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What do bakers like to get from Santa?

post #1 of 27
Thread Starter 
You hardcore bakers out there, please help.

My wife's the baker in the house and I want to get her something nice from Santa... online vendors would be okay, it can arrive in January and still be effective.

She just got the Cooks Illustrated baking book and loves it.

She's not shy about buying her own pans and equipment, but tends to limit her ingredients to what you can get at the local supermarket. I was thinking perhaps exotic/expensive ingredients that make a big difference would be the way to go...

Vanilla beans? Superfine cooking chocolate? Your suggestions?

Thanks for your help.
post #2 of 27
Thread Starter 
Crudeau: Get the chocolate from a bakery supply place ... do you mean, don't buy it online?

[This message has been edited by Live_to_cook (edited 12-18-2000).]
post #3 of 27
Where do you live? We can help you find venders near by!
For christmas I would love to get some great baking books (payard, neo classical pastries, pastry arts magazine, chocolate magazine, etc.), antique art prints of pastry advertisments, unique cookie cutters, aprons, chef coat, wonderful paper pans, anything non stick and high temperature resistant, plastic scrapers and a mixer, bread machine, rolling pins, an assistant to clean up my mess, baking lessons in NYC, or Napa Valley!
hope this list helps you too!!!!
bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
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bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
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post #4 of 27
mm, a big can of sevarome hazelnut paste
"Nothing quite like the feeling of something newl"
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"Nothing quite like the feeling of something newl"
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post #5 of 27
How about a Penzey's gift certificate? Try them at penzeys.com.
Moderator Emerita, Welcome Forum
***It is better to ask forgiveness than beg permission.***
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Moderator Emerita, Welcome Forum
***It is better to ask forgiveness than beg permission.***
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post #6 of 27
How about a gift basket with everything in it for either pies, cakes, cookies or bread, you choose the theme according to what your wife like to make.

In the basket, put all the tools needed, ingredients.

Or make one basket with just expensive ingredients like dried cherry and blueberry, macademia nuts etc.
When I get a little money, I buy books. And if there is any left over, I buy food.

- Desiderius Erasmus
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When I get a little money, I buy books. And if there is any left over, I buy food.

- Desiderius Erasmus
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post #7 of 27
M brown, I love pastry arts magazine.
The two things I would buy a pastry chef are.
an Icecream maker with a removable bowl for easy clean up. And a 2 inch thick Italian marble slab for dough and sugar work.
Also I would by 200 pastry brushes because me and all my cooks are constantly stealing his
Please don't tell
cc
Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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post #8 of 27
Do not pay excessive chocolate prices!!!
Right now Paris Gourmet, 1800 PASTRY 1, has a new line of chocolate called choconoel for a great price, 3 to 5 dollars per pound. Look for good prices by buying from purveyers in bulk and either gifting or splitting the cost with friends, family or even try a local baker or restaurant. If you pay C.O.D, you could do really well!
Also try Uster imports, Swiss Challet, Harry Wills, DairyLand, Otto Brem, D Rosen, WhiteBakers and other purveyers in your city.
Please, beware of retail on baking items, you could get taken to the cleaners!!!
bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
Reply
bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
Reply
post #9 of 27
Thread Starter 
Thank you for all your replies and suggestions... I knew I came to the right place.
post #10 of 27
Thread Starter 
m brown -- I live in Buffalo, NY... I couldn't find a Paris Gourmet site, do you know of one or only the phone number? I would buy my wife a large brick of chocolate but she's not done much chocolatier work, more baking ... of course if she decided not to make candy she could still eat it (or is it strictly cooking stuff?)
post #11 of 27
Thread Starter 
Nick.Shu: Hazelnut paste? Sounds like it would fit the expensive and exotic characteristics... what's it used for?
post #12 of 27
Thread Starter 
cape chef -- Pastry brushes, now that's something she needs that's always aggravating her. Last time she made tiropita (Greek cheese pie with phyllo) she threatened it was her last because all the pastry brushes she buys lose bristles ... can you recommend a brand that's sturdier? Thanks for your help.
post #13 of 27
Visit www.bigtray.com they have good products and excellent customer service. Their boar brushes are great. I've used mine often and it never lost a hair.
When I get a little money, I buy books. And if there is any left over, I buy food.

- Desiderius Erasmus
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When I get a little money, I buy books. And if there is any left over, I buy food.

- Desiderius Erasmus
Reply
post #14 of 27
Thread Starter 
Boar brushes? Sounds scary but .. thanks Sisi.
post #15 of 27
live_to_cook,
Home depot, isle # 4
best darn brushes you can buy......and then you can paint your kitchen when your done
cc
Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
Reply
Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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post #16 of 27
Would gift certificates work? If so you could ceratinly expand her palate beyond the local supermarket. As someone who likes to bake I would be pretty damned happy with anyone who gave me a gift certificate to www.kingarthurflour.com. More funky flours than I knew existed! For vinilla beans etc. you might try penzeys.com
Kyle
"At weddings, my Aunts would poke me in the ribs and cackle "You're next!". They stopped when I started doing the same to them at funerals." D. Barry
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"At weddings, my Aunts would poke me in the ribs and cackle "You're next!". They stopped when I started doing the same to them at funerals." D. Barry
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post #17 of 27
ok, for those wanting to source cheaper callebaut - try sicao - callebaut recipe manufactured in singapore - belgian choc made with asian labour costs. Apparently for a couverture, it is little bit more temperamental than the belgian stuff, but cost will overwhelm that.

Hazelnut paste, usable in pastries and ice cream - ive recently made sicao milk choc couverture and sevarome hazelnut paste icecream - it is quite warm here right now - 30 - 42 degs celsius. warning - sevarome paste is a lot more potent than, say, carma hazelnut paste. The skies the limit. Im thinking about hazelnut and chocolate brioche ATM.
"Nothing quite like the feeling of something newl"
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"Nothing quite like the feeling of something newl"
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post #18 of 27
P.S those using bristle brushes, i hope you guys are soaking the brushes in warm water first.

This releases the loose bristles.
"Nothing quite like the feeling of something newl"
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"Nothing quite like the feeling of something newl"
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post #19 of 27
OOOO NIck -shu...bacci ice cream and bread!!!do you put love notes in them too?

They got all my ideas....LeNotre's first book on baking...visit a restaurant supply house for fun stuff.

The only thing I can add to the food lists are liquors....Grand Mariner/Triple Sec, Brandy, Cognac, Armangac
I rehydrate my dried fruits in liquors.

Concentric cutters are good. I really use my tiny animal cutters.

Nick Malgiari gives good pastry classes in NYC...Peter Kump School.
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #20 of 27
Live to cook,

Does your wife have a Silpat? If not, I guarantee it'll make her happy.

What specifically does she like to bake? ie: bread, pastries, cookies, working with phyllo, working with puff pastry, muffins, pizza?
post #21 of 27
Thread Starter 
cape chef: Home Depot? Are you putting me on? Because that's certainly one place within reach.
post #22 of 27
Thread Starter 
cchiu: She likes making cakes, cookies, breads, pizza... she's long been a good "basics" baker who's looking to stretch out a bit. She loves chocolate but has never made fancy candies... not particularly fond of nuts... quite comfortable with phyllo work... never used puff pastry that I know of but if it's the stuff that comes frozen in sheets I'd consider it well with in her range of ability... if that helps.

What's a Silpat?
post #23 of 27
A Silpat is a mat made out of silicone I think. They come in different shape and size. You line your baking sheet or pan with one and it gives a non-stick surface. It can stand temperature between -40°F to +580°F. Nothing stick to it, not even hot sugar. Be careful where you buy one, at some stores online they are very overpriced. Before buying one make sure you have measure your pan, so it will fit properly. You can see on at this place:

http://www.bigtray.com/productdetail...&sku=MAT321005


CapeChef,

I thought of the hardware store for pieces of PVC pipes instead of those overprice metal rings but never though of checking the brushes.
When I get a little money, I buy books. And if there is any left over, I buy food.

- Desiderius Erasmus
Reply
When I get a little money, I buy books. And if there is any left over, I buy food.

- Desiderius Erasmus
Reply
post #24 of 27
Ok, that helps. First of all, it's so thoughtful of you to ask for your wife in a forum like this!

1. What is a silpat?
A silpat is a patented European flexible cookie sheet/pan liner made of made of woven glass fabric impregnated with food grade silicones that is reusable up thousands of times in the oven and freezer. It withstands temperatures from -40'F to 800'F. You don't need to "grease" the pan in any way. Basically, nothing sticks to it. (average cost usually from $20-$25) for full sized sheet.

An article on them from Cook's Illustrated editor: Solutions to Sticky Situations http://www.cheftalkcafe.com/ubb/Foru...ML/000022.html

Sources for Silpat: http://www.p4online.com/silnonsticba.html
http://www.restaurant-store.com/silnonbakmat.html
http://bridgekitchenware.com/cgi-bin...an+and+Silpat/

2. Microplane Zester
I recommend this as highly as the Silpat. It's hard to impress me, especially if I've heard about it. I'd heard about it for a year before I ever got to try one and knew it would be really good. It's totally amazing. Did you ever think zesting a lemon or grating nutmeg could be a pleasure? (Also garlic, ginger, and parmesan.) I didn't. It is SO EASY. I was completely stunned, the zest comes out lighter than a feather! (about $16-$18)
http://www.microplane.com/html/kitchen.html

2. Vanilla Beans.... you can't go wrong with fresh vanilla beans or any number of flavorings of pure (not imitation) extracts.

3. Kataifi, a form of phyllo, if she hasn't used it, that might be fun.

4. How about fresh cake yeast or a 25 year old or more sourdough yeast starter? Or recipes for starters like, grape starter or apple starter?

5. King Arthur's Flour printed catalog (I just got mine yesterday): http://www.kingarthurflour.com/cgibi...98090664332609

or browse online: http://www.kingarthurflour.com/cgibi...17239464332609

6. On those hardware store brushes, stick with the natural bristle as opposed to synthetic bristle brushes.

7. How about cookbooks from some of the best bakers in the business?

“Nancy Silverton’s Breads from the La Brea Bakery: Recipes for the Connoisseur“
(Villard, 1996; $34.95)

“Nancy Silverton’s Pastries from the La Brea Bakery“
(Villard, 2000; $35)

La Brea Bakery Web Site http://www.labreabakery.com/home.htm

If you haven't browsed thru this site, I highly recommend it: http://www.betterbaking.com/

For an ultimate challenge for your wife, print this recipe for her (up for 2 weeks)

MAKING CROISSANTS WITH NANCY http://www.marthastewart.com/televis...ScheduleType=1

SUGAR BUNS WITH NANCY http://www.marthastewart.com/televis...ScheduleType=1

DANISH DIAMONDS WITH NANCY http://www.marthastewart.com/televis...ScheduleType=1

You could go to www.google.com or www.amazon.com and and type in baking cookbooks.

Some ideas...

Artisan Baking Across America: The Breads, The Bakers, The Best Recipes
by Maggie Glezer, Ben Fink(Photographer). Hardcover (October 2, 2000)

Cookies Unlimited
by Nick Malgieri, Tom Eckerle(Photographer). Hardcover (October 2000)

Baking With Julia : Based on the Pbs Series Hosted by Julia Child
by Dorie Greenspan, et al. Hardcover (November 1996)

The Pie and Pastry Bible
by Rose Levy Beranbaum(Introduction). Hardcover (November 1998)

Professional Baking, Trade, 3rd Edition
by Wayne Gisslen. Hardcover (October 3, 2000)

Butter Sugar Flour Eggs : Whimsical Irresistible Desserts
by Gale Gand, et al. Hardcover (October 1999)

The King Arthur Flour 200th Anniversary Cookbook/Dedicated to the Pure Joy of Baking
by Brinna Sands. Paperback (September 1992)

How to Bake : The Complete Guide to Perfect Cakes, Cookies, Pies, Tarts, Breads, Pizzas, Muffins, Sweet and Savory
by Nick Malgieri, Tom Eckerle(Photographer). Hardcover (October 1995)

The Village Baker : Classic Regional Breads from Europe and America
by Joe Ortiz. Paperback (March 1997)

The Magnolia Bakery Cookbook: Old-Fashioned Recipes From New York's Sweetest Bakery
by Jennifer Appel, et al. Hardcover (November 1999)

The Making of a Pastry Chef: Recipes and Inspiration from America's Best Pastry Chefs
by Andrew MacLauchlan, Scott Vlaun. Paperback (September 13, 1999)

Betty Crocker's Best of Baking : More Than 350 of America's Favorite Recipes
by Betty Crocker. Hardcover (August 7, 1997)

The Fannie Farmer Baking Book
by Marion Cunningham, Lauren Jarrett(Illustrator). Hardcover (April 1996)

Sweet Celebrations : The Art of Decorating Beautiful Cakes
by Kate Manchester, et al. Hardcover (October 1999)

The Italian Baker
by Carol Field. Hardcover (March 1991)

I'm sure everyone else will have great recommendations!
post #25 of 27
Thread Starter 
Holy cow cchiu and everybody, some of these suggestions are smack on... silpat, all right, and lerned a word to boot... thank you.
post #26 of 27
Thread Starter 
By the way, got her a pair of silpats from bigtray.com... *just* the ticket for a woman who loves to bake and hates to scrub. Thanks for all the good advice, I think I'm set for Valentines Day and anniversary and her birthday and...
post #27 of 27
I would love a bookshelf for all my cookbooks.
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