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Sauce for Pork Tenderloin En Croute?

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
Greetings to all the culinary professionals out there,

We started running pork tenderloin en croute (wrapped in puff pastry) as part of a special holiday buffet. Today was the first day we ran it, and feedback was that there should have been a sauce to go with it.

I do not expect to just throw this question out and have all my problems solved, but I was wondering what possible flavors could accompany this, keeping in mind that the puff pastry shouldnt get too soggy.

Some flavor components I have thought of include red wine, mustard, mushrooms, and tarragon. Is there anything else that could go with this type of dish?
post #2 of 18
Generally I would pair something like this with thick sauce, like a hot emulsion. Almost any of the flavors you mentioned can be incorporated in this way. The sauce will be sturdy enough that it won't soak into the pastry.

Pork is great in that it can take any number of flavors. You might also consider a chutney or compote with this sort of dish. Fruit would work as would a tomato and onion "jam" sort of thing.

--Al
post #3 of 18
I like the jam idea. Maybe a cumberland sauce of sorts. Chili pepper marmalade?
post #4 of 18
read the heading and dried cherry sauce came immediately to mind.....usually add alittle "heat"....

Pig heads make the best jell.....oh, man....I've been using the reduce goo in all kinds of soups, sauces ....(the turkey gravey was not turkey....;)
Just flavors the fruit goo...not necessary but nice.
cooking with all your senses.....
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cooking with all your senses.....
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post #5 of 18
A honey and balsamic vinegar reduction goes amazingly well with pork tenderloin

Cat Man
post #6 of 18
If you do want to use something a bit juicy, use a base for the pastry made of shortcrust pastry, then use the puff pastry just for the top. You make an oblong box of the shortcrust over the outside bottom of say a loaf tin (depending on the size of the pork) put the pork and your flavourings in as usual, then cover with the puff pastry. Its a tip taken from the Two Fat Ladies :)
 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #7 of 18
Fuji apple gastrique made with ice wine. It is really good and easy to make. Caramelize your apples in butter, cover with the wine and simmer for about 20 minutes with a single clove and a pinch of cinnamon. Strain out the apples and reduce to syrupy consistency.
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post #8 of 18
yeah I agree apple with pork, maybe a little cider and wholegrain mustard too :lips: yummm!
post #9 of 18
Thread Starter 
I am really like all the ideas guys, especially the apples. It hit me as soon as I went to bed, APPLES. Thanks for all the input, I will sit down with my chef and we'll work something out. Who knows, I might get him to join here and start posting.
post #10 of 18
Try putting the fruit ideas inside the "En Croute" And Sauce with a Traditional Madeira/Marsala/Or even Do a Decadent butter sauce with a seasonal roasted (dark) vegetable... Pumpkin/Squash or ????????????? Get the idea?:chef:
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http://www.frappr.com/chefsunited
One time a guy pulled a knife on me. I could tell it wasn't a professional job; it had butter on it.- Rodney Dangerfield -


'We're ALL amateurs; It's just that some of us are more professional about it than others'. - George Carlin
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post #11 of 18

sauce for pork en croute

i think i would do a fruit compote, relish or chutney..something served on the side so as not to make the crust soggy..this time of year i think cranberries. i just made a cranberry port sauce for thanksgiving that was really good, and quite simple..i put in candied orange slices to add a bit of texture..cranberries have a mouth feeling of being light which i think you would want with this dish... sometimes i make an orange chipotle sauce when i roast pork tenderloins..how do you serve this on the buffet? do they hold up well without becoming overcooked in a chafer, or do you carve it at a station..always looking for new meat entree ideas...
joey

food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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food is like love...it should be entered into with abandon or not at all        Harriet Van Horne

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post #12 of 18

 

Just in echo of what's said here (and elsewhere): fruit and pork are often lovely together. And I think you are right, kuan, the Cumberland sauce is marvelous with the pork en croute, which I tried some years ago after reading one of the Spenser detective novels by Robert B. Parker, in which the charming protagonist makes just this dish (and, incidentally, it seems, Parker is wont to describe his hero making something pretty good, or at least interesting, in each story).

Cheers,

JB

post #13 of 18
Pineapple, cumin, cinnamon, allspice, cayenne could be the basis of a good chutney.

mjb.
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #14 of 18

Agreed on the Cumberland sauce.  I just  find apple sauce a bit too much old hat, although I do agree it should go well.   I like to see an onion,clove, cream, and sage gravy with sauce, starting base a white wine reduction with a good chicken stock  The idea of too much sweet with meat puts me off.  I think that it's possibly the USA palate that appreciates this sweetness the most, no insult intended, it just seems we're not reallly acccustomed to it here.  Different strokes for different folks. :) , to coin a phrase.

 

But pork and sage with cream are great friends, so give it a go.  I like the idea of an onioncchutney with it it so you don't have to use a heavy vreamy sauce,, just as a nice counterpoint to the richness of the pork.

 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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 Don't handicap your children by making their lives easy.
Robert A. Heinlein

 
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post #15 of 18

maybe a sauce of honey, soy, orange, butter and cinnamon, like the sauce of a duck a l'orange

post #16 of 18

Deglaze pan you seared tenderloin in with apple jack brandy add some stock 1/2 chick  1/2 pork reduce. Dice an apple ,some shallots and garlic, parsley and thyme,   saute till transparrant add reduced deglaze mixture. bring to boil strain. now add some dried cranberry simmer till soft correct seasoning then serve in gravy boat  on side of tenderloin.  Cranberry Apple Jus

Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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Chef EdB
Over 50 years in food service business 35 as Ex Chef. Specializing in Volume upscale Catering both on and off premise .(former Exec. Chef in the largest on premise caterer in US  with 17 Million Dollars per year annual volume). 
      Well versed in all facets of Continental Cuisine...

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post #17 of 18

For a sauce I would suggest to sweat shallots until just getting colored with a minimum of fresh sage leaves, add chickenstock, reduce, add cream, reduce, s&p.

 

How about serving pork with braised red cabbage with a lot of apples in it? It's sour/sweet (add vinegar and brown sugar) and delicious with pork.

Also; panfried peeled applewedges or cubes, type Jonagold or similar sweet apples. Fry cubes in butter until they start to get a little color. Then sprinkle with sugar, a little lemonjuice and let caramelize.

post #18 of 18

Here is my recipe for apple gastrique.  Grastrique is an easy French sweet and sour sauce that is easy to do and will pair well with your pastry wrapped pork.  In Italy this would be called an apple "agrodolce."

 

Apple gastrique:

1/2 c sugar

1/3 c cider vinegar

1/2 c apple juice

1/2 granny smith apple, peeled and chopped.

1 large sprig of fresh thyme

4 c chicken stock

2 T butter

S+P

 

The process is the same as any gastrique.  Melt the sugar in a saucepan and let it carmalize a bit.  Add everything accept butter, S+P.  Reduce to 1 cup. Skim any foam off that rises to the top.  Mount butter, season and serve.

 

This sauce thickens in two ways: by reduction as in every classic gastrique but also with pectin.  Granny smith apples contain a good bit of pectin as those who have used them to make jams and preservatives know.  Pectin is a hydrocolloid that will thicken the sauce as long as it's acidic and sugary.  Calcium helps to stabilize pectin much like sodium alginate which you'll get plenty of from the chicken stock.  

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