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What's a Compound Stock?

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
As I understand it, it means a stock made with broth or stock from a previous batch. Is that correct?

Recently I made chicken broth using a weak broth made earlier, and the results were superb. A deep, rich, chicken flavor, nice gelatin, and a gorgeous yellow-amber color.

Shel
post #2 of 10
That's my understanding of it. Sometimes it's called a double stock?

Phil
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #3 of 10
Blah starting to get bogged down in terminology. Everything after a stock is gravy. :D
post #4 of 10
It's a remoulage:chef: I do it all the time, Take an initial stock and use it like it is water for the second stock. You can also reboil the bones/veg after the drain and use it for the next stock.
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'We're ALL amateurs; It's just that some of us are more professional about it than others'. - George Carlin
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post #5 of 10
I thought Remoulage is reboiling the bones from an earlier stock, not the stock itself.

Phil
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #6 of 10
My sentiments exactly!
post #7 of 10
Right, That is what I said. I think :smiles:
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One time a guy pulled a knife on me. I could tell it wasn't a professional job; it had butter on it.- Rodney Dangerfield -


'We're ALL amateurs; It's just that some of us are more professional about it than others'. - George Carlin
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One time a guy pulled a knife on me. I could tell it wasn't a professional job; it had butter on it.- Rodney Dangerfield -


'We're ALL amateurs; It's just that some of us are more professional about it than others'. - George Carlin
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post #8 of 10
So a remoulage is a second/bone stock?

I think what Shel is doing is using a second stock perhaps, then adding fresh ingredients to make another stock, much richer and tastier. I guess you could get the same by reducing a first stock (chook, veg, etc) to concentrate the flavours?
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #9 of 10
A remoulage is not a full on stock, and I would not advise using one as a substitute for a stock. As stated above the remoulage is made from the bones that had been the base of a stock. When you make a stock you've got your bones, veg/herb aromatics, and water. At some point the aromatics give up all their flavour to the water and they become little more than pulp and fibre. The bones will also give up most of their flavour, but sooner or latter the water (now stock) will be concerntrate to the point that no appreciable flavour will be added. The bones, however still have something to offer. Once they've been decanted out you can simmer them down in fresh water for several hour to extract any remaining gelatine. This liquid is the remoulage. It won't have much flavour, or colour but it will have body. The remoulage becomes a great base for you next batch of stock as it can still absorb flavour but already has a good texture.

All of that said I can't say if a compound stock is one that uses a remoulage base. I've not heard the term before.

-Al
post #10 of 10
Thread Starter 
Yes, that's essentially what I did. The poultry store I frequent gives away free chicken breast bones, and they usually have a lot of meat on them. So, I simmer five or six pounds of them until the meat is just about done, take the meat off the breast bones which my cat and I enjoy as a snack, or which I throw into veg soup, or make chicken salad with, etc. The broth has a nice chicken flavor, but it's quite light, which is fine for some, but not all, applications.

At some point I'll make a second batch of broth, this time with some chicken thigh and leg bones, chicken wings, whole thighs and legs, and maybe some necks if I have any handy, and instead of using water I'll use some or all of the first batch of stock as the liquid, which has been waiting in the freezer. The results are superb.

Since the chicken breasts make such a light broth, even when cooked for quite a while, reducing the broth doesn't yield anywhere near the flavor as the second batch of broth.

Shel
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