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Will the Butter Burn?

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
In my "Quest for Quiche" I found a few recipes and ideas for making the crust with shredded, frozen hash browned potatoes. All the recipes call for thawing the potatoes, eliminating as much moisture as possible from them, then mixing the potatoes with butter or margarine, using the mixture to line a pie tin, and baking the crust for about 25-minutes @ 425 to 450-degreess F. Since all the recipes call for the same technique and temp, I suppose it must be correct, however, before continuing any further I thought I'd ask the creative and experienced people here if the temp might not be too high, and iof the butter might burn.

So, food mavens and geniuses, what say you?

Shel
post #2 of 14
I wondering how you think that pie crusts are made. My quiche crust has nothing but butter and flour and water. It is blind baked completely then the cold custard is added.

Potato crust, could be that it will taste good but for the love of French food please don't call it a quiche.
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"Just can't wait to get on the road again."
Willie Nelson
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post #3 of 14
Thread Starter 
This ain't French food, it's an American quiche ... :lol:

So, will the butter burn?

shel
post #4 of 14
I see no reason why the butter would burn, any more than the potatoes!
I just would recommend you try something else.
Why use frozen pre-prepared potatoes? The defrosting, eliminating the liquid, mixing with butter, etc will take you more time than just grating potatoes from scratch (really!) and who knows what else is in frozen hashed browns. Plus they cost more.
Try this:
Grate a couple of potatoes, depending on the size - two very large (less time to peel) or three medium. Grate on the coarse side of the box grater (the side that is like round holes) or with some kitchen gadget like a food processor - i can;t tell you how because i donl;t have one. It takes a minute by hand anyway and there is less to wash.
Toss with salt and pepper - grate in a small onion if you like.
Very heavily butter the quiche pan.
Press the potatoes into the pan so they form a solid coating all around, like a thick crumb crust you might use for a crumb crust pie.
Bake it blind for something like 20 minutes at high heat high in the oven so the top of it gets some heat (you want it to make a crusty crust eventually, i've never had it come out burned)
Fill with whatever quiche filling you want - and finish baking. I like using high heat for quiche because it makes a beautiful golden splotchy top, which is very appetizing, and the crust gets a bit crispy.

As for the name, Breton Beats, what do you suppose quiche means anyway? It has the same root as cake, kuchen etc. in fact, it appears to have derived from the Alsace-Lorraine dialect and directly derived from the German "kuche" (i don;t know how to get the umlaut) so, really, we don;t need to be so picky. Like in italian, all cakes and pies can be called pizza (I've even had a chocolate cake with fudge frosting called a "pizza" here).
If someone objects to calling it a quiche, call it something else - who cares, it tastes good. Isn't that what food is about?
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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post #5 of 14
Thread Starter 
Hi siduri,

I often grate my own potatoes and make my own hash browns, and have been doing so for years. I agree that doing so is easy and that the results can be quite good. My technique is a little different than the one you suggest, and actually results in a somewhat firmer and crispier end product compared to using the box grater (at least my box grater).However, when I'm working on learning a technique I may sometimes use a prepared ingredient just to make things a little easier. In this case I know exactly what's in the frozen hash browns that I'll use, and I know the quality is good. Also, the frozen organic hash browns I use actually cost about the same as the fresh organic russets sold at the same store, and less when using a discount coupon. And they're actually a tastier potato than the typical russet, being Yukon Gold, which is my favorite potato.

AS for the name "quiche," you are absolutely correct about the German origin. I really didn't want to get into that with Mr. Beats. I just wanted to be sure the butter wouldn't burn using the high tems suggested in the rcipes I looked at. Anyway, I sometimes get on the same high horse when it comes to people who call grilling BBQ, so I didn't feel right making too big a deal over the issue.

Thanks for jumping in.

BTW, I made one of your cauliflower dishes and was pleased with the result.

shel
post #6 of 14
At 20 to 25 minutes it will not lose enough water to burn the butter solids. But if you are worried about it, you could clarify the butter first, which would bring the browning point way up on the temp scale.
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I am a reduction of my youthful mistakes mixed with the roux of a few adult successes
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post #7 of 14
Thread Starter 
Thanks - I've been thinking about making a batch of clarified butter or ghee, I may do just that - nah, probably not for this first test recipe run, but later on I will just to have some around. Gotta refresh myself on the technique as it's been more than 15 years since I made the stuff.

shel
post #8 of 14
It seems to me that 425-450 degrees F might be a little hot to get a nice golden, toasty brown potato crust. I haven't tried what you are proposing, but I have made something similar with thinly sliced potatoes. In my experiments I found that lowering the heat and baking longer gave me a better result-375-400 might work a little better.

This sounds really yummy whatever you choose to call it!
Good luck!

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post #9 of 14
Thread Starter 
Thanks for your input. I think I'll call it Quentin.

shel
post #10 of 14
You use butter in regular pie crust too. Does it burn?
post #11 of 14
Thread Starter 
I don't bake - never made a regular pie crust that I can recall. Most recipes that I've seen call for baking pies and pie crusts at lower temperature.

Have a nice day ...

shel
post #12 of 14
Just a suggestion- I just made a quiche - conventional, pre-baked crust - using shredded hard-smoked Salmon, called Squaw Candy in the Pacific Northwest, with shredded Gruyere cheese under the filling. Plus a little dill and some chopped onion. Turned out great.

You could use Lox or another smoked salmon; it would be quite different than the Squaw Candy. But still good.

Mike

"REAL MEN DONT EAT....well, you know ;)
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post #13 of 14
Thread Starter 
While it's not what this thread was about, your idea is a very good one, and probably similar to something I make here every now and then. North of here, in Sonoma County and also along the Coast from about Fort Bragg and north, one can get beautiful salmon jerkey made from wild caught pacific salmon. The jerkey isn't that dried-out stuff like you get in plastic packages, but beautiful, succulent naturaly smoked fish. When it's available, it's time to migrate north and pick up a few pounds.

I'll add the fish to eggs, munch it as a "candy" treat, sometimes add a few pieces to soup. It's so delicious. It would go well with the hash brown crust.

shel
post #14 of 14
Makes sense.
as for the cauliflower dish, thanks. i love it. even people who hate cauliflower usually like it.
"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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"Siduri said, 'Gilgamesh, where are you roaming? You will never find the eternal life that you seek...Savour your food, make each of your days a delight, ... let music and dancing fill your house, love the child who holds you by the hand and give your wife pleasure in your embrace.'"
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