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convection ovens in the pastry shop

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
Hi, I'm about to start up a new pastry shop and am undecided as to which oven I should choose. I don't plan to be doing huge volume and so am not considering a full rack oven. Also my space is really tight. One option I've been considering is a mini-rack oven such as tha one made buy Baxter. It looks good on paper and the undermounted proofing cabinet is a good plus for space saving. Another oven along these lines is the mini-rack by Guyon West. This one is a little more expenxive though. Alternately, I'm thinking why not start low, save some money in start-up costs and maybe upgrade a little further down the road. In this regard I'm considering a convection oven like those by Blodgett or Vulcan etc. I know these have drawbacks, but I've used them before and I'm still standing. This option is interesting in that it could save me around $10,000 at the beginning.
Does anyone have an opinion or a recommendation for one brand. A review of the Baxter rotating mini-rack oven would be real helpful.
Thanks
tim
post #2 of 20
Don't know what you mean by mini-rack ovens, but if they're the kind that only accept the 1/2 trays, don't bother. If your business grows you will have to replace them, and you won't get your money out of them when trading them in for full size ones. Also the 1/2 tray ovens won't accept many sizes of muffin pans or larger cake pans either.

When checking out ovens on line, look a the guarantees and warranties. The things that go first is the doors, beware the mnfctr that only has 1 yr warranty on the doors!!!! Don't go with super-deluxe control panels, the electronics on these panels usually go after the warranty expires and can get very costly to replace. Blodgett, Baker's Pride and Bakbar (Montague too, I think)ovens have a water injection feature which comes in handy for breads and rolls. All this is is a squirt gun aimed at the squirrel cage fan, the water evaportes on contact with the oven walls producing steam. However this cools down the oven quickly as well.
...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
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...."This whole reality thing is really not what I expected it would be"......
Reply
post #3 of 20
Thread Starter 

Don't know what you mean by mini-rack ovens

A mini rack oven is similar to a roll-in rack oven but stands on legs and usually naccomodates around 8 full size sheet pans. Mondels are available from Baxter, gemini, blodgett and others.
If anyone has anything to say about any of these ovens, or has feedback about a good convection oven for the pastry shop, please let me know.
thanks,
tim
post #4 of 20
Hi Tim...did you ever get the information you were looking for? I am also looking for ovens for a small bakery, just cakes and cheesecakes, and I am getting conflicting information from both restaurant owners and equipment salesmen. Some say that convection is absolutely the way to go, others say no way should I consider baking cakes or cheesecakes in a convection oven. I'm confused.
post #5 of 20

go with what you know

what type oven have you had success with?
well then, buy that type and keep the streak alive.:bounce:
bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
Reply
bake first, ask questions later.
Oooh food, my favorite!


Professor Pastry Artswww.collin.edu
Reply
post #6 of 20
Thread Starter 
hi sadie1,
I've decided to start with a double vulcan gas convection oven. I'm expecting it to work acceptably even though it should prove to be more labor intensive (rotating pans, etc.). As soon as I feel comfortable making a big purchase, though, I have my eye on the Baxter mini-rack rotating oven, it looks good and I've gotten good reviews for it.
post #7 of 20
Hi Tim,

Did you check out the Doyon Jet Air Ovens? It doesn't have rotating racks, but the "jet air system" is supposed to change direction every two and a half minutes or so, so you don't need rotating racks. Ever heard of it? Vulcan is supposed to be great! I'd love to hear how it goes..roughly where are you located?
post #8 of 20
Thread Starter 

doyon are deep ovens

Hi Sadie,
I have heard of Doyon and they are supposed to be very good. Unfortunately they're also very deep (upwards of 50") and are too big for my puny bakeshop. Vulcan is a top brand but I do expect that any conventional convection oven will represent a compromise. Anyway a compromise if fine for now, we'll see how things go.
tim
post #9 of 20
Thread Starter 

doyon are deep ovens

Hi Sadie,
I have heard of Doyon and they are supposed to be very good. Unfortunately they're also very deep (upwards of 50") and are too big for my puny bakeshop. Vulcan is a top brand but I do expect that any conventional convection oven will represent a compromise. Anyway a compromise if fine for now, we'll see how things go.
tim
post #10 of 20
My 2 cents:

Basic & Simple to start.

The more bells and whistles, the more that breaks. I have a Vulcan gas convection oven, and after 8 years, I had to replace the electronic gas control. I did have to replace the bulb socket earlier. I'm at home now and will try to get the website for the commercial part company. They have a lot of the commercial brands and models listed along with exploded diagrams and parts lists. It is a good resource for buying replacements parts.

As for baking cakes and cheesecakes, I avoid a convection oven like the plague! I'm sure I could modify a cake recipe's method so it would work in a convection, but I've had the best results with a conventional oven.

When my partner and I first opened, we were buying our equipment from an local, established restaurant supply. They knew we wanted a oven we could bake bread in, and they asked $75. to drop off two old blodgett deck ovens which were in pretty bad shape (saved them from taking them to the dump). We chose one to keep and gutted the other for parts. We invested about $2,000.00 for 'stone' slabs and new gas controls. I then had a local metal shop make me two long, 1/4" thick iron troughs in which I pour hot water when steaming bread. It works great, but boy, I bake at a high temp, and gas deck ovens put out a lot of heat!

Good luck
post #11 of 20
My 2 cents:

Basic & Simple to start.

The more bells and whistles, the more that breaks. I have a Vulcan gas convection oven, and after 8 years, I had to replace the electronic gas control. I did have to replace the bulb socket earlier. I'm at home now and will try to get the website for the commercial part company. They have a lot of the commercial brands and models listed along with exploded diagrams and parts lists. It is a good resource for buying replacements parts.

As for baking cakes and cheesecakes, I avoid a convection oven like the plague! I'm sure I could modify a cake recipe's method so it would work in a convection, but I've had the best results with a conventional oven.

When my partner and I first opened, we were buying our equipment from an local, established restaurant supply. They knew we wanted a oven we could bake bread in, and they asked $75. to drop off two old blodgett deck ovens which were in pretty bad shape (saved them from taking them to the dump). We chose one to keep and gutted the other for parts. We invested about $2,000.00 for 'stone' slabs and new gas controls. I then had a local metal shop make me two long, 1/4" thick iron troughs in which I pour hot water when steaming bread. It works great, but boy, I bake at a high temp, and gas deck ovens put out a lot of heat!

Good luck
post #12 of 20

If you don't even know whether or not its good to bake a cake in a convection oven, WHAT are you possibly doing wanting to start a bakery?!? Please stay out of the kitchen.

post #13 of 20

pretty chesty coming from a student.

post #14 of 20

I would agree with bigbadpastry. There is really no need for that kind of response. We are here to ask questions and get advice. Why make someone feel stupid for asking a question?

Anyway, in my old bakery, I had a Picard  8 shelf rotating deck oven with the stone shelves. I was wonderful for everything I had to do. I sold the place a few years back and now looking at a new shop. The only oven in there is a Revent single rack oven. Though not ideal for bread, it should do a good job on everything I need. But I hear that they are not good for cake baking. Does anyone have any insight on this? I need to bake cake but don't want to buy an additional oven. The Revent is nice because the back panel is glass that faces the dining room. Nice view for the guest.

post #15 of 20

@tim brock 

 

I have worked with all types of ovens in my time (deck, convection, and conventional) and I have to say that is really does come down to what type of 'pastries' you are wanting to make.

 

I find that people go all out and spend an awful lot of money on ovens only to realize they did not need to spend that extortionate amount as a good ol' conventional oven does the trick every time. 

 

I know I know....everyone wants the latest and greatest...lol (this is just one opinion based on my years actually doing this not what I have read) 

 

I wish you well on your new adventure and hope you find the right machine for you!!

post #16 of 20

Don't purchase a Baxter brand rack oven. They are poorly made, and customers across the US are quickly finding that out. Hobart knows Whole Foods, and many other large corporate customers are displeased with their products. They're a nice oven, when they work.... but most of the time they don't. Electrically/computer the oven is not stable, and lots of part failures for the oven too. Enjoy you're 1 year warranty, it won't last and will be expensive to repair thereafter. 

post #17 of 20
Could you then tell e what I ens you would recommend?
post #18 of 20

What are you wanting to produce?  What volume?  What budget?

post #19 of 20
I bake mostly pound cakes. I have a variety of flavors that need different baking times. I want ovens that will let me bake 600-800 in a day. So maybe 100 per batch. I will also eventually be making tarts, scones and croissants. I have tried convection ovens for my cakes and it was a disaster.
post #20 of 20

sounds like a rotating rack oven would work best for your needs - especially if you have had a bad experience with convection.  

Check Baxter, Revent, LBC, Doyon, and Gemini.

 

There are various sizes and price points.

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