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Frenched Rack Of Lamb

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
Does anyone know how to make a rack of lamb "frenched'?
post #2 of 13
You trim away the meat from the bone ends and clean them of all tissue down to the main eye of the meat before cooking. A paring knife or boning knife will be your friend for this task.

It leaves the end of the bone exposed. Basically "french" in cooking means to make it long and skinny. Think French fries, french-cut green beans and now the bones of the roast.
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #3 of 13
If you make a horizontal cut between each bone, then cut down the middle of the tissue that runs down the length of each bone, you can pull the whole, fatty piece of tissue off the bones like a jacket. Scrape a little more off the sides of each bone and you have a lovely "frenched" rack of lamb. Brush the bones with a littl oil, then wrap them with foil while cooking and they'll be a nice creamy color when you're done cooking the meat.

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Liquored up and laquered down,
She's got the biggest hair in town!

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www.foodandphoto.com

Liquored up and laquered down,
She's got the biggest hair in town!

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post #4 of 13
save the meat too. It is great to put in a soup or something.

Can I come over? I can show you how. All I ask is for a piece or 2 or 3 or maybe 4
post #5 of 13
Here's the real scoop. Cut down the middle of the bone, not in between, along, the bone, and then cut across the bottom where you want it to separate. Use the back of your knife in between the bones to loosen up the connective tissue, then use a towel to peel it back.

Perfect frenched rack everytime.
post #6 of 13
Thread Starter 

YES!!!!!!!YES!!!!!!!!!YES!!!!!!!!! anyone, especially professional chefs who want to come and show me how to do this is more than welcome to join me for dinner! Now, does anyone make a good tiramisu? I also need a volunteer to bring vegetables!
post #7 of 13
This is correct, Kaun nailed it. Think of the connective tissue as being shrink wrapped onto the bones. By slitting the tissue in front and back of the bones it separates enough (from being so tight) to get your knife under the membrane and scrap it off. I use green scrubbies cut into small squares to do this. If you receive your racks whole as I do, run on your ban saw to split and remove the chin.Cut the upper breast segment just until you reach the tissue, carefully peel back the entire mass removing all the membrane in one shot (more of a challenge if your not familiar with butchering techniques)
Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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Baruch ben Rueven / Chanaבראד, ילד של ריימונד והאלאן
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post #8 of 13
I agree also with Kuan's method. If I want the bone really clean, I use butchers twine, doubled up, wrap it around the bone and yank it clean. There's nothing like it. And it is somewhat cathartic...
post #9 of 13
Ever since the late unpleasantness, I have had my racks of lamb "freedomed."
The genesis of all the world's great cuisines can be summed up in a four word English phrase: Don't throw that away.
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The genesis of all the world's great cuisines can be summed up in a four word English phrase: Don't throw that away.
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post #10 of 13
Excellent!
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #11 of 13
Had to think about that a moment, Grumio. Down heah, "the late unpleasantness" refers to a totally different war. :suprise:
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #12 of 13

Kitchen String

Anneke's way works really well. We do ours with kitchen string too. In one easy pull the bones are completely clean. Just make sure you score the membrane on the bone like Kuan said. Then we make staff meal with the scraps....yum!! Fatty lamb stew anyone?
Keep those fires burnin'
 
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Keep those fires burnin'
 
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post #13 of 13
Capisce. It's just too nice a phrase to limit to one war.
The genesis of all the world's great cuisines can be summed up in a four word English phrase: Don't throw that away.
Reply
The genesis of all the world's great cuisines can be summed up in a four word English phrase: Don't throw that away.
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