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What's YOUR Favorite Salmon Patty Recipe

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
Salmon croquettes - mom used to make 'em when she made chopped liver. and we kids, especially me, loved 'em. Last night, while giving Buddy, my cat, a little salmon treat, I decided to make up some croquettes, not having had them since I was about twelve years old. They were pretty good, and so easy to make (never made 'em before).

Searching the 'net one can find numerous recipes for these "fish burgers", some look great, some not so great, and often the recipes and techniques reflect regional differences.

So, what is YOUR favorite croquette or patty recipe.

shel
post #2 of 14
My mom used to make 'em too. But she used canned salmon, which I hated then, and have had no reason to change my opinion since. So I have no affinity for salmon croquettes as such.

Here's a recipe for Salmon Cakes, however, made with fresh salmon, that's pretty good:

In a skillet saute a cup of minced onion in half stick butter until lightly colored.

Meanwhile, put about 2 1/2 cups flaked cooked salmon in a bowl. Toss the salmon with the onion mixture, a couple fo lightly beaten eggs, half cup bread crumbs, 1/4 cup minced broad-leaf parsley, and salt & white pepper to taste.

Form the mixture into patties about a half inch thick, dust with flour, and saute them in in a combination of oil & butter, turning them and adding more butter as needed, until they are golden brown on both sides.

Mayo flavored with minced fresh tarragon goes nicely with these.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #3 of 14
My mom did them with canned salmon too. Since then the only salmon I like is smoked/kippered.

The bones in the canned salmon were the worst. Yes, they been pressure cooked and aren't particularly hard, it was just the sudden sandiness and texture with a too fishy mushiness.

On a related note, my sister thought for a long time she didn't like tuna fish. Turns out she doesn't like Miracle Whip which is what my mom always used with the canned tuna. So now she likes tuna, both canned and fresh, and definitely likes Mayonnaise.

Interesting how our parents form our tastes.
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #4 of 14
I make them but don't follow an exact recipe. I use canned salmon or even mackerel, which, for some odd reason, is Les's preference.

I drain the juices into a bowl and then pick out all the bones and skin. I know that's not a necessity but I can't stand having them in my patties. Then I add a beaten egg, black pepper, onion powder, and salt, if needed. Sometimes I crush saltine crackers finely and use them, other times I use a mixture of 2 parts cornmeal to one part all-purpose flour and add that to the bowl. Then I mix it all together and pat out into croquettes. Then dust with more flour and fry in a bit of vegetable oil.

I love serving these with mustard potato salad on the side.
post #5 of 14
Thread Starter 
I - I suppose I should have mentioned that I don't need "an exact recipe," but getting some more ideas about ingredients or techniques would be useful. For example, one fellow makes ball-shaped croquettes, rolls 'em in matzoh meal, and then fries them. Who's a thunk it :lol:

As for the bones and skin, why not just buy boneless and skinless salmon?

The mustard 'tater salad sounds like a nice adjunct.

What does mackeral taste like? Is it a more oily fish, stronger or milder flavor than salmon?

Thanks,

shel
post #6 of 14
Mackeral is a fairly oily fish, Shel, with a strong flavor. Almost like bluefish, IMO.
They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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They have taken the oath of the brother in blood, in leavened bread and salt. Rudyard Kipling
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post #7 of 14

salmon croquettes

Mom made them from canned salmon. I immitate her recipe, but if I have left over fresh salmon (often buy extra on purpose:smiles:) I use that. Never pick out the bones. They are soft, almost dissolve in the cooking & the calcium is a good thing for us older women.

Anyway, salmon, eggs, salt & pepper, matzoh meal - somtimes some other herbs or spices if they are around & if the salmon is left over fresh there are always herbs and spices in it - shape into patties and fry the families, bake mine with a light brushing of olive oil.
post #8 of 14
When I make salmon patties, it's usually because the budget is very tight that week. It's not one of my favorites but for a lot less than most fresh meats, I can serve my family something they'll eat. Boneless, skinless definitely costs more!

Yes, mackeral is a more oily, stronger flavor than the salmon. I can get it for about half the price of salmon.
post #9 of 14
Thread Starter 
Ahh, I see that you're in Maine. The canned salmon prices at Trader Joe's are quite good compared to other stores, so, even when on a tight budget, the boneless/skinless Alaskan salmon doesn't break the bank. AFAIK, there's no TJ's in Maine. Just curious, what do you pay for canned salmon and mackeral? Here it's $1.49 for a short can, boneless, and $2.29 for the tall can, with bones.

Thanks for the mackerel info. Perhaps I'll give it a try.

shel
post #10 of 14
Nope, not in Maine, I'm in rural northeastern Indiana. There is no Trader Joe's within a 45 mile or more radius of where I live. I can usually find the (16 oz?) can of Alaskan Salmon for $1.99-2.49 and the mackeral will usually run $.99-1.49.
post #11 of 14
Thread Starter 
Whoops - sorry. I was looking at someone else's location.

Prices here on the tall can of salmon can run as high as $3.29 in some instances. Of course, that store is also charging about $5.00 for a half pound of butter that I can get for $2.19 at TJ's - same butter!

Thanks, allie.

shel
post #12 of 14

salmon croquettes

I am in Maine... and we don't have TJ's but it is in Ma where I go often enough. Canned here is over 3 if I remember right, but fresh is only $6/lb. A real staple for us! Since we keep kosher, when my hubby eats meat it is expensive. I am a fishetarian so we eat a fare amount.

Just realized the topic is actually fave salmon recipe - love it lots of ways! Poached, teryakied, glazed, stir fried, as fish sticks...
pgr
post #13 of 14
Thread Starter 
$6.00/lb - amazing! East Coast farmed salmon? I can't even get crappy frozen here for that. Good salmon (wild Alaskan, northern pacific) is somewhere around $18.00 or more.

I'll post a great salmon gefilte fish recipe if you're interested. BTW, the topic is fave salmon croquettes/patties, but hey, post away with as many salmon recipes as you'd like. I love salmon - and I'd be happy to share the many that I have. But y'know, no matter how tasty or interesting a recipe may be, my favoite is the simplest: a thick filet poached rare in just a mild court boullion, or maybe just with some ginger or lemon.

shel
post #14 of 14

fave salmon

POst the gefilte fish please
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