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Sanitation and Safety

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
i am going to be taking this class in my spring semester (new student) and im just curious as to generally what is going to be covered. i know that theres a lot but this class is a 3 unit class equivalent to nutrition or even basic cooking techniques. im just wondering exactly HOW much there can possibly be to go over (im sure im in for a surprise)
post #2 of 9
One word: "microbiology"

Well, there's more to the class, but that one topic could easily take up 3 credit units by itself.
post #3 of 9
excellent answer, was trying to think of 2500 words or less. Just think of everything you use, food and non food, and how you take care of it from the time it is delivered until it is served or used.
Proper storage, temps at all times, personal safety, making sure all equipment is up to par, fire prevention. and training, training, training. You can never let your guard down in this area.
Nan
post #4 of 9
I have this class now. No worries you won't be stuck for info. You can fill 1/2 semester with what nasties are associated w/ what foods. Then you can fill the other 1/2 w/ how to avoid, and kill them.

Mike
post #5 of 9
I had the same opinion as you but was surprised by how much material was actually in the class. There is a whole lot more to it than, "You need to wash your hands".
post #6 of 9
We had to take a class called Food Safty (Serve Safe) and you have to be serve safe certifed. But basicly you learn the microbiology like castiron said. Most likely youll have to take the serve safe test wich you need to get a 75 on or higher. Its a 90 question test that covers everything from the danger zone to coving (where the walls meet the floors)

Deff make sure you pay attention
"Some of us Cook. Some of us Grow. All of us Eat."
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"Some of us Cook. Some of us Grow. All of us Eat."
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post #7 of 9
Most importantly,retain all information you learn in the class and NEVER let it go.In this business,people do know the RIGHT way,but will trade it for the EASIER way many times.I've seen more than a few chefs turn their backs on proper training and procedures because they get lazy.Don't get lazy;it can and will make someone sick or worse.It's a fact.

I have driven employees crazy because I am so anal-retentive about sanitation and doing the right thing,but there is a reason for it.Any chef or cook who decides on short-cuts or not doing exactly what they are supposed to do should not even be in a kitchen preparing food for the public.I worked for Ritz-Carlton and was disgusted and STUNNED by what I saw in the kitchens...but sadly,it happens all the time.I have even walked away from great paying jobs because morally and ethically,I totally disagreed with how the kitchens were being run.

Stand by your principles and what you know is right.
"Sometimes people can be oh so dense"

The Pixies
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"Sometimes people can be oh so dense"

The Pixies
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post #8 of 9
I cant add anyting other then pay attention,

The cooking temps, and food storage is critical to know.

Alot of it is common sense except like what others have said,

What illness comes from what and how to treat it or what are signs of it.
post #9 of 9
Exactly ..... it also carries home with you - my wife calls me "Mr. Safety" as I'm constantly nagging on her when we cook in the kitchen together at home (I prefer to go it alone, truthfully, as most folks outside the industry - as well as many in the biz, unfortunately - don't follow proper basic sanitation and safety precautions in food prep/storage ......... I find it hard to even go out to eat, knowing how a lot of people are, unfortunately.)

It's a course well worth taking, and especially worth retaining (and enforcing on others) as AtlTournant stated.
Bakers - we make a lot of dough, but not so much money
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Bakers - we make a lot of dough, but not so much money
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