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what is a japonaise? and other questions...

post #1 of 38
Thread Starter 
Have a question, have an answer?
What is the weiredest thing a customer/boss asked you for?

japonaise=meringue layers made with ground toasted almonds. great with ganach and butter cream. (light and heavy, yin and yang)
bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
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bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
Reply
post #2 of 38
M Brown,

"japonaise" is actually a item,usually meat that is garnished with Chinese or japonese artichokes. I have not been able to find japonaise as it refers to meringue. Funny though, My pastry chef was also stumped when he heard what I told him it meant. Because he also refers to this almond meringue as you do. I have also heard this type of meringue called Jocoba (sp)But what you refer to I understand as being Fond de succes
Can you enlighten me on where you found that term used for meringue....You've peaked my interest TIA.
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Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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post #3 of 38
I'm sorry!!Back to the question.

I make this App called seafood martini. In which I place In a martini glass a little chiffinade of lettuce a couple of 16/20 shrimp a little Maryland crab meat and lobster medallions. I plop a little vodka and lemon sorbet in the middle and a little grated horseradish remoularde sauce.....well one time a customer asked one of the servers to ask the Chef if he could take out the vodka from the sorbet because she didn't drink..Guess what the scary part was? The server actually asked me to do it. I looked at him like I was from outer space,slowly smiled....and said just get a life
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Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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post #4 of 38
Thread Starter 
This was the first pastry paper i had to write for RJ Coppage, the great bread and baking instructor at J&W (now at cia). I had no idea where to find it so I asked a sophmore and got the answer, "Look it up!" I must have found it in the Larousse as that was my only source back then. or it was in the avi baking manuals.

but it is almond meringue layers. I have the paper to prove it!!!

bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
Reply
bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
Reply
post #5 of 38
M brown.You never have to prove anything to me! I have a great deal of respect for you.
It is however not in Larousse as a Almond Meringue...it is in Larousse as I stated above. I will keep "looking it up though"
Hey I also went to J&W :
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Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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post #6 of 38
Nanna, thank you for your research. I have not seen it done that way..but it sounds very tasty....Those little caramel candies look awfully good
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Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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post #7 of 38
Thread Starter 
Ohmygod! I won the Renshaw Cup a million years ago and part of the prize was a trip to England and weeks seminars at the company headquarters in Mitchum Surry!
Thank you Nanna for posting that site!! I wrote and thanked them!
Wow,
bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
Reply
bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
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post #8 of 38
Japonaise is the almond meringue, as I know it. I never knew about the meat and artichoke one.

I also went to J&W, and Japonaise referred, not only to the meringue, but also the classical torte made with that meringue. Where is my J&W book? I have to find it. Why do I think it had coffee buttercream? Yeah, and it was garnished with a disk of pink marzipan, and ground almonds up the sides? Does this ring a bell for you, mbrown?

By the way, I'm so jealous of anyone who had chef Coppedge. I had Opotzner.

On a sidenote, my assistant (who is 21), garduated from the Connecticut Culinary Institute, and guess who her bread instructor was? Opotzner! That man has a lot of chutzpah! He must be over 80 by now.
post #9 of 38
Now how cool is that!!!!!I love the way this whole internet thing works sometimes
M Brown That's quite a presteges award.
I'm not worthy
between you and momoreg, you could rule the world :
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Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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post #10 of 38
Ok Ok Ok I get it
Look it up in Larousse! You will see the Asian one I am talking about.....
I truly appreciate your help. You guys are the best....I will leave this thread alone (maybe)Or you guys will ring my Cloche!!
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Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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post #11 of 38
Thread Starter 
My calculation, Chef Opotzner is 103! He was a dear man and my first bread instructor, I made knot rolls until the cows came home! Coppage was the advanced bread man, he is probibly the sharpest tack I ever encountered when it came to the art of baking bread.
The Japonise torte you refer to is, by my memory correct. For the hallway I worked with Constance Brown the photographer recording each cake ( I visited this past fall and they are still there!). My first food styling gig. good times........................
bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
Reply
bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
Reply
post #12 of 38
In retrospect, did we really have to do that many knot rolls? I think it was maybe a bit of overkill. But he was a sweet, albeit crotchety man. I don't know of Constance Brown. How long did you stay in food styling? I did it for a couple of weeks, for Chocolatier. It was a lot of fun.
post #13 of 38
There is a recipe for Japonais in the Time-Life book Patisserie. It is a almond meringue, of oval shape. The two disk of meringue are sandwich with a buttercream. The sides are aslso brush with buttercream and rolled in almond pralin. You can also have Japonais rolled in white pralin.

There is no reference of this pastry in the Larousse Gastronomique

A ice cream bomb made of iced green tea and peach ice cream is called Japonaise.
When I get a little money, I buy books. And if there is any left over, I buy food.

- Desiderius Erasmus
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When I get a little money, I buy books. And if there is any left over, I buy food.

- Desiderius Erasmus
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post #14 of 38
Sorry M Brown, by the time I got down the page I forgot you had posted the definition of the Japonais...
When I get a little money, I buy books. And if there is any left over, I buy food.

- Desiderius Erasmus
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When I get a little money, I buy books. And if there is any left over, I buy food.

- Desiderius Erasmus
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post #15 of 38
Nice to meet you, LoriB. Welcome to cheftalk.


Since we have so many alumni here, when did you all attend? I went from '84-'86.
post #16 of 38
78/80 but please don't tell anyone!!!! :
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Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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post #17 of 38
LoriB, Please excuse me for not saying hi!!
So Hi!!!!!!!!
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Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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post #18 of 38
I won't tell anyone. So that makes you...29?
post #19 of 38
Lenotre too....1st book.
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #20 of 38
perhaps its just me.

The cake japonaise usually refers to the above reference, i.e. two meringues, sandwiched with butter cream and masked with toasted almonds with praline (very tasty).

Also, to my belief, french cuisine refers to certain foods by name by its aspects, i.e. cuisine japonaise would refer to foods of japanese origin or perhaps those that correspond to french beliefs of being japanese or having japanese characteristics.
"Nothing quite like the feeling of something newl"
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"Nothing quite like the feeling of something newl"
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post #21 of 38
Went to J&W (Charleston), 94-95. Had Berndt Gronert as my patisserie instructor. He was to busy expounding upon the superiority of German baking to enlighten us to things such as Japonaise.
Anulos qui animum ostendunt omnes gestemus!
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Anulos qui animum ostendunt omnes gestemus!
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post #22 of 38
They were both in Charleston when I was there. Berndt had been in Providence the year before, Armin had been at Charleston for a while. Berndt was known as the "funny one", a very comparative assessment. My favorite Berndt quote: "What do you do when your creme Anglaise breaks? Well you could go into the corner and cry like a little girl, but that will not help your sauce". Of course, you have to say this with a German accent to be funny, or maybe you just had to be there.
Why did Berndt leave Providence? If it's not something you can post, PM me; my chef buddies love Berndt Gronert stories.
Anulos qui animum ostendunt omnes gestemus!
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Anulos qui animum ostendunt omnes gestemus!
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post #23 of 38
m brown, what is maize? I know it's a bread or roll. But where did it come from? What is it made with?
"Every kiss is a blessing"! Or is it "Every blessing is a kiss"
Does anyone know what time it is.
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"Every kiss is a blessing"! Or is it "Every blessing is a kiss"
Does anyone know what time it is.
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post #24 of 38
Thread Starter 
maize is the native american term for corn.
maybe you are thinking of corn bread or a term for a spacific corn bread or flat bread/
bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
Reply
bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
Reply
post #25 of 38
OK, I feel stupid. I was thinking of the tortilla. I've been up for 36 hours catching up on some work. So, please forgive me.

[This message has been edited by Chef David Simpson (edited 01-10-2001).]
"Every kiss is a blessing"! Or is it "Every blessing is a kiss"
Does anyone know what time it is.
Reply
"Every kiss is a blessing"! Or is it "Every blessing is a kiss"
Does anyone know what time it is.
Reply
post #26 of 38
Thread Starter 
dude, no biggie.
have a good nights rest.
bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
Reply
bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
Reply
post #27 of 38
m brown, I got some sleep. But, still want to know where torilla's come from? Some say Mexico and some say Alaska.
"Every kiss is a blessing"! Or is it "Every blessing is a kiss"
Does anyone know what time it is.
Reply
"Every kiss is a blessing"! Or is it "Every blessing is a kiss"
Does anyone know what time it is.
Reply
post #28 of 38
Alaska, really?
post #29 of 38
In Spain tortilla means omelet, In Mexico it means a thin, flat,unraised pancake made with cornmeal,flour,salt and water...I would think because of the origin of corn and wheat that tortillas must have come from mexico or Spain.Or somewhere similar
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Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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post #30 of 38
I wonder which came first, the Spanish or the Mexican version.
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