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Gadgets to rescue Thanksgiving

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
The tools that could save Thanksgiving: Day 2 | Kitchen Gadgets - CNET Blogs

Gimmicky, but a few things I actually do have such as an immersion blender, timer, fat separator, thermometer and so on. My daughter won some turkey lifters. I think they're pretty useless but they're not mine to throw out.

They're have been times the rack multiplier would have been useful, but I would need a convection oven for it to cook reliably I think.
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #2 of 14
Okay, this may seem dumb, but I'm gonna ask it anyway...

Might I inquire why the turkey lifters are thought to be useless?

We cook up a 20-24 pound bird, and as the designated hoister, I was thinking about getting a pair, if only to give me a larger "platform" upon which to balance the carcass between the roasting pan/cradle and the carving platter.

I don't care much for trying to use the carving fork and some other slender pointed object to make this transitional move, as I've just about lost more than one hot and heavy "lump-o-meat" when things went to shift.

It ain't pretty when as things go to shift, there's a grab for a "handle", the leg comes off in your hand, and the bird lands on the counter, threatening to jump to the floor. Good thing for quick feet, an ample belly, and Spray 'N Wash to get the stains out of the apron...
I might be suffering from CDO.
It is just like OCD, except the letters are in alphabetical order.
Just as they should be...
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I might be suffering from CDO.
It is just like OCD, except the letters are in alphabetical order.
Just as they should be...
Reply
post #3 of 14
Thread Starter 
They tend to hang up in the rack or you can't get them under the turkey because of the rack or the roasting pan itself. And they also tend to rip up the turkey.

And for the rest of the year, they create havok in your gadget drawer.

That's all just my experience though.
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #4 of 14
Good points.

I'll have to look at this again...
I might be suffering from CDO.
It is just like OCD, except the letters are in alphabetical order.
Just as they should be...
Reply
I might be suffering from CDO.
It is just like OCD, except the letters are in alphabetical order.
Just as they should be...
Reply
post #5 of 14
I agree, Phil, that they're the next best thing to useless for their intended purpose. But I find them handy for lifting things like a whole pork tenderloin.

All in all, they make a better extra tool with the grilling stuff than in the kitchen.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #6 of 14
I agree, Phil, that they're the next best thing to useless for their intended purpose. But I find them handy for lifting things like a whole pork tenderloin.

All in all, they make a better extra tool with the grilling stuff than in the kitchen.

But they'll never replace tongs, that's for sure.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #7 of 14
Knowing you helps but the mental image of things is worth not only the price of admission but the help I now need to get up off the floor!
post #8 of 14
When I saw the title of this thread, I immediately thought of a cell phone...to call for take-out.

I do like those turkey lifters, but I use them for lifting large prime ribs.
post #9 of 14
Well, I went to our favorite collagen and silicone convergance point (Williams Sonoma) and purchased a pair of their All-Clad turkey lifters. (made in China, BTW...)

Nice tool store, but the customer service was less than I'd been led to expect.

That could be an entirely different topic, so I won't go into the "rude" right now...

Anyway, tested them out today with a 22# bird, and I must say that I was pleasantly surprised.

Inserted one "lifter" into each end of the beautifully cooked turkey (oh how I love our convection oven), just above the handle on the "V" shaped rack, fully seating each fork. I made a single "stab" with each, as I figured that piecing the meat was why the pointy parts of the fork tines were so sharp...

The concave surface on the top of each lifter allowed for thumb placement, which completely controlled any roll that occurred as the turkey was freed from the rack.

The penetration of the forks did not seem to cause any significant damage, and the transition from rack/pan to platter was very smooth.

Of course, your milage may vary, but I found the turkey lifters to be worth the investment/effort...

I've done more damage lifting a turkey with a pair of carving forks.

But then again, I'm just a guy who cooks at home...

Next can we discuss "Ov-Gloves"???
I might be suffering from CDO.
It is just like OCD, except the letters are in alphabetical order.
Just as they should be...
Reply
I might be suffering from CDO.
It is just like OCD, except the letters are in alphabetical order.
Just as they should be...
Reply
post #10 of 14
>Next can we discuss "Ov-Gloves"???<

Other than being incredibly overpriced, what's to discuss?
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
Reply
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #11 of 14

Ove-Glove? Not for me ....

I had to look them up with a web search. Not something I'd care to use. Putting them on and taking them off would be an annoyance for me. Much rather use a towel ... I even hate those oven mitts and pot holders.

shel
post #12 of 14
I've found that for utility use (lifting heavy pans out of the oven, etc.) they work very well...

The tactile response is great, and the kevlar/nomex heat barrier is just as advertised. No heat transfer issues at all.

I do wish is that they offered them in a gauntled style for use out on the grill.

For holding a hot pan handle when stirring the contents of a pan, a towel works well, but if I need to securely get my fingers into the "D" shaped handles of a roasting pan or manipulate a foil covering inside the oven, I'll opt for the gloves.

And they are really pretty easy to get your hands into.

Pricey? Yeah, I suppose so, but you get the protection that you pay for. No chance of singing/burning the back of your hand on the upper rack or side of the oven, avoiding the resulting flinch which could send hot food out of it's intended cooking vessel to unwanted areas (floor/shoes/bottom of oven).

They work for me...
I might be suffering from CDO.
It is just like OCD, except the letters are in alphabetical order.
Just as they should be...
Reply
I might be suffering from CDO.
It is just like OCD, except the letters are in alphabetical order.
Just as they should be...
Reply
post #13 of 14
Thread Starter 
I use standard eating forks for the turkey. One in the cavity, one in the neck cavity and can lift, roll, transfer with easy. No special gizmo required. Yesterday's turkey was 22 pounds. No problems.

As to the gloves, I've got a couple of sets of guantlet leather welding gloves. i use these for outdoor charcoal dutchoven cooking, grilling, seasoning cast iron and the occasional oven foray. The Ov-gloves are only rated to 450 as I recall. Not high enough for my uses. The downside of the leather is that it has a sudden transition from comfortable to killer heat.
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
Reply
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
Reply
post #14 of 14

Turkey sling

I've never used turkey lifters. When I was growing up, Dad always used a twine "sling" that he'd position on the rack in the roasting pan under the turkey before putting the bird in the oven. After cooking, when it was time to move the bird from the pan to the platter for carving, he'd grab the loops of the sling, and lift. It's like handles for the bird. No muss, no fuss, and solid as a rock. When the bird's on the platter, you rock it a little to free the sling from underneath it, pull it out, rinse it under the faucet to knock the big chunks off, and throw it in the dishwasher or washing machine for a more thorough cleaning.

I've used something similar now myself for several years. Not much to look at, but it works great. Can't remember where I got it; grocery store or somesuch. Probably cost all of $1.99.

You could easily fabricate one yourself out of a length of twine if you're handy with knots.
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