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If you could only have one kitchen knife.....

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
what would it be?

I don't mean Wustof or Chicago Cutlery this or that. What one knife would do the most for you?

Design it yourself.

Basic shape?
Length, width, thickness?
Type of steel?
Edge shape and sharpened to what angle?
Shape of handle?

Lastly, why?

Buzz :smoking:
Buzz - with a Short Pilot Story

One day, long, long ago there was this Pilot who, surprisingly...........
was not full of crap....
But it was a long time ago.... And it was just one day. The End
Reply
Buzz - with a Short Pilot Story

One day, long, long ago there was this Pilot who, surprisingly...........
was not full of crap....
But it was a long time ago.... And it was just one day. The End
Reply
post #2 of 17
-Gyuto
-From 9"-9.5", 3-4mm thick
-Carbon Steel
-10 degree single sided edge
-Thicker bolster up top so as to not dig into my finger, no bolster on bottom in order to sharpen, sort of a rounded triangle shaped handle with the flatter side on top.

-Why? It's comfortable, efficient and stays sharp longer.

-Basically, most japanese knives satisfy me.
post #3 of 17
my shun classic santoku, work for many tasks and stays sharp.

fits my hand
lighter weight
awesome handle
post #4 of 17
Thread Starter 
Chad - Great start. Any particular carbon steel? Why?

Buzz
Buzz - with a Short Pilot Story

One day, long, long ago there was this Pilot who, surprisingly...........
was not full of crap....
But it was a long time ago.... And it was just one day. The End
Reply
Buzz - with a Short Pilot Story

One day, long, long ago there was this Pilot who, surprisingly...........
was not full of crap....
But it was a long time ago.... And it was just one day. The End
Reply
post #5 of 17
Thread Starter 
Link - "fits my hand" and "awesome handle" ---- hand in hand (pun intended)

Yes, Shun makes as comfortable a handle as is available anywhere. Not trying to hijack my own thread, but my opinion is that the Shun paring knife is unbeatable. It's perfect ---- except ---- shun sharpens at 16 degrees per side when their steels are capable of 10 degrees or less. Of course this is easily fixed.

Love the feel of those handles.

Buzz
Buzz - with a Short Pilot Story

One day, long, long ago there was this Pilot who, surprisingly...........
was not full of crap....
But it was a long time ago.... And it was just one day. The End
Reply
Buzz - with a Short Pilot Story

One day, long, long ago there was this Pilot who, surprisingly...........
was not full of crap....
But it was a long time ago.... And it was just one day. The End
Reply
post #6 of 17
I don't know much about carbon steel other than it holds an edge longer and that it's typically easier to get sharp.
post #7 of 17
Thread Starter 
Okay. I agree for the most part. There are carbon steels such as Hitachi blue super which are extremely hard and also somewhat difficult to sharpen.... but once they're sharp. ohh la laa. On the other hand there are stainless steels such as Swedish Sandvik 13C26 which are not only easy to sharpen but also hold the edge beautifully. My subjective side says "carbon" but I know there is more out there....

Buzz
Buzz - with a Short Pilot Story

One day, long, long ago there was this Pilot who, surprisingly...........
was not full of crap....
But it was a long time ago.... And it was just one day. The End
Reply
Buzz - with a Short Pilot Story

One day, long, long ago there was this Pilot who, surprisingly...........
was not full of crap....
But it was a long time ago.... And it was just one day. The End
Reply
post #8 of 17
a 10 in chefs knife with no bolster that fits my hand like my wusthof santoku, it only needs shapened once and a while and that only to keep it perfect edge(if there is such a thing), the edge on the knive stays razor sharp no matter what i do or how hard i use it.
post #9 of 17
Thread Starter 
I like the 10' length. 8 is sufficient but 10 is better, especially (okay, obviously) when large items are involved.... watermelons, roasts, hams, etc.

Perfect edge? You guessed correctly. There is no such thing.

A disagreement about your eversharp edge. Every slice taken wears the edge. Physics, you can't fight it. No matter how it feels, the edge is slowly disintegrating.

Buzz
Buzz - with a Short Pilot Story

One day, long, long ago there was this Pilot who, surprisingly...........
was not full of crap....
But it was a long time ago.... And it was just one day. The End
Reply
Buzz - with a Short Pilot Story

One day, long, long ago there was this Pilot who, surprisingly...........
was not full of crap....
But it was a long time ago.... And it was just one day. The End
Reply
post #10 of 17
I know an theres not suck a knife but if there was one that fit that critereia i would only have 1 knive, but since i know there isnt that kind of a knife, and problay never will be that kind of knife, that just means i can buy more knives:smiles:
post #11 of 17
Thread Starter 
I agree, but this thread is a fantasy about only being able to have one knife. It's a mixture of fantasy and realism. Every knife does something, some well, some not. Tell us about the specifications you would give to a custom knife maker if you could only have one.

Buzz
Buzz - with a Short Pilot Story

One day, long, long ago there was this Pilot who, surprisingly...........
was not full of crap....
But it was a long time ago.... And it was just one day. The End
Reply
Buzz - with a Short Pilot Story

One day, long, long ago there was this Pilot who, surprisingly...........
was not full of crap....
But it was a long time ago.... And it was just one day. The End
Reply
post #12 of 17
well if i was going to get a custom knife done it be a 10 in chef, same feel as my wusthof but with out the bolster, i like how my wusthof has some weight to it but it isnt supper heavy, Also i would be carbon steel, iv never used carbon steel but what i have read about it on forums and such is it hold an incredible edge but its softer that the modern steels so it will get duller quicker. Im actually looking for a 10 in. chef carbon steel, i would pick a chefs becasue there isnt to many things you cant do with one where with most other knifes your stuck with what you got.



btw has anyone ever ordered from the sabatier website? or know where you can find there au carbone line of knives other that off there site?
post #13 of 17
Thread Starter 
Actually, Wusthof, Henckel, etc. steels are quite soft. Conversely, many carbon blades are extremely hard. It's partly composition, partly heat treating talent.

As to Sabatiers, and I am in no way selling, ebay Sabatier Vintage. I always have a couple knives for sale. Point is, and again, I'm not marketing, click on the Sab and Carbon links in the offerings to get a good idea of what sabatier is all about. Futhermore, to enhance that I am not trying to sell -- buy Japanese, not French -- much better knives.

Buzz
Buzz - with a Short Pilot Story

One day, long, long ago there was this Pilot who, surprisingly...........
was not full of crap....
But it was a long time ago.... And it was just one day. The End
Reply
Buzz - with a Short Pilot Story

One day, long, long ago there was this Pilot who, surprisingly...........
was not full of crap....
But it was a long time ago.... And it was just one day. The End
Reply
post #14 of 17
8"

Henckles

hollow edge

santuku

high carbon stainless

forged, full tang

What's not to love?
post #15 of 17
I want a moderately heavy, solid stainless steel uni-body, 10" Chefs knife. Sharpened at 10 to 12 degrees. It would be nice if there were a way to shave some weight off the handle as time goes by and the blade sharpening throws the knife out of balance.
I have large hands and would like the handle shaped like the Shun Ken Onion only built a little larger.
post #16 of 17
Basic shape:
8" Zwilling Four Star basis for the shape

Length, width, thickness:
8" 'French-shape' blade, but maybe slightly thinner~ 2-3mm blade max. thickness

Type of steel:
Aogami Super core clad with s. steel (curious about iron cladding?)

Edge shape and sharpened to what angle:
10-15 degrees, convex grind?, no Euro-bolster that extends to the edge

Shape of handle:
Zwilling Four Star shape but with a full-tang, riveted with natural black Pakka wood scales; smooth, flowing bolster only where the handle meets the blade

Lastly, why?
I like the shape of 8" Zwilling Four Star handle even if it feels like hollow plastic and I prefer the high curvature of French chef's knives compared to the usual gyuto or santoku; basically taking my favourite shape and size knife and rebuilding it.
Too bad the Four Star has cheapo handles and 'crap' European steel.
post #17 of 17
If I had to choose one knife from the one I currently have it would have to be my 160mm thin Chinese clever that I picked up at an Orental market for ~$9.

Very cormfortable handle
Nice wieght...not too heavy but not light
Very easy to put a 15 degree edge on using my Sharpmaker and it keeps the edge a long time. Cut my self pretty good on it and didn't even feel it.
Makes a great scoop to transfer whatever was just cut/sliced/chopped to the cooking area or bowl.
No idea what kind of metal but it appears to be stainless and fairly hard.
Took a little while to get used to but now I feel I can do everything with it that I cn do with a 8" chefs knife.
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