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Demi Glace

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 
Is it possible to make your own Demi Glace in a home kitchen. How practical would that be....or is it better to buy? If I decide to buy, which brand is best. Seems like most are too salty (like bouilion cubes), but I guess the salt is a preservative to extend life of the product.

Thought I would like to try making my own chicken demi glace. Any advice? Any recipes? Any thoughts on the matter would be most welcome!
post #2 of 10
It's certainly very doable, the only thing you really need is some spare time... and a lot of stock.
"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
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"If it's chicken, chicken a la king. If it's fish, fish a la king. If it's turkey, fish a la king." -Bender
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post #3 of 10
More than Gourmet makes a good low salt demiglace. expensive for the amount, but the quality is there. When you consider the time investment, the price gets better.
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #4 of 10
Been lots of threads on Demi-glace. Depends on whether you want to make it with brown sauce (traditional) or white sauce.

Get a book on Escoffier's The Art of Cooking. That's my bible for making traditional sauces.

Others will disagree that Escoffier was not traditional at the time of his writing, and others will say he is traditional with respect to what's done in commercial kitchens today.

Whatever!

The best food is that which you make yourself.

Have a go at it. It is doable in a home kitchen. Chicken demi-glace is faster than Veal demi-glace as the stock doesn't take as long among other things.

doc
post #5 of 10
I made demi glace at home once, following the CIA recipe & consulting Escoffier & a few others.

I've also made numerous various batches of glace de insert french word - straight stock, highly reduced - & much preferred both the results & the process.

Is there any particular reason why a home cook would make demiglace rather than glace de viand? Does throwing a roux in at some point justify the extra effort? Anyone know?

I think homemade stock & glace is WELL worth the effort. Do it. Really.

Really.
The genesis of all the world's great cuisines can be summed up in a four word English phrase: Don't throw that away.
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The genesis of all the world's great cuisines can be summed up in a four word English phrase: Don't throw that away.
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post #6 of 10
So for a Demi Glace you just boil stock until its greatly reduced?
post #7 of 10

A quicker demi-glace

I make a sauce based on a recipe from America's Test Kitchen. It works for me.

Basically, you brown some tomato paste in oil, add onion, carrot, and garlic. Brown the mixture (all a little water from time to time to prevent scorching) Add flour and cook a bit. add red wine and boil for a minute. Add chicken and beef broth (low sodium, or homemade), pepper, thyme, and bay. Reduce to half (35 to 40 min). Strain and cool. Freeze in ice cube trays.

I use homemade stocks, so there is no saltiness issue.

The recipe is on the America's Test Kitchen site. Look for the recipe on steak Diane (you will have to register)
post #8 of 10
Buy some veal bones. Follow the oldest recipe you can find.:chef: Enough already............
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One time a guy pulled a knife on me. I could tell it wasn't a professional job; it had butter on it.- Rodney Dangerfield -


'We're ALL amateurs; It's just that some of us are more professional about it than others'. - George Carlin
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http://www.frappr.com/chefsunited
One time a guy pulled a knife on me. I could tell it wasn't a professional job; it had butter on it.- Rodney Dangerfield -


'We're ALL amateurs; It's just that some of us are more professional about it than others'. - George Carlin
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post #9 of 10
Demi is part glace de viande (reduced brown veal stock) and part espagnole (reduced dark veal stock thickened with roux). It is the preferred method for making sauces for large venues because they require less stock. Glace de viande is simply not practical - though not impossible - for banquet kitchens. Just more expensive. Not everyone likes glace; demi is a bit lighter and allows for more variations. Though it has fallen out of favour in recent years, it is a classic sauce that deserves its place in gastronomy.
post #10 of 10
Thread Starter 

Thank You

To All.....Now I am armed with lots of good information. Had not been aware of the other threads, but those, plus answers to my query above gives me a lot to go on. Being of retirement age, have the time required to invest into the project. Will give it a "go"!

"phatch"...I appreciate that website...."More than Gourmet"
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