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Charnushka

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 
I just received my Penzys order. In it I ordered a small jar of Charnushka which they said was used on NY Jewish Rye. I thought I was getting a small dark caraway type seed. In fact it's not at all and kind of hard to describe. Seems almost like a small charcoaled onion bit.
I'll try it on the Rye, as they say, but I'm curious if anyone else has used this seed and what their thoughts or suggestions are.



And no, I'm pretty sure they're not mouse droppings (but hey I could be wrong!)
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My latest musical venture!
http://myspace.com/nikandtheniceguys
 
Also
http://www.myspace.com/popshowband "I'm at the age when food has taken the place of sex in my life. In fact I've just had a mirror put over my kitchen table." Rodney Dangerfield RIP
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post #2 of 6
I think these are in fact onion seeds, if you plant them you will get nice, delicate spring onions. I know nothing about its culinary use though.
post #3 of 6
If they are in fact onion seeds - then in India we use them quite extensively and are called Kalonji, I use them in onion bahjis and vegetable dishes. I usually sautee in oit to release the flavor and aroma before adding to vegetable dishes. It is also included in something called panch puran (five spices) which also has fennel seeds, mustard seeds, cumin seeds and Fenugreek seeds - again used quite widely in vegetarian dishes. Also sprinkled on naan and other breads
What is patriotism but the love of the food one ate as a child? ~Lin Yutang
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What is patriotism but the love of the food one ate as a child? ~Lin Yutang
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post #4 of 6
Thread Starter 
Thank you, you are both correct apparently. Charnushka turns out to be the Russian name. And being Onion seeds (sort of) it makes sense to put them on Rye, it also now makes sense that you heat them in oil to release their flavor. I guess the heat of the oven would do the same. Tasting them straight from the container, they seem pretty worthless.
I read that they are also used to aid indigestion in Elephants :eek: How they know that, I don't want to know! But hey, it's worth a try ;)
Thanks for the info!
My latest musical venture!
http://myspace.com/nikandtheniceguys
 
Also
http://www.myspace.com/popshowband "I'm at the age when food has taken the place of sex in my life. In fact I've just had a mirror put over my kitchen table." Rodney Dangerfield RIP
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My latest musical venture!
http://myspace.com/nikandtheniceguys
 
Also
http://www.myspace.com/popshowband "I'm at the age when food has taken the place of sex in my life. In fact I've just had a mirror put over my kitchen table." Rodney Dangerfield RIP
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post #5 of 6

yes - many years ago jewish bakeries did put them on rye bread. Not as a replacement for caraway seeds but as another variety. They have a bitter taste. And they do look exactly like droppings!

post #6 of 6

also known as Nigella seeds

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