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WeightWatchers Recipes Question

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
What do the point values associated with WeightWatchers recipe signify or relate to? Thanks!

Shel
post #2 of 10
I'm pretty sure it's fat grams and total calories. Looking at the carb counts on their frozen meals, I'm fairly sure they don't count carbs. :eek:
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post #3 of 10
There is an exact formula and I will get it when my wife replies.

Here is Heidi's latest market launch:

http://www.weightwatchers.com/shop/c...1&navid=moreww
post #4 of 10
My friend did weight watchers with the point system. It worked something like this. You have a daily total for the points you can eat for the day. Eat what you like until you reach your points limit. He had something like 16 points or so. A can of Coke was 4 points. He quickly stopped drinking his two cokes a day at work so he could have enough points to eat on and the pounds came off.

I don't know the exact formula, but that's what I understood of his experience.

Phil
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #5 of 10
(Looking at the book):

A 37 yr. old male, 5'10" tall, who weighs 200 lbs and is fairly inactive would get 33 points/day. Plus an additional 35 points on a weekly basis.
Most veggies are zero points; a 3oz beef portion is 5 pts; a large bagel is 6pts, a cup of rice 4pts, small potato 3pts. When you add fiber foods, such as beans or whole grain items, the fiber reduces your points for a given item.

You get in trouble when you start doing combination foods, like chicken parmigiana, 5oz, with sauce, 10 points. Add some garlic bread, 1 slice, another 5 points, and the 2 Tbsp. of dressing on your zero point salad greens will cost you 4 points.

when you join, you are given LOTS of information on food point values, and you can buy others, such as fast food restaurant data. Also you are given a slider calculator where you enter the calories, match it up with the fiber and the fat grams to get the points.

There are also 'good health guidelines' such as eating 5 servings of fruits and veggies/day; choosing whole grain; 2 servings of dairy/day; water; healthy oils, and adequate protein.

It's really a very healthy plan.

The above is called the "flex" plan; there is also a "core" plan in which you don't count points, eat till you're full of certain foods which are mostly fruits, veggies, lean protiens, legumes, beans, etc.
post #6 of 10
I was just asking a friend about this last week. She has had success doing the WW points system. Here are a couple of free links she gave me:

Weight Watchers Point Calculator
Weight Watchers Point Calculator - Weight Watchers Recipes
Dining Out Guide with Weight Watcher Points, eat right & lose weight!
Generic Food's Weight Watchers Points


I really think I'd have a lot of trouble figuring out my points for each day. I eat few prepared foods and rarely cook the same meal twice. I think I'd spend a lot of time researching nutritional information and trying to calculate the points for each dish. lol
post #7 of 10
Thread Starter 
Thanks to all you helpful people who replied.

I'm not going on the WeightWatchers program, but I have access to about 20 or so of their recipe books, and all the recipes have a point value. Some of the recipes seem to be quite good, and others are easy to tweak in one direction or another. I like quite a few of the recipes in the "In One Pot" book. A lot better than Rachael Ray's 30-minute meals.

Shel
post #8 of 10
Kuan, some friends on a weight loss board I'm on were talking about these soups. The women were glad to have them for a quick "on-program" lunch option. I read the labels and found they're VERY high in sodium (which makes you retain water = weight gain for many).

I tried one of Progresso's 45% less sodium soups (the Italian Wedding soup) and it wasn't bad- for a quick meal. To be honest, I wouldn't buy the product above because of the sodium content.

Sodium will be the next component of processed food to be a concern. First fat, then sugar, next will be salt.
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post #9 of 10
Points per serving equals

calories divide by 50

plus

fat divided by 12

minus

fiber divided by 5

(for points calculation you can have a maximum of four grams of fiber, even if the item has a hundred grams)

So if you look at a can of potted meat for example, and it has 200 calories, 10 grams of fat, and 8 grams of fiber...

200/50 + 10/12 + 4/5 (you can only enter a max of 4 grams of fiber, even though each serving has 8)

equals 4.033 or 4 points per serving.



Mezz you can email her about the salt. :D
post #10 of 10
Thread Starter 
Thanks so much - this and some other posts have made the subject very clear. Thanks to all who jumped in.

Shel
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