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What does it mean when someone says a wine is dry?

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
What does it mean when someone says a wine is dry?

Does this mean it has more alcohol?
post #2 of 17
Im not a wine person but

It usually leaves like a dry feeling in your mouth. I wish I new more but I will eventually.

try looking it up on like wine.com they have alot of info on wines.
post #3 of 17
In overly simple terms, it's the opposite of sweet. Nothing to do with alcohol content.

Ghetto, I think what you are referring to is 'astringent', when you get that feeling of having swallowed a piece of velvet...
post #4 of 17
Thread Starter 
So in wine terms that would mean the opposite of fruity as well then?
post #5 of 17
Ouch ! don't quote me on any of this: I'm NO expert!!!

Abe, I never really thought fruity and sweet were synonymous, or that a fruity wine implied sugar. Do you?
post #6 of 17
Dryness in wine is referring the drying affect it has on your mouth and palate. High alcohol content can add to this but not always. Tannins also can elaborate a wines drying profile. Astringency is similar issue (Anneke, I like the velvet metaphor) but you'll know the difference when you taste/feel it.

Generally speaking (and by generally I mean inaccurate enough that I can already imagine myself apologizing) dry wines have a shorter "half-life" in the mouth. You get the fore-taste than it retreats fairly quickly. Dryness has more to do with body than flavor in this sense. Fruit is really a none issue here. Many dry wines have a strong fruit profile.

-Al
post #7 of 17
You will know a dry wine when you taste it. It's the first descriptive word that comes to mind.
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post #8 of 17

residual sugar

how "dry" or "sweet" a wine is refers to the amount (measured in percentage) of residual sugars left in the wine after fermentation is complete. Dry wines are generally in the 0.2–0.3 percent range, off-dry wines in the 1.0–5.0 percent range, and sweet dessert wines in the 5.0–15 percent range. A dry wine can just as easily be "fruity" as it can be "tannic".

Aaron



post #9 of 17
I think dryness was definetly covered above, but I wanna add anyhow. Since Abe asked if dryness had a relation to alcohol. Although a dry wine doesnt have to be "high" in alcohol, or the other way around either. A relationship still somewhat exsist, but is basically irrelevant. The sugar ferments to create alcohol, so the wine gets less sweet and higher in alcohol, but finished product depends on how much sugar the wine started with.
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post #10 of 17
In wine terms? Check out the arome wheel.

post #11 of 17
As a note: there can be fruity, dry wines; this is quite common with Pinot Noir and several other varietals.
"Never use water unless you have to! I'm going to use vermouth!" ~Julia Child

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"Never use water unless you have to! I'm going to use vermouth!" ~Julia Child

"No chaos, no creation. Evidence: the kitchen at mealtime. "
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post #12 of 17
but pretty much only in New World Pinot Noirs. Red Burgundy is not noted for "fruitiness!"
post #13 of 17
That is a good point ChefJune.
"Never use water unless you have to! I'm going to use vermouth!" ~Julia Child

"No chaos, no creation. Evidence: the kitchen at mealtime. "
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"Never use water unless you have to! I'm going to use vermouth!" ~Julia Child

"No chaos, no creation. Evidence: the kitchen at mealtime. "
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post #14 of 17
its interesting on that arome wheel chart that mushroom falls under EARTHY , but there is a section on the wheel for vegetable.

Im only new to wine so don't roast me too hard, im mainly looking for something tasty - with no hang-over in the morning :beer: hehehe
post #15 of 17
Mushroom is pretty much the "poster child" for Umami. The flavor and aroma you get from mushrooms is very different from that you get from, say, asparagus or string beans.

What are you looking for in a wine?
post #16 of 17

It means that all of the grape sugars have been converted to alcohol during the fermentation process. semi dry retains some of the sugar and would taste sweeter and of course the dessert wines which have most of the sugar and are very sweet.

post #17 of 17

French Bordeaux is usually quite dry. One sip and all the moisture in your mouth evaporates......can you say pucker?????

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