ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › Turkey Broth/Stock
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Turkey Broth/Stock

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
Hi,

I took the turkey from Thanks Giving and some meet and make some stock as I usually do. Only this time after cooking it a full day, I let it simmer for a few ours the next day also. Instead of ending up with a translucent brown colored broth, I got a milky substance. Is this normal? I had been planning on making gumbo. Is the milky stock usable or do I have to scratch it?

Thanks in advance.
post #2 of 14
#1, you cooked it way too long. Also, if you let it boil for ANY amount of time, it would break up all the meat and cloud it. You did use the raw turkey carcass and meat though right?
post #3 of 14
Thread Starter 

Turkey Broth/Stock

Thanks for your reply.

To answer your questions, partly. I used uncooked turkey neck and gizard, but some of the meat and all of the bones were from a roasted turkey.

Would you say that it's completely useless?
post #4 of 14
At what point did you remove the solids? I usually simmer mine another hour two after I remove the solids and defat the stock in order to concentrate the flavor a bit.

Let me clarify. Simmer 2 hours with carcass and aromatics. Remove solids, strain finely, defat. Simmer another hour or two to the right flavor.

It definitely sounds like you cooked it too long to me.Taste it. If you like the flavor, go ahead and use it.

Phil
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
Reply
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
Reply
post #5 of 14
It is still fine to use, though maybe not as pretty as you would like. When you cook stock for too long, the fat emulsifies right into the stock. There is nothing wrong with it though.
It's Good To Be The King!
Reply
It's Good To Be The King!
Reply
post #6 of 14
Part of the problem was definitely that you use roasted turkey for it. It isn't a stock or broth at all then, more of a turkey flavored water. You can definitely still use it though if you like the taste. When you do a poultry stock or broth, generally you cook it for 3-4 hours. Never boil it, always definitely use raw carcasses and meat. Use about 20% mirepoix (onion, celery, carrot), and skim the fat often.
post #7 of 14
So you don't consider the various brown stocks stock?

They're made with roasted bones.
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
Reply
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
Reply
post #8 of 14
Turkey stock will do that if it boils at all. You can clarify it if you want, but for a gumbo you don't really have to. To clarify: strain all the meat and any bouquet garni from the stock. Return stock to pot (rinse pot first). Heat stock to just under a simmer. If it starts to bubble, turn it down. Beat two eggs with 1 tbsp. vinegar. Pour mixture into stock but do not stir. In a few minutes a "raft" will begin to form on top of the stock. Wait until the raft covers the entire top of the stock. The raft will pick up any impurities in the stock and float it to the top where you can remove them when you skim the raft off. For a really clear stock you sometimes have to do it twice, but this would be for a crystal clear consumme, not necessary for what you are doing. Once you have skimmed the raft off, proceed as normal. The raft ingriedients will in no way affect the flavor of your stock as they don't stay in it. Chicken for some reason doesn't seem to turn milky if it accidentally boils, but turkey stock will. There's nothing wrong with it as it is, just that it would look funny if you were using it for turkey noodle or some other clear broth application.
post #9 of 14
Obviously yes, but we're not talking about brown stocks, were talking about white turkey stock.
post #10 of 14
I'm not so sure. Most of America makes a stock from the roasted turkey carcass --hopefully with some meat still attached. This is always a darkish stock.

I agree it's not as strong as one made with a fresh carcass or roasted fresh carcass, but it's not bad either. That's why I reduce my Thanksgiving stock
to concentrate the flavor.

Phil
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
Reply
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
Reply
post #11 of 14
The stock boiled and therefore the fat from the turkey clouded the stock. Bring the stock up slow and never let it simmer, Then refrigerate and remove the ( fat) The stock will be much better and you will have learned an important lesson. :lol: We have all made mistakes including the most prominent (self proclaimed cooks/wannabe chefs). There is more to cooking than the food itself. Just spend some volunteer time with a "Real Chef" Enjoy your time in the kitchen.:chef:
http://www.frappr.com/chefsunited
One time a guy pulled a knife on me. I could tell it wasn't a professional job; it had butter on it.- Rodney Dangerfield -


'We're ALL amateurs; It's just that some of us are more professional about it than others'. - George Carlin
Reply
http://www.frappr.com/chefsunited
One time a guy pulled a knife on me. I could tell it wasn't a professional job; it had butter on it.- Rodney Dangerfield -


'We're ALL amateurs; It's just that some of us are more professional about it than others'. - George Carlin
Reply
post #12 of 14

Sounds Good!

Wow...I really enjoyed this post!
Just out of curiosity….Do you know where I can purchase good quality foods online? I am now trying to order from online stores only because of various reasons…….can you help me with any suggestions??????
There is only one place, out of all that I have tried that really stood out for true quailty, and that is Celebrityfoodds.
If you can help me grow my list of quality services or stores, where I can buy my food, I would greatly appreciate it.
Thank you! :chef::chef::chef::chef:
post #13 of 14
Thread Starter 
You guys are so freaking awesome! I'm obviously no pro. I love to cook, though and I've really learned something important. Thanks all for the great advice.
post #14 of 14
A few years ago, a friend called me while I was doing just this particular bit of post-Thanksgiving cooking & asked me what I was up to. "Oh nothing much, just makin' gumbo with the turkey carcass..."

Hmmm. "Makin' gumbo with the turkey carcass."

Sounds like... a euphemism for something that you don't want to know what the euphemism's for.

just... lewd. or something.

nevermind.

was excellent gumbo, anyway.
The genesis of all the world's great cuisines can be summed up in a four word English phrase: Don't throw that away.
Reply
The genesis of all the world's great cuisines can be summed up in a four word English phrase: Don't throw that away.
Reply
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Food & Cooking
ChefTalk.com › ChefTalk Cooking Forums › Cooking Discussions › Food & Cooking › Turkey Broth/Stock