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Low and Slow cooking

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 
I have been playing with times and temps for a lot of years. I usually cook beef for a min. of 14 hours at 225-250 with the beleif that longer cooking time is better. My Low n Slow Alberta Beef has been my signiture dish and is well known. My question is do longer cooking times really enhance the end result?:cool:
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post #2 of 12
I think that would depend on the cut of beef. Low and slow would be great for those cuts that are tougher, higher in fat and have more sinewy connective tissue running throughout. The slow surface caramelization and melting of the fat would permeate the meat with flavor and allow the tenderization of the tough tissues.
However, I would not recommend it for those cuts like top & round or tenderloin as they don't really have much inherent flavor due to the low fat content. This method of cooking would overcook the beef and make it tough and chewy.
JMHO....

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post #3 of 12
What Foodnfoto said - get the right cut for it, don't waste the more tender stuff - it will just end up as rags.

I did a slow cooked whole chuck yesterday - pot roast - on the stove top. Turned out really well, about 4 hours. Using the rest for sliced beef sandwhiches.

There's a local place that does a 24 hour slow cooked rib-eye, about 2 inches thick. It's soooo nice. Costs a small fortune but its worth it! Wish I knew exactly how they do it....
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
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post #4 of 12
now that sounds delish DC i love rib eye its my favourite cut of steak

maybe if you ask them nicely they might give you a rough idea of how they cook it
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when life hands you lemons, make lemon gelee, lemon meringue pie, or any other dessert your heart desires

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www.shoebridge.co.nz
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post #5 of 12
Reckon I might just do that next time Tessa. They prob do it much like Heston Blumenthal's standing rib roast - torch it to sear the meat then long long slow slowww cooking.

Rib eye is great - its only been widely available here in the last few years. It beats fillet hands down - you get the softness of fillet steak but the flavour from all the fatty marbling. Pretty hard to beat :)

I love cooking pork low and slow - not that its much good for nice crackling but the flavour of the fat really gets into the meat and it just flakes off the bone. My preference is for shoulder/forequarter roast, the leg, to me, is over-rated. (Sometimes I'll buy extra pork rind and cook that separately while the shoulder rests). Only do one every few months (home cook) but love to splurge and break the diet for a treat hehe.

Lamb shanks are great done slow too, there's no other way. Even lamb chops improve from a slow cook under onions and a sauce, and mutton too is great this way. Dunno why mutton is out of popularity these days. It actually has flavour, unlike some lamb.

DC
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #6 of 12
My mother would never consider a rare steak....ever.

But she also had a knack for cooking a well done steak that was tender. I've never figuared it out, but in all fairness I get hang up on "do I want to experiment with this great looking piece of meat, taking it past rare, just to see if I can get it tender and well done?"

And alas, I then become weak and pull it from the pan, rare.
post #7 of 12
For me, long slow roasts and braises are the ultimate way to go for cooking meat. Long slow roast for bigger cuts, and braises for the smaller cuts. Yes, its all about retaining moisture (fat moisture to be exact), and choosing the right cut. This is what produces the juicy and tender roasts we all strive for. Add to that, the right amount of carmelization and seasoning to the outer crust and you have a winner of a roast!

The real trick is to not overdo it! There's a fine line between sliced roast beef and shredded! Unless of course you're making Carne Asada. Just my $.02. ;)
post #8 of 12

I have learned to brine all of meats which has resulted on moisture and tenderness in my results and after brining I then cook all of my meats slow and low.  For a template I use Andrew Schloss's cookbook "Cooking Slow" for my base recipes.  For example when I cook my chicken I put it in a 450 degree oven for 15 minutes to kill bacteria.  Breast down for this and the turn it over and drop the oven temp to 170 degrees for 6-8 hours or until the chicken reaches the 170 degree internal temp.  At 170 degrees it will never get over cooked or dried out.  I just did a wing brine for some chicken drumsticks and then put them in my Nesco at 170 and after 6 hrs with a little force the meat falls off the bone and is so moist.  Im ready for the Superbowl.  Im waiting for the April release of slow and low from the culinary institute it was published in reverence and respect for the instructor who passed away.  He taught slow and low cooking at the institute.  I have now bought brining buckets that are made specifically for brining.  You lower the locking disk into the food grade bucket so it submerges the meat into the brine then you turn it and it locks into the place and holds the meat in place so its totally submerged.  Slow and low is not just for BBQ

I never cook anything in a slow cooker.  It just doesn't work for me.

post #9 of 12

maybe they sous vide the prime rib?

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post #10 of 12

What don't you like about slow cookers?

post #11 of 12

Everytime I open mindedly return to the slow cooker to give it a try I am disappointed in the end result.  I'm not satisfied with the food texture or bland flavor.  I have checked the internal temp of my cooker and it records a 180 temp, but Im never satisfied with my results and for some reason whether its the size or how it heats it does not compare to slow cooking in an oven for me.  I was raised by a mother who was a Swedish farm girl that pleased her guests with fantastic cooked meals. For an example I had brought her a racoon that I harvested in the field when I was a teenager.  I was very skeptical and aprehensive of the day of service as to what I would be served.  My doubt  was erased as it was served in a cream sauce and when I asked for more of the serving I was told there was no more left.  That was just one day that I was again reminded of how lucky I was. The slow cooker does not give me the results to warrant praise and is below the standard of my time and experience.  Even in the reviews of the cookbook Slow Cooker Revolution you will find comments saying that the effort was outstanding but it still does not improve the quality produced by the appliance.

post #12 of 12

I have nothing against resuscitating old threads but would suggest that if you would like to continue this discussion please do remember the request posted at the entrance to this forum

Quote:
 This forum is reserved for professionals in the catering industry only. All are welcome to read the discussions, but please refrain from posting if you have never worked as a professional caterer.

 

Food & Cooking would be a great forum in which to renew this discussion. Thanks everyone.

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