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Lemon Curd

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
Hello out there....I have a wonderful recipe for Lemon Curd and think that it would be wonderful in a Lemon Meringue Pie but the curd never gets thick enough. Would it be possible to add a package of unflavored gelatine while I'm cooking it so that it gets the right consistency for pie?
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One cannot think well, love well, sleep well if one has not dined well. unknown
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post #2 of 11

Lemon curd

Hey LPool,
I usually add 1/2 to 1 teaspon of cornstarch disolved in a little splash of cold water. It becomes thick as soon as it comes to temperature. If it is too thick, add a little more water before removing from the stove. Hope this helps out.
Please feel free to visit me at therealisticcook.com for other helpful tips and hints.
Happy Kitchen!
Realistic Cook
post #3 of 11
Thread Starter 

Lemon Curd

Hey thanks, I hadn't even thought of cornstarch. I'll give it a try.
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post #4 of 11
Add another yolk and cook longer..
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Outside of a dog, a book is a man's best friend. Inside of a dog it's too dark to read. - GM
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post #5 of 11
It never gets thick enough for a pie, or thick enough for lemon curd? Why don't ypu post the recipe.

In the For-What-It's-Worth-Dept, here's a recipe that I know works, made by my favorite "lemon princess" Sometimes I even help her pick the lemons ....

Machrina’s Lemon Curd

Machrina sez:

"I got this recipe from Shirley Beaven, an English woman who was for many years part of the congregation at Church of the Resurrection in Pleasant Hill, CA. Shirley’s lemon curd was locally famous and much prized. It is best made with Meyer lemons (I think so, anyway - but any lemons can be used), and parishioners would bring Shirley their lemons, and she would make curd. This was always a top seller at the Christmas bazaar."

1 lb (about 2 cups) sugar
1/4 lb (1 stick) unsalted butter
juice and zest (finely grated rind) of 4 lemons (about a cup juice)
6 eggs

Melt together the sugar, butter, juice and grated rind in the top of a double saucepan over simmering water. Stir to mix. When all is melted, remove top pan and allow to cool. (I use a single saucepan and just watch it carefully- this stage is melting, not cooking.)

Beat the eggs lightly and strain into the pan of cooled lemon mixture. Return the pan to the stove and cook over low heat, stirring frequently, eventually almost continuously, until it reaches a thick, creamy consistency.

Pour into clean, warmed jars, and when cool, cover and store in the refrigerator. This can keep for months. Makes about 26 ounces.
post #6 of 11
Thread Starter 
Hi Shel, it never gets thick enough for a pie. But I think that I'll try the cornstarch first because the ingredients seem to be in perfect harmoney for the taste that I was looking for. I'm afraid if I add another egg yolk that it will mess up the taste that I am striving for. I am writing down your recipe though. I agree about the meyers lemons....we have a couple of meyer lemon trees and they produce some of the best tasting lemons out there.
One cannot think well, love well, sleep well if one has not dined well. unknown
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One cannot think well, love well, sleep well if one has not dined well. unknown
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post #7 of 11
I used to make a trifle with lemon curd. I'd simmer fresh cherries briefly in a mixture of rum and triple sec and set aside to cool. Tear up or cut up either angel food cake or pound cake. Put a layer of cake in the bottom of your dish, top with a layer of cherries and a layer of lemon curd. Repeat. Top with whipped cream. Everyone really liked this an it was fast and easy. Lemon curd is so great.
post #8 of 11
Yesterday I came across this recipe for lemon curd. It's from Margaret Fox, former owner of the Cafe Beaujolais in Mendocino. Margaret made good food, and people would devour her curd, which she also used as a filling for lemon tarts, which would also be devoured quickly. If the recipe works well in tarts, maybe it'll work well for a pie.

Here y'go:

Cafe Beaujolais Lemon Curd

Zest from five lemons
1 cup + 2Tb fresh lemon juice (works out to juice from 5 to 7 or so lemons)
1 1/2 cups sugar
1/2 tsp salt (assuming plain table salt)
6 whole eggs
12 egg yolks
1 cup + 2 Tbs unsalted butter cut into small pieces

Place peel, juice, sugar, salt, eggs, and egg yolks in the top of a double boiler. Mix with a whisk over med heat never letting the water touch the bottom of the top pot (unless you want scrambled curd!)

Whisk continuously for about fifteen minutes until thick. Add butter one piece at a time, thoroughly incorporating each piece. Whern all butter is incorprated, strain the mixture. It can be stored in the fridge or frozen.

Now, I've enjoyed the curd and eaten the tarts at the restaurant. Very, very tasty, IMO.

Perhaps this will help you in some way.

Kind regards,

Shel
post #9 of 11
Hi, I'm new to this forum I was looking for a cheese forum, but this caught my eye

When I make lemon curd I always think it's not thick enough for pies but I find if I cook it longer than usual and put a jar of it in the fridge and use straight from the fridge

good luck
post #10 of 11
you could also use arrowroot to thicken....it works better with the acidity of the lemon. the cornstarch will lose some of its power.

It also gives a shine to what it thickens. Plus, it has less of an impact on taste than cornstarch.

And if you want something a little different---try kudzu powder. (may be the only useful use for kudzu)
post #11 of 11

I use the following recipe courtesy of Punk Domestics, it is always thick and delicious....not to mention simple:

 

 

Preparation: 15 – 20 minutes

Ingredients (yield: one 300-350 ml jar):

juice from 3 lemons

zest from 1 lemon

12 – 15 tablespoons castor sugar (or 10 tablespoons sugar + 5 tablespoons cooking sweetener which is usually sweeter than sugar)

2 eggs

1 flat tablespoon cornstarch (or potato starch, but cornstarch gives a lighter result)

1 heaped tablespoon butter 

Mix everything in a blender, apart from the butter.

Pour into a small pan, add the butter and warm at low heat, constantly stirring, until it thickens.

Taste and add more sugar if needed. Stir well until the sugar/the sweetener dissolves.

Put into a jar, close the lid and let it cool down.

Keep in the fridge for up to two weeks.

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