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LF: Potato soup recipe

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
Okay, I haven't had it in a LONG time and I'm yearning for some potato soup. Anyone have a recipe? I tried to google it, but I couldn't find a plain one. I just want the potato and the soup. Nothing else.

Than I can worry about adding extras.:p
Clutch n Meth - 9-5-05

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Clutch n Meth - 9-5-05

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post #2 of 14

Potato Soup recipe

This is about as simple as it gets:
6 potatoes
1 stalk celery-sliced
1 carrot
4 chicken bouillon cubes
2 onions or to taste
5 cups water
1/3 cup butter
1/2 tsp. pepper
1 tsp. salt
1 Tbl. parsley
Put potatoes, celery and carrot through slicer in a food processor. Cook all until tender and then add 1 can evaporated milk.

Our church multiplies this to roaster size to serve for soup luncheons in the fall. Enjoy!
post #3 of 14
Here's the recipe I've used. Enjoy!

1 T butter
6-8 medium baking potatos
Chicken Broth
2 lg onions
1 can evaporated milk
16 oz pkg shredded colby or cheddar cheese
salt and pepper to taste

Peel and chop potato into bite sized pieces. Cover with broth. Chop onion, stir into potato and broth. Bring to boil until potato are cooked thru. Remove from heat for 5 minutes. Stir in milk and cheese and butter. Let melt, salt and pepper to taste.
post #4 of 14
This is an excellent potato soup as you get the flavor of browned potato and boiled potato in the same soup. It is of my own devising

2 tablespoons fat/oil--I like 1 each of butter and bacon grease
1 onion, chopped
1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
1/4 teaspoon rubbed sage
1/4 teaspoon dried crumbled rosemary
1 clove garlic, minced
2 medium russet potatoes for grating
2 medium russet potatoes for cubing
chicken stock--up to a quart.
half & half or other preferred dairy--2-3 cups or to taste
salt and pepper
hot sauce

Heat the fat in a dutch oven over medium heat. Add the onions and sweat them a few minutes. Add the 3 herbs, a bit of salt and pepper and and sweat the onions a few more minutes. Add the garlic and stir through for about 30 seconds. Add 1 cup of chicken stock. Peel and then grate two medium russet potatoes into the soup pot. Stir through to mix and add chicken stock to cover. Also add some salt to flavor the potatoes.

Raise the heat to medium high, bring to a boil and stir every few minutes scraping up from the bottom of the pan. A wooden flat bladed spatula is ideal as it won't scratch the pot but will clean off the bottom of the pot. The grated potato will stick to the bottom and brown between stirrings. When the potato mix boils, turn down the heat to a simmer. Simmer 20 minutes, scraping the bottom of the pot every few minutes to cook the potatoes evenly. The mix will quickly become thick and gluey. Add chicken stock if it gets too dry, just enough to cover the solids.

Puree the contents of the pot with a hand blender or in batches in a food processor or blender. Return the contents to the pot. Add half and half to your desired soup consistency. Stir to mix and continue to stir, scraping up from the bottom of the pot every few minutes as before.

Peel and chop the remaining two russet potatoes and add to the soup. Adjust consistency with half and half if needed. Heat over medium heat watching it carefully. You want to avoid a boil as the dairy may curdle. A very low simmer is ideal. Cook until the cubed potatoes are done, about 25-30 minutes, stirring to scrape up from the bottom every few minutes as the pureed potato will continue to settle and brown on the bottom of the pot.

Add salt and pepper and a little hot sauce to taste. The broth will not be perfectly smooth but more homey in texture. When the potatoes are tender, correct seasoning and serve.

Good garnishes are grated cheese, even blue cheese, and crumbled bacon.

NOTES: The pureeing isn't absolutely necessary. The grated potato will mostly dissolve during the cooking time of the soup, but the puree does improve the texture overall.
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #5 of 14
Thread Starter 
LOL @ me. Well, almost a year later, I finally get to the recipe. It came out great, thank you all for the tips and help. Added the hot sauce to tase after being served as some people eating that night weren't too fond of the hot sauce idea.

:smoking:
Clutch n Meth - 9-5-05

School < Cooking

School + Degree + Job = $$$ for more cooking!
Reply
Clutch n Meth - 9-5-05

School < Cooking

School + Degree + Job = $$$ for more cooking!
Reply
post #6 of 14
Glad it worked out for you. This is one of my favorite soups.
Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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Palace of the Brine -- "I hear the droning in the shrine of the sea monkeys." Saltair
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post #7 of 14
Oh darn and here I ran to get my recipe collection to contribute my own potato soup recipe from Andreas Viestad! Oh well, too late.

But here I must say that my own personal moto in life is....

"NEVER BOIL A POTATO WITHOUT A BAY LEAF IN THE POT!"

and also

"NEVER MAKE POTATO SOUP WITHOUT THE PRESENCE OF LEEKS!"

That's right, I said it. Now spread the word.:roll:

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #8 of 14
Mapiva = Julia Childs? haha.

The recipe from MTAoFC is pretty good for POtato Leek soup
post #9 of 14
What's MTAoFC?

I wasn't kidding, bay leaves make all the difference in a potato. They're meant to be together. Just like potatoes and leeks. I don't question it. I just eat it.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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post #10 of 14
I have been thinking about potato soup. Weather is getting chilly and it is a fall favorite. My version:

1 pound of bacon fried until crisp, reserve the fat.
In 3-4 tablespoons of the reserved fat I cook the veggies:
1 large onion
2-3 ribs celery chopped
2-3 small carrots chopped
garlic to taste(optional)
Add whole milk (enough to cover everything) and 3-4 large peeled and cubed potatoes.
Simmer until potatoes get tender, try to not bring this to a boil or the milk will want to separate.

Corn bread on the side
post #11 of 14
Interesting you should mention leeks. I bought leeks on Sunday and made potato-leek soup yesterday. It's a pretty basic recipe.

1 pound small red potatoes diced,
2 leeks, thorougly cleaned & diced
1 shredded carrot
2 stalks diced celery
2 clove minced garlic
'sweat' the vegetables in some olive oil in the pressure cooker, then add some (cut up chicken--optional) and chicken broth, or vegetable broth & water to cover, salt, pepper, bay leaf, & parsley.
Lock on the lid, bring to pressure and cook 5 minutes. Let pressure drop naturally (this is part of the cooking time). Remove the lid and stir in heated milk or cream.

Serve, garnished with dollop of sour cream. Nice with crusty bread or corn bread.

My dear brother lives near us. I sent some home with him. He said the only thing he would have changed would be ... 'a larger serving'. :lips:

Oh, I forgot, it's not necessary, but I put about 2 cups of the finished soup in the blender, then stir it back into the pot. Adds another layer of creaminess.
"The pressure's on...let's cook something!"
 
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"The pressure's on...let's cook something!"
 
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post #12 of 14


your post reminded me of her recipe for potato leek soup.
post #13 of 14
For those who don't know, some woman named Julia Child wrote some book a while back called Mastering the Art of French Cooking

I'm somewhat embarrassed to admit this, but I no longer have a copy in my household. I do, however, have two copies of 'The Joy of Cooking' - I think the cats tried to pull a fast one on me...

mjb.
Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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Food nourishes my body.  Cooking nourishes my soul.
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post #14 of 14
I don't own many cookbooks but that's one that I'd like to have soon. I'll take it as flattery that JC would agree with me about the leeks and the bay leaf.

"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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"You are what you eat, so don't be fast, cheap, easy, or fake."

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