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Does anyone cook with racoon?

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
Does anyone cook with racoon?

I have a large number of racoons on my property, does anyone have good racoon recipes?
post #2 of 19
Many of the racoons here (NH) carry rabies. I would check with your health dept before carving up a racoon.
post #3 of 19
Thread Starter 
:crazy: That was a joke.
post #4 of 19

we dont have raccoons here but

i can give you a good recipe for elephant stew , and also a parrot pie , and we cant forget about the deep fried skunk recipe as well:rolleyes::roll::crazy:
when life hands you lemons, make lemon gelee, lemon meringue pie, or any other dessert your heart desires

www.theunknownchef.com
www.theunknownchef.co.nz
www.shoebridge.co.nz
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when life hands you lemons, make lemon gelee, lemon meringue pie, or any other dessert your heart desires

www.theunknownchef.com
www.theunknownchef.co.nz
www.shoebridge.co.nz
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post #5 of 19
If you are having trouble with visitations from raccoons, one remedy I've tried is to scatter moth balls around the perimeter of the area you'd like to keep them out of. The smell seems to discourage them.
If they keep raiding your trash cans, duct-tape a few mothballs to the inside of the lid and get some strong bungee cords to secure the lids.

Of course, you can smell the moth balls too and so can your neighbors, but it works pretty well.
Does pretty well at discouraging skunks too.

www.foodandphoto.com

Liquored up and laquered down,
She's got the biggest hair in town!

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www.foodandphoto.com

Liquored up and laquered down,
She's got the biggest hair in town!

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post #6 of 19
I have tried cooking with raccoon but he wouldn't keep his paws out of the pot!
Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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Wisdom comes with age, but sometimes age comes alone.
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post #7 of 19
Believe it or not, some folks do. Dig "White Trash Cooking".

http://books.google.com/books?id=gIQ...print&ct=title
post #8 of 19

Cooking raccoon

Check out Cy Littlebee's guide to Cooking Fish and Game for 5 recipes for 'coon. Compiled in 1981. You may have been joking with your comment, but plenty of folks eat 'coon.
post #9 of 19
I tend to look like one when I forget to take off my sunglasses in the summer sun! Does that count?
What is patriotism but the love of the food one ate as a child? ~Lin Yutang
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What is patriotism but the love of the food one ate as a child? ~Lin Yutang
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post #10 of 19
Well, I scrolled through the whole Index of "White Trash Cooking" and was disappointed to find no recipe for Groundhog. It was a much-appreciated dish in rural Maryland, at least, about sixty years ago.

Never tried it, myself. :p

I dimly remember a song about it- one line described a diner:

"groundhog grease drippin' off his chin..."

I think the tune was "Camptown Racetrack."

Mike
travelling gourmand
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travelling gourmand
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post #11 of 19
abe you slay me! Bwahahahahahahaha!
post #12 of 19
Mike, I don't understand the song lyrics.

Unlike, say, possum, which tends to be greasy, groundhog is pretty similar to beef. And why not? They eat the same thing a cow does. Basically, groundhog looks (and tastes) like grass-fed beef.

Racoon is good oven-roasted with sweet potatoes. It, too, can sometimes be on the greasy side, but not as bad as possum.

Best tasting of the small game animals, IMO, is squirrel. It just takes a bunch of them to make a decent platter.

Most versatile of the small game animals would be rabbit.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #13 of 19
Thread Starter 
Does baking racoon meat to 165 kill rabies?
post #14 of 19
Like Possem, these days you will want to trap the coon live...pen him
and finish him on some cleaner food for a while......meats not bad, but,
won't compare to domesticated animals....probably my favorite would be
braised......I do agree with the previous post about squirrel, chipped bbq
squirrel is right nice.....anyone tried the mashed nuts in the stomach sack
of a squirrel, had a friend who's mom would dry the mashed nuts from the squirrel stomach and garnish her chocolate cakes with them....possem is probably my least favorite....the fat tastes so sour.....not so good eatin!!!!!!!!!!
post #15 of 19
stomach nuts....ok, that's a new one....butchering not an issue, cooking pigs head no problem....but just reading about nuts in a squirrels stomach served on cake is grossing me out.

Soulard Farmer's Market has a couple of "farmers" that sell skinned critters that have their tails still in place...beavers, possom, racoons, muskrats....etc.
not tried any....but have heard of KY's recipe of coons and sweet potatoes.
Several years ago when planning a rabbit ravioli in carrot sauce (yes for easter and yes we are very sick people) a good pastry chef friend said to combine the flavors of food the animal eats....kinda made sense.....in the summer most produce grown at the same time in the same place goes together.
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #16 of 19
evenstephen...I threw up a little in my mouth on that one. :sick:

I've eaten squirrel (fried and smothered) yum. Armadillo (barbequed) yum. Crocodile (many ways) yum. We used to raise rabbits and used to hunt them, major yum.

But coon and possum just leave me hangin'. As does Nutria. Too greasy peasy for this Texas girl.
post #17 of 19
ooooo nutria, Chef John Folse was hired to promote cooking/eating nutria in S. Louisiana....people could not get past the rat tail. Just too rodentish....and those cajuns (if we were in Louisiana they would have such a non-pc name) will eat anything.
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #18 of 19
Just so everyone knows, I don't eat vermin much anymore.....as a child
I was exposed to a whole lot of country food. Turkey fries, possem, coon,
squirrel, etc. None really taste as good as a chicken from the yard or a pasture fed pig. They do seem to have different uses though....in Mexico
Possem broth is supposedly good for boils, young iguana blood for TB, etc.,
etc. Blue Zebra....sorry to make you throw up a little in your mouth....the
nut thing was absolutely true....something in the stomach sweetens the nuts and when they are dried and sprinkled on the cake, they are excellent. I reckon I would eat about anything if it tasted ok, no matter what, if I was hungry, but, as for now, I can afford the norm, domesticated animals....except for turkey fries, you just have to fry up a bunch of real fresh ones, a little hot sauce....so much nicer than rocky mountain oysters.
post #19 of 19
LOL :roll:
Jenyfari from Only Cookware and Only Cookware Blog - A Consumer Guide to Cookware
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Jenyfari from Only Cookware and Only Cookware Blog - A Consumer Guide to Cookware
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