crazy::) :p we dont say fush and chups , its just that we speak better than you lot and you dont hear us correctly , so when we say fish and chips all you hear is the us bits :p:p:p:p:p:p


tart in NZ and Aus is a term for a cheeky witch, in american its a pie and in uk its a dodgy woman and a pie:lol::lol:

and we say snarlers Auz say snags, brits say sausages
when life hands you lemons, make lemon gelee, lemon meringue pie, or any other dessert your heart desires

www.theunknownchef.com
www.theunknownchef.co.nz
www.shoebridge.co.nz
Reply
when life hands you lemons, make lemon gelee, lemon meringue pie, or any other dessert your heart desires

www.theunknownchef.com
www.theunknownchef.co.nz
www.shoebridge.co.nz
Reply
post #50 of 57
Thread Starter 
In the UK we are in Autumn (Fall!!) although today it felt like Summer (summer - for those of you from OZ and other JUST English speaking countries!) - Just kidding guys!! I am an arab/Indian brought up in LA - I hardly have room to talk - although I do speak spanish!!
What is patriotism but the love of the food one ate as a child? ~Lin Yutang
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What is patriotism but the love of the food one ate as a child? ~Lin Yutang
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post #51 of 57
So many of the Lallans (and Doric, the 'other' Scots language specific to the north east of our country).... are similar or the same as Irish. We have press, we have hot press and we also have the 'craic'. More of a convivial exchange rather than a 'fun time'!

What about ashet? A serving/cooking dish, from the French (don't forget, my country had strong ties to France... think Mary of Guise and Mary Queen of Scots) 'assiette'.

We have gigot chops - pronounced jiggot here, rather than the French jeego...
post #52 of 57
eggplant=brinjal=aubergine... or at least varieties of the same sort of plant.
post #53 of 57
"710" is a part of a car engine. Anybody know about that?
post #54 of 57

has this been mentioned

UK IRL v US

gas= something you cook with (or heat your home)

so
diesel and petrol = gas

US v UK IRL

ho!= garden tool...

I had some v confused friends when Wyclef sang "2 just cos she dances go go don make her a ho no"... one asked whats a hono...

i watched Jerry Springer so i could translate!!:talk:
post #55 of 57
Jerry Springer is on the cutting edge of perv
post #56 of 57
LOl LOL oh that one made me laugh....
In many american songs (especially rap music) they often say "hoe" or "ho" - but I have actually hear a few now say "whore" - meaning an unscrupulous woman.

I noticed we never gave a good explantion of crackjacks for those unfamiliar with it... it is a snack food- carmel coated popcorn and peanuts, and it used to come in a rectangular, red and white striped, cardboard box. And inside somewhere would be a little toy of some sort - a ring or top or ect... kind of like english Christmas crackers.... Crackerjacks are often mentioned in old movies, they are sort of an american tradition... at least up through my generation. Many kids now a days might not have ever had them.
Bon Vive' !
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Bon Vive' !
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post #57 of 57
US--UK
phone me in the morning--ring me up in the morning
stop by in the morning---knock me up in the morning
Gelatin(Jello)---Jelly
Evaporated Milk--Shaky Milk

and Crackerjack, now has lousy prizes and almost no peanuts!!Whaaa
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